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ct that this house was once occupied by Margaret Fuller. The parlor and the room above are practically unchanged still, the former showing some handsome panelled wainscoting and, about the fireplace, probably the first Italian marble brought to America. The next house in Tory Row was that at the corner of Hawthorn street, known as the old Batchelder or Vassall place. This is one of the oldest houses in Cambridge, as it was mentioned in the early records as being already built in 1642. In 1717 the estate came by inheritance to Jonathan Belcher, afterwards royal governor of the province, and into the possession of the Vassall family in 1736, having been purchased by Colonel John Vassall. Five years later it was sold by him to his brother, Colonel Henry Vassall. It was he, probably, who built the ancient brick wall forming the boundary line of the estate at the corner of Brattle and Ash streets (then known as Windmill Lane), which has been a landmark in Cambridge for so many years.
nd Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, Joseph E. Worcester and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow among others occupied rooms in the venerable mansion at this time. Soon after Mrs. Craigie's death in 1843, the estate was purchased by Mr. Longfellow. Since then the interest in the house on account of its connection with Washington is overshadowed by the associations with our much loved and greatly honored poet. He first occupied the southeast chamber, and it was in this room that all of his poems from 1837 to 1845 were written. Later the room below this on the first floor was used by him as a study, and it remains to-day precisely as the poet left it in 1882. The grounds of the Craigie estate extended to the house on the right-hand side of Brattle street, formerly at the west corner of Sparks street, occupied by John Brewster, which was removed about 1887 or 1888 to the corner of Riedesel avenue. This was the residence of Judge Richard Lechmere, and later in 1771 the home of Judge Jonathan
d. He died in exile at Bristol, England, in 1815. On his departure the house was taken possession of by the Committee of Correspondence. It was next used as a hospital for the men who were wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in the field opposite this and the Fayerweather house those who died in these mansions, temporarily converted into hospitals, were buried. Elmwood then became for three weeks the headquarters for Benedict Arnold and his company of forty men from New Haven. In 1779 it was sold to Andrew Cabot, who eight years later resold the residence to Elbridge Gerry of Marblehead, a well-known patriot and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He afterwards served as governor of Massachusetts, and later still as vice-president of the United States. In 1818 the estate was purchased of Mr. Gerry's widow by Rev. Charles Lowell, who was pastor of the West Church in Cambridge for over forty years. A year later his youngest and most distinguished son,
in the world of letters. As the headquarters of General Washington it will always hold a foremost place among the points of interest in Cambridge. After Washington was appointed commander-in-chief of the American army — he left Philadelphia on the twenty-first of June, 1775, to join the troops whose headquarters were then at Cambridge. He accomplished the whole of the journey on horseback, accompanied from place to place by mounted escorts. He made all possible speed, arriving the second of July at Watertown, where the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts was in session, by which body he was warmly greeted. He then proceeded to the quarters assigned to him in Cambridge. As he approached the camp of the army which occupied about the site of the present common, he was greeted with shouts and the firing of artillery. Congress ordered that all the rooms but one in the house of the president of Harvard College, now standing on Massachusetts avenue between Dane and Boylston Halls a
gned to him in Cambridge. As he approached the camp of the army which occupied about the site of the present common, he was greeted with shouts and the firing of artillery. Congress ordered that all the rooms but one in the house of the president of Harvard College, now standing on Massachusetts avenue between Dane and Boylston Halls and known as the Wadsworth house, should be prepared for the use of General Washington and of General Lee who accompanied him. On the morning of the next day, July 3, the army being drawn up on the com- mon, Washington formally took command under the wide-spreading branches of the venerable tree which will always be associated with this event. In a very short time Washington left the president's house, probably because he considered it too near Boston for safety, as a shell had burst near it shortly before. When he first entered Cambridge he was attracted by the appearance of the house on Tory Row then known as the Vassall place. Upon his indicating
