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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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itions to entrap the enemy at Snake Creek Gap. Hood, however, was too quick, for him, and escaped . Sherman, however, was very much in hope that Hood would actually invade Tennessee. On the 16th, General Thomas, he must be able to take care of Hood and destroy him. I really do not see that you cth for Sherman, to intercept reinforcements for Hood, and to concentrate whatever force it was possit so that Sherman might attack him in rear; but Hood eluded the national columns. Sherman, meanwhCroxton and Granger. On the 25th of October, Hood appeared before Decatur in force, for, contrary, and when he reported to Grant the approach of Hood, he also announced: If Rosecrans's troops can rime it was impossible to determine which course Hood would take—advance on Nashville, or turn towardouri to East Tennessee. The very boldness of Hood's movement was calculated to affect the spirit rs: he showed them how Thomas being set to hold Hood, and Sheridan retained to watch Early, while Me[70 more...]
lt feats in war for a pursuing army to overtake its enemy. The stimulus of danger seems always a sharper goad than the hope of victory. Sherman followed as far as Gaylesville, in the rich valley of the Chattooga, and there on the 19th, he determined to pause. The rebels had altogether failed to make him let go his hold of Atlanta, but had demonstrated their ability at all times to endanger the national communications. They had captured, though they could not hold, Big Shanty, Ackworth, Tilton, and Dalton, and destroyed thirty miles of railroad; and although Atlanta was not regained, Hood was actually at this moment threatening the invasion of Tennessee, while Forrest had crossed the Tennessee river, captured Athens, and cut the Nashville and Chattanooga railroad. These movements of the enemy disturbed, but did not change, the plans of the national commanders. On the 10th of October, Sherman said to Thomas, now at Nashville: Hood has crossed the Coosa. . . If he turns to Chatt
railroad from Columbia to Decatur, thence to Stevenson. This will give him much additional force. At the same time Grant planned the transfer of A. J. Smith and Mower's commands from Missouri to Tennessee: If Crook goes to Missouri, he will drive Price out of the country in time to send A. J. Smith and Mower to Tennessee, beforMower to Tennessee, before Hood can get far, even if Sherman's movements do not turn him, as I think they will. Canby's forces also will be relieved for operations, wherever they are needed. But the troops from Missouri were slow in coming, and on the 26th of October, Grant said to Halleck: An order, with an officer to see it enforced, should go to Misl; and has at least 20,000 to 25,000 men, with new regiments and conscripts arriving all the time, also. General Rosecrans promises the two divisions of Smith and Mower belonging to me, but I doubt if they can reach Tennessee in less than ten days. If I were to let go Atlanta and North Georgia, and make for Hood, he would, as he d
A reinforcement of several thousand troops was ordered to New York. But the administration was still not satisfied, and desired Grant to send General Butler to that city until after the election. I am just in receipt of despatch from the Secretary of War, asking me to send more troops to the city of New York, and, if possible, to let you go there until after election. I wish you would start for Washington immediately, and be guided by orders from there in the matter.—Grant to Butler, Nov. 1. Butler was known to be decided in judgment and prompt in action, and would not flinch in executing any measures he deemed necessary at a critical juncture. His name alone would be a terror to those who plotted against the republic. He was accordingly ordered to report to Dix, and the force in New York was temporarily increased by five thousand men. The election took place on the 8th of November, and resulted in the success of Lincoln, who received a majority of more than four hundred
k as far as Knoxville, with a national loss of about two hundred, in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Thomas at once gave directions to Stoneman, at Louisville, and to Steedman at Chattanooga, to reinforce Knoxville. On the 16th, he telegraphed: Ammen reported that he had sent reinforcements to General Gillem. On the 17th: I heard from Steedman this morning that he was preparing last night to reinforce Knoxville, in accordance with my directions. . He will be able to send two thousand men. . . Stoneman telegraphs me, from Louisville, that he can concentrate five mounted regiments in three days, to go to the relief of General Ammen. On the 18th, however, the rebels withdrew as rapidly as they had advanced. Nevertheless, Stoneman was ordered to concentrate as large a force as he could in East Tennessee, and either destroy Breckenridge, or drive him into Virginia. Thus, the enemy was able to make important diversions of national troops at this critical moment, both on the right an
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 4
of Thomas anxiety of government orders for Sherman's march delayed orders renewed harmony of Gne P. M., he renewed his permission, and gave Sherman instructions for his conduct on the road. Ons a sharper goad than the hope of victory. Sherman followed as far as Gaylesville, in the rich vrant was actually preparing and arranging for Sherman's campaign, before Sherman knew that he woulnfront and frustrate such a movement. . . General Sherman will be instructed that no force, except of the night before, he telegraphed again to Sherman: Your despatch of nine A. M. yesterday is jusitory. I say then, go on, as you propose. Sherman was equally prompt in re-asserting his origin, had nothing to do with ordinary politics. Sherman's despatches show that he was as decided in taped into Alabama. During the next two weeks Sherman was following Hood northward, and as the rebehat the Confederacy was a hollow shell, which Sherman was about to penetrate; that old men and boys[119 more...]
