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Due Choiseul (search for this): chapter 18
violators of this engagement; the names of recusant importers were to be published; See Vote in Boston Gazette, 31 July, 1769; 747, 1, 2. and the Acts of Trade themselves came under the consideration of a committee, Frances to the Duke of Choiseul, 8 September, 1769, gives a very good account. Hutchinson's History, III. 252, 253. appointed to prepare a statement of the embarrassments to commerce, growing out of the late regulations. Observations on Several Acts of Parliament, passed iree was gay with flags; and at night a great bonfire was kindled upon Fort Hill. When be reached England, he found that the Ministry had promised Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. the London merchants never to employ him in America again. Frances to Choiseul, 11 August, 1769. And yet he was the Governor whom they had most trusted; for bad men fit bad ends; and the selfish oligarchy by which England was then governed, feeling themselves rebuked by the noble and the free, hated them as dangerous to th
d. At that very time Gage, who had been intrusted with discretionary authority to withdraw the forces from Boston, ordered two regiments to Halifax, and required Bernard's written opinion respecting the proper disposition of the rest. Gage to Mackay, 4 June, 1769; Mackay to Gov. Gage, 12 June. 1769. After some hesitation, Bernard to Gage, 12 June, 1769. and after conferring with his associates, Bernard reported it to be the opinion of all that the removal of the troops at that time woMackay to Gov. Gage, 12 June. 1769. After some hesitation, Bernard to Gage, 12 June, 1769. and after conferring with his associates, Bernard reported it to be the opinion of all that the removal of the troops at that time would have very dangerous consequences; Bernard to Gage, 19 June, 1769. and that it would be quite ruinous to the cause of the Crown to draw them all out of the town of Boston. Two regiments, one in the town, the other at the castle, might be sufficient. Bernard to Gage, 26 June, 1769; Gage to Hillsborough, No. 32. During this secret discussion, the Assembly, Answer of the House of Representatives to the Governor's Message of May 31, 1769, June 13; in Bradford's Massachusetts State Pa
Liberty Tree (search for this): chapter 18
ady to tell every tale and magnify trivial rumors into acts of Treason. He desponded when conciliation prevailed in England. The officers of the army and the navy despised him for his cowardice and duplicity, and did not conceal their contempt. He has essentially served us, said the patriot clergyman Cooper; Cooper to Gov. Pownall, 11 May, 1769. had he been wise, our liberties might have been lost. As he departed from Boston, the bells were rung, and cannon fired from the wharfs; Liberty Tree was gay with flags; and at night a great bonfire was kindled upon Fort Hill. When be reached England, he found that the Ministry had promised Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. the London merchants never to employ him in America again. Frances to Choiseul, 11 August, 1769. And yet he was the Governor whom they had most trusted; for bad men fit bad ends; and the selfish oligarchy by which England was then governed, feeling themselves rebuked by the noble and the free, hated them as dangerous to
Daniel Boon (search for this): chapter 18
companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings him into the world in 1730. Monette, i. 363, gives him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boone in his Narrative does not give the age of the son. young man, of about three and twenty, wandered forth through the wilderness of America, in quest of the country of Kentucky, The Adventures of Col. Daniel Boon, formerly a Hunter, &c. &c. dictated by himself to John Filson. known to the Savages as the Dark and Bloody Ground, the Middle Ground between the subjects of the Five Nations and the Cherokees. Filson in Imlay's Topographical Description of the Western Territory; Third Ed. 308. After a long and fatiguing journey through mountain ranges, the party found themselves in June on the Red River, a tributary of the Kentucky, and from the top of an eminence surveyed with delight the beauti fu