Continental army. The northeast room on the first floor was enlarged and the wooden columns and much of the fine wood carving was added by Craigie. He was greatly interested in the development of East Cambridge, the bridge there still being known by his name. He became involved financially through his speculations, andd during the last years of his life he was virtually a prisoner in his own house. He was liable to arrest for debt if he was seen outside his home on week days, though on Sundays he could go out with no fear of molestation. After his death his widow continued to reside here, helping out her income by letting rooms to students; and Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, Joseph E. Worcester and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow among others occupied rooms in the venerable mansion at this time. Soon after Mrs. Craigie's death in 1843, the estate was purchased by Mr. Longfellow. Since then the interest in the house on account of its connection with Washington is overshadowed by t
sociated with this event. In a very short time Washington left the president's house, probably because he considered it too near Boston for safety, as a shell had burst near it shortly before. When he first entered Cambridge he was attracted by the appearance of the house on Tory Row then known as the Vassall place. Upon his indicating his preference for this estate as his residence, the Committee of Safety immediately ordered it put in readiness for his occupation; and about the middle of July--the exact date is uncertain-he removed to the new headquarters which became his home until he left Cambridge about nine months later. How many troubled hours Washington spent under this roof! Prominent among his causes for anxiety was the fact that the army was short of ammunition, and it was of the greatest importance that the knowledge of this be kept from the invaders. Mrs. Washington arrived in Cambridge from her home in Virginia, Dec. 11, 1775, accompanied by her son and his wife
ere is no evidence of the truth of the legend. On the contrary it is on record that Madame Vassall paid twenty pounds to free the child of their slave Tony. After the war this estate was purchased by Nathaniel Tracy of Newburyport, and later, in 1792, it was bought by Andrew Cragie who also owned the Longfellow house. About fifty years afterwards it came into the possession of Samuel Batchelder, the father of the present proprietors. The Longfellow or Craigie house, the third of these notapaulettes, elegant small sword, and silver-mounted pistols. He left his Cambridge home April 4, 1776, for New York. Thirteen years later when on a visit to Boston he passed through Cambridge and spent about an hour at his old headquarters. In 1792 the Vassall estate was purchased by Andrew Craigie. by whose name it was known for so many years. It was said that he accumulated a fortune when apothecary-general to the Continental army. The northeast room on the first floor was enlarged and
December 11th, 1775 AD (search for this): chapter 6
his occupation; and about the middle of July--the exact date is uncertain-he removed to the new headquarters which became his home until he left Cambridge about nine months later. How many troubled hours Washington spent under this roof! Prominent among his causes for anxiety was the fact that the army was short of ammunition, and it was of the greatest importance that the knowledge of this be kept from the invaders. Mrs. Washington arrived in Cambridge from her home in Virginia, Dec. 11, 1775, accompanied by her son and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Custis. They travelled with a chariot and four, with black postilions in scarlet and white liveries, a Virginian style of that period and one well befitting the rank of the wife of the commander-in-chief. After her arrival, many were the entertainments furnished in the dining-room of the old Vassall house, to the most notable people of the time. The rooms most closely connected with their occupancy are the southeast room on the first
August 21st, 1775 AD (search for this): chapter 6
in order is the Fayerweather house also on the right-hand side of the street, between the Nichols house and Faverweather street, long the residence of William Wells who kept there a well-known school for boys. This structure, built between 1740 and 1750, was first occupied by George Ruggles, who after the trouble with the mother country began, sold the estate in 1774 to Thomas Fayerweather. This house was used as a hospital for the wounded soldiers. In one of the old records we read: August 21, 1775, a sergeant, corporal, and nine men to mount guard to-morrow morning at Mr. Fayerweather's house lately converted into a hospital. The house is now owned by Mr. Newell and is in most excellent preservation, a fine, stately and hospitable mansion as of yore. As famous as Craigie house, and for a similar reason, is Elmwood, the entrance to which is on Elmwood avenue, between Brattle and Mount Auburn streets. This house was built between 1763 and 1767 by Thomas Oliver, the last of th
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