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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Marston Moor (search for this): chapter 1
ttle With much hypocrisy, his camp was the scene of much real piety; and long afterwards, when his army was disbanded, its members, who, for the most part, were farmers and the sons of farmers, resumed their places among the industrious classes of society; while the soldiers of the royalists were often found in the ranks of vagabonds and beggars. It was the troops of Cromwell that first, in the open field, broke the ranks of the royal squadrons; and the decisive victory 1644. July 2. of Marston Moor was won by the iron energy and valor of the godly saints whom he had enlisted. The final overthrow of the prospects of Charles in 1647. the field, marks the crisis of the struggle for the ascendant between the Presbyterians and Independents. Chap XI.} The former party had its organ in the parliament, the latter in the army, in which the Presbyterian commander had been surprised into a resignation by the self-denying ordinance, and the intrigues of Cromwell. As the duration of the p
r; to Clarendon, the historian, the statesman, the prime minister, who had shown to the colony exceeding great care and love; and to the modest and virtuous Clarke, On Clarke, see Backus, i. 440; Allen's Biog. Dict. The charge of baseness in Grahame, i. 315, is an unwarranted misapprehension. His enemies in Massachusetts disliked his principles and his success they respected his fidelity and his blameless character. Grahame is usually very candid in his judgments. the persevering and disiGrahame is usually very candid in his judgments. the persevering and disinterested envoy, who, during a twelve years mission, had sustained himself by his own exertions and a mortgage on his estate; whose whole life was a continued exercise of benevolence, and who, at his death, be 1676. queathed all his possessions for the relief of the needy, Chap XI.} 1663. and the education of the young. Others have sought office to advance their fortunes; he, like Roger Williams, parted with his little means for the public good. He had powerful enemies in Massachusetts, an
urred to the British parliament that the legislation was a wrong. Bigotry is not exclusively a passion of religious superstition. Its root is in the human heart, and it is reproduced in every age. Chap. XI.} Blinding the intellectual eye, and comprehending no passion but its own, it is the passionate and partial defence of an existing interest. The Antonines of Rome, or, not to go beyond English history, Elizabeth and Charles I., did not question the divine right of absolute power. Were Nero in power, said Cromwell himself, when protector, it would be a duty to submit. When Laud was arraigned, Can any one believe me a traitor? exclaimed the astonished prelate, with real surprise. The Cavaliers, in the civil war, did not doubt the sanctity of the privileges of birth: and now the English parliament, as the instrument of mercantile avarice, had no scruple in commencing the legislation, which, when the colonists grew powerful, was, by the greatest British economist, declared to be
William Penn (search for this): chapter 1
brother with the country between Pemaquid and the St. 1664 Croix. The proprietary rights to New Hampshire and 1677 Maine were revived, with the intent to purchase then Chap. XI.} for the duke of Monmouth. The fine country from Connecticut River to Delaware Bay, tenanted by nearly ten thousand souls, in spite of the charter to 1664. Winthrop, and the possession of the Dutch, was, like part of Maine, given to the duke of York. The charter which secured a large and fertile province to William Penn, and thus invested philanthropy with 1681. executive power on the western bank of the Delaware, was a grant from Charles II. After Philip's war in New England, Mount Hope was hardly rescued from a 1679. courtier, then famous as the author of two indifferent comedies. The grant of Nova Scotia to Sir Thomas Temple was not revoked, while, with the inconsistency of ignorance, Acadia, with indefinite boundaries, was 1667. restored to the French. From the outer cape of Nova Scotia to Flor
Elizabeth (search for this): chapter 1
party obtained a majority, it never, till the colonies gained great strength, occurred to the British parliament that the legislation was a wrong. Bigotry is not exclusively a passion of religious superstition. Its root is in the human heart, and it is reproduced in every age. Chap. XI.} Blinding the intellectual eye, and comprehending no passion but its own, it is the passionate and partial defence of an existing interest. The Antonines of Rome, or, not to go beyond English history, Elizabeth and Charles I., did not question the divine right of absolute power. Were Nero in power, said Cromwell himself, when protector, it would be a duty to submit. When Laud was arraigned, Can any one believe me a traitor? exclaimed the astonished prelate, with real surprise. The Cavaliers, in the civil war, did not doubt the sanctity of the privileges of birth: and now the English parliament, as the instrument of mercantile avarice, had no scruple in commencing the legislation, which, when