Province, was an absolute power. Bernard, whose chief anxiety was to get a grant of a year's salary, Hutchinson to Bollan, 13 June, 1769. and who, for the moment, mixed Chap XLI.} 1769. May. some distrust of Hutchinson I. Williams of Hatfield to Hutchinson, 3 May, 1769. with his sudden recall, met their complaint of the presence of troops by adjourning the Legislature to Cambridge; and insisting that by the King's instruction the grant of salaries must be the first Act of the Sessionaving completed his pecuniary arrangements with Hutchinson to his own satisfaction, For the preceding jealousy of Bernard, see Andrew Oliver to Hutchinson, 22 June, 1769. Letters passed between Hutchinson and Bernard. Compare I. Williams of Hatfield to T. Hutchinson, 3 May, 1769. on the evening of the last day of July left Boston to sail for Europe. He was to have sent home whom he pleased, said the Boston- Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. eers; but the die being thrown, poor Sir Francis Bernard
s of Treason. He desponded when conciliation prevailed in England. The officers of the army and the navy despised him for his cowardice and duplicity, and did not conceal their contempt. He has essentially served us, said the patriot clergyman Cooper; Cooper to Gov. Pownall, 11 May, 1769. had he been wise, our liberties might have been lost. As he departed from Boston, the bells were rung, and cannon fired from the wharfs; Liberty Tree was gay with flags; and at night a great bonfire waCooper to Gov. Pownall, 11 May, 1769. had he been wise, our liberties might have been lost. As he departed from Boston, the bells were rung, and cannon fired from the wharfs; Liberty Tree was gay with flags; and at night a great bonfire was kindled upon Fort Hill. When be reached England, he found that the Ministry had promised Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. the London merchants never to employ him in America again. Frances to Choiseul, 11 August, 1769. And yet he was the Governor whom they had most trusted; for bad men fit bad ends; and the selfish oligarchy by which England was then governed, feeling themselves rebuked by the noble and the free, hated them as dangerous to their rule. Aristotle's Politics, v. c. IX. While
Robert Auchmuty (search for this): chapter 18
ousand men had been sent, in equal disregard of good policy Mahon's England, v. 406. and of an Act of Parliament. For more than ten months, the Colony remained without an Assembly. The servants of the Crown who had placed their Feb. hopes on the plan for transporting to England the principal Sons of Liberty, became irresolute and timid. Hutchinson's Hist. III. 223. The secret Councils which Bernard now held with Hutchinson Bernard to Hillsborough, 25 May, 1769. and Oliver and Auchmuty, ended only in despair. They had furnished ample information; Hutchinson's History. they had got ready to apply the statute of Henry the Eighth; and had persuaded themselves that inferior offenders would have consulted safety by betraying their leaders. Bernard to Hillsborough, 25 May, 1769. Since the propo- Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. sal to ship Samuel Adams, Otis, and their chief supporters across the water had come to naught, the cabal were left without a plan of conduct. The Regi
, John F. Schermerhorn's Report concerning the Indians inhabiting the Western Parts of the United States; Mass. Hist. Coll. XII. 8. and their beautiful and fertile plains, cooled during the summer by the ever blowing West wind, were left vacant for the white man. Connecticut which at this time was exercising a disputed jurisdiction in the valley of Wyoming, Compare Minutes of the Provincial Council, in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a company of military Adventurers, headed by one of its most intelligent sons, Timothy Dwight's Travels in New England and New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the M
Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's
Don Alexander O'Reilly (search for this): chapter 18
When near the end of July, it was told that O'Reilly had arrived at the Balise with an overwhelminI s'acquittat parfaitement de sa commission. O'Reilly to Grimaldi, N. O. 31 Aug. 1769. If you submiists, and Milhet for the merchants, waited on O'Reilly at the Balise, to recognise his authority andenterprise. Aubry to O'Reilly, 20 August. O'Reilly to Grimaldi, 31 August, 1769. It was not easy to arrest them, wrote O'Reilly; but I contrived to cheat their vigilance. On the twenty-first he r, they showed signs of anxiety. For me, says O'Reilly, I now had none for the success of my plan. accused were conducted with ostentation from O'Reilly's presence to separate places of confinement;had not shared in the revolution, appealed to O'Reilly for mercy; but without effect. Tradition wilf an executioner, were shot. At length, said O'Reilly, the insult done to the King's dignity and auevenge. In the several parishes of Louisiana O'Reilly was received with silence and submission. Th[4 more...]
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