by way of that river. In the same despatch he gave directions for the coopera-tion of Canby and Foster, and added: Information should be got to Sherman of all preparations made to meet him on the seareinforcements for the other; who must direct the movements all over the continent, of Canby and Foster and Rosecrans, as well as of Meade and Butler and Sheridan, so that all should contribute to thed be well broken, and as much damage as possible done to the Mobile and Ohio. At the same time, Foster, in South Carolina, was directed to send a force to destroy the railroad in Sherman's front, betugh, they can keep the enemy off of Sherman awhile. These co-operative movements of Canby and Foster suggested themselves to Sherman as well as to Grant, as appears by the records. They were indeere busy conveying forces and stores for the same object; the troops of Rosecrans, and Canby, and Foster, were all in motion, and their operations were all planned, to support the operations of Thomas
E. R. S. Canby (search for this): chapter 4
d Butler, and Sherman, and Sheridan, and Thomas, and Canby, and Stanton, and Halleck, and the President; and afith Sherman, another with Sheridan, and a third with Canby; and during actual movements in front of Petersburg despatch he gave directions for the coopera-tion of Canby and Foster, and added: Information should be got to 's movements do not turn him, as I think they will. Canby's forces also will be relieved for operations, where that already south of the Tennessee and such as General Canby can send, will be used between the Tennessee rimust direct the movements all over the continent, of Canby and Foster and Rosecrans, as well as of Meade and Bu been intercepted, giving Smith positive orders; and Canby was now directed, not only to prevent the crossing of Sherman awhile. These co-operative movements of Canby and Foster suggested themselves to Sherman as well aes for the same object; the troops of Rosecrans, and Canby, and Foster, were all in motion, and their operation
Butler Grant (search for this): chapter 4
ts of President Lincoln personal character of Grant wife and children at City Point military fam Presidential election political position of Grant views in regard to soldiers' vote efforts of change of military situation preparations of Grant to meet Hood geography of Tennessee characteriting was to be done by one of the staff; for Grant wrote few letters himself, only the despatchesmovements in front of Petersburg and Richmond, Grant always had a representative with that army witults which he himself scrupulously avoided. Grant indeed rarely showed vexation at occurrences, opened. Among the despatches thus delayed was Grant's permission of October 11th, for Sherman to mof November, and at six P. M. on the same day, Grant telegraphed to Sherman: Do you not think it ad to start. At 9.30 P. M. of the 2nd, however, Grant's second telegram arrived, and Sherman answere as chief of staff, but intended of course for Grant and the government. I have balanced all the f[72 more...]
To effect this concentration was of course of vital importance; to this consideration all others were secondary. Schofield was accordingly instructed to watch the movements of Hood, and retard his advance as long as possible, without risking a general engagement. Meanwhile, all available troops from every direction were hurried to Thomas. New regiments and recruits poured in on him from the North; convalescents and furloughed men, returning to Sherman's army, were detained at Chattanooga; Pope spared two regiments from the Indian frontier, and Smith was making strenuous efforts to reach Tennessee from the interior of Missouri. But twelve of the new regiments were absorbed in supplying the place in garrison of those whose terms of service had expired; and Smith's arrival was delayed beyond all expectation. The Missouri river was so low that it was thought he could reach the Mississippi sooner by marching than in boats; but after he started, the roads became almost impassable from
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