Nathaniel Bacon (search for this): chapter 1
e Governor of the jurisdiction of Connecticote, labor with you, that ye would not put them to death? And did he not say unto you, that he would beg it of you on his bare knees, that ye would not do it? p. 157. Master over his own mind, he never regretted the brilliant prospects he had resigned, nor complained of the comparative solitude of New London; a large library Winthrop, II. 20. furnished employment to his mind; the study of nature, according to the principles of the philosophy of Bacon, was his delight; for he had a gift in understanding and art; and his home was endeared by a happy marriage, and many sweet children. His knowledge of human nature was as remarkable as his virtues. He never attempted impracticable things; but, understanding the springs of action, and the principles that control affairs, he calmly and noiselessly succeeded in all that he undertook. The New World was full of his praises; Puritans, and Quakers, and the freemen of Rhode Island, Roger Willi
ense of America. The profit of the one was balanced by the loss of the other. In the sale of their products the colonists were equally injured. The English, being the sole purchasers, could obtain those products at a little less than their fair value. The merchant of Bristol or London was made richer; the planter of Virginia or Maryland was made poorer. No new value was created; one lost what the other gained; and both parties had equal claims to the benevolence of the legislature. Burke. Thus the colonists were wronged, both in their purchases and in their sales; the law cut them with a double edge. The English consumer gained nothing; for the surplus colonial produce was reexported to other nations. The English merchant, and not the English people, profited by the injustice. The English people were sufferers. Not that the undue employment of wealth in the colonial trade occasioned an injurious scarcity in other branches of industry; for the increased productiveness
ament was co-extensive with Chap. XI} 1660 the English empire, but what territories the terms of the act included, they were interpreted to exclude the dominions not of the crown of England. Vaughan's Reports, 170. Compare Tyrwhit and Tyndale's Digest, XIII.—XV. Chalmers, p. 241, is not sustained n his inference. The tax was, also, never levied in the colonies; nor was it understood that the colonies were bound by a statute, unless they were expressly named. Blackstone, i. 107, 108; Chitty on Prerogative, 33. That distinctness was not wanting, when it was required by the interests of English merchants. The Navigation Act of the commonwealth had not been designed to trammel the commerce of the colonies, the convention parliament, the same body which betrayed the liberties of England, by restoring the Stuarts without conditions, now, by the most memorable statute 12 Charles II. c. XVII. in the English maritime code, connected in one act the protection of English shippin
Callender (search for this): chapter 1
ends, demanding a double diligence in guards against oppression, and in the firm support of the good of the people. The instruction of all the people in their rights, he esteemed the creative power of good in the colony; and he adds,— for in his view Christianity established political equality, —You are the unworthiest men upon the earth, if you do lose the liberty wherewith Christ hath made you free in life and glory. The leading printed authorities for early Rhode Island history, are Callender's Century Sermon, Backus's History of the Baptists, and Knowles's Roger Williams. The Mass. Hist. Coll. contain many useful documents, too various to be specially cited. Our Rhode Island Historical Society has published five valuable volumes. Hopkins's History of Providence is not accurate; it is in the Mass. Hist. Coll. Compare, also, Walsh's Appeal, 431, &c. Let me not forget to add the reprints from the Records, and the Commentaries of Henry Bull, of Newport. Besides printed works
John Clarke (search for this): chapter 1
Parliament the 1652 confirmed union of the territories that now constitute the state, he returned to America, leaving John Clarke 165??? to 1664 as the agent of the colony in England. Never did a young commonwealth possess a more faithful friend; faith that the gracious hand of Providence would preserve them in their just rights and privileges. Commission to John Clarke, in Mass. Hist. Coll. XVII. 90, 91. It Chap. XI.} is much in our hearts, they urged in their petition to Charles II. statesman, the prime minister, who had shown to the colony exceeding great care and love; and to the modest and virtuous Clarke, On Clarke, see Backus, i. 440; Allen's Biog. Dict. The charge of baseness in Grahame, i. 315, is an unwarranted misaClarke, see Backus, i. 440; Allen's Biog. Dict. The charge of baseness in Grahame, i. 315, is an unwarranted misapprehension. His enemies in Massachusetts disliked his principles and his success they respected his fidelity and his blameless character. Grahame is usually very candid in his judgments. the persevering and disinterested envoy, who, during a twelv
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