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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

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Some notes of the history of Medford from 1801 to 1851. read before the Medford Historical Society. by Hon. Thomas S. Harlow. I have been requested to speak of the history of Medford during the first half of the present century. An old writer once said, Happy are the people who have no history. This is only another mode of expressing the quiet happiness of the calm, contented life in which so many of our New England towns moved on, with little to record and little to disturb them. Not being a native of Medford, and not yet a centenarian, I can hardly be expected to have any personal recollection of the early portion of the half-century. My sources of information are the same that are accessible to most of you, the town records, the history of Medford so carefully prepared by Rev. Charles Brooks, and the traditions and recollections of the few survivors of that early time. Alas, they are but few! Of the few with whom I became acquainted on my first visit to Medford, more
t took an active part; but the period at which its brave and patriotic services were performed covers a later date than that assigned to me to record. I can only say that their valor, their devotion, the patience and the courage with which they underwent the hardships and encountered the dangers of the war, were beyond all praise, and will ever be held in grateful remembrance by their townsmen and their country. I have spoken of Governor Brooks. It was once my good fortune to see him. In 1819, when he was governor and the district (now State) of Maine was a part of Massachusetts, he came down among us to attend, in his capacity of commander-in-chief, the annual militia musters. My father then lived at Castine, and the muster-field was about three miles from the village. He took me, then a lad of hardly seven years, with him, and we walked to the muster. He pointed out to me the governor as he galloped across the field at full speed—alone—to rectify some irregularity, upon a bl
Some notes of the history of Medford from 1801 to 1851. read before the Medford Historical Society. by Hon. Thomas S. Harlow. I have been requested to speak of the history of Medford during the first half of the present century. An old writer once said, Happy are the people who have no history. This is only another mode of expressing the quiet happiness of the calm, contented life in which so many of our New England towns moved on, with little to record and little to disturb them. Nm, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen pr
rolled in the militia company under the command of Capt. John Sparrell, whom some of my elder hearers may remember, and who appeared at the muster that autumn at the head of a company of one hundred and ninety-six rank and file. Medford, I think, has never mustered so large a company since, for the duty was considered irksome and was evaded when possible. This company was succeeded by the Brooks Phalanx in 1841, which was dissolved in 1849, and was succeeded by the Lawrence Light Guard in 1854. This company was well organized and in a good state of discipline at the time of the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion, in which, under its commander, Capt. John Hutchins, it took an active part; but the period at which its brave and patriotic services were performed covers a later date than that assigned to me to record. I can only say that their valor, their devotion, the patience and the courage with which they underwent the hardships and encountered the dangers of the war, were
room for the house occupied by J. Manning. After she left, the house was taken by Mr. John Angier, who kept a boarding-school there for many years, and had scholars from other States and from the West Indies. The Misses Bradbury kept an excellent school for young ladies, boarders and others, on South street. Mrs. Russell, mother of the late Governor Russell, told me she attended school there. During the first half of the century, and until the fourteenth amendment of the Constitution in 1855, a majority of voters, instead of a plurality as now, was required for the election of any public officer. The consequence often was that for many public offices there was a failure to elect. For the governor and senators a mode was prescribed for filling the vacancy, but for representatives, if the people failed to make a choice, they were left unrepresented. As the law then stood, if they failed to elect on the first day they could adjourn to the next day. Upon a second failure they coul
December, 1822 AD (search for this): chapter 21
dual, and at first almost imperceptible. Some of the older ministers were observed to dwell less in their sermons upon the five points of Calvinism and more upon religion as a life rather than a mode of belief, and a greater liberality of thought was allowed. The stricter orthodox became uneasy, and in many of the older churches the division began. Dr. David Osgood was settled in 1774 over what was then the only church in Medford, and continued to be the pastor till his decease, in December, 1822. Undoubtedly, at the time of his settlement, his creed was what was then deemed strictly orthodox, and in a written statement containing his doctrinal views, on accepting the call, he acknowledged his belief in the doctrines specified in the assembly's catechism, which doctrines, said he, I am bound to profess, and as a preacher to teach and inculcate. The opposition to his settlement was very small, and seemed to come from those who were called Arminians, and was founded upon his beli
e settlement of Rev. B. B. Wisner over the Old South Church. He took no active part in the long examination of the candidate, but when the others had finished he said to the candidate, Young man, do you really believe in all this that you have stated? The answer was of course in the affirmative. Well, well, said the doctor, if you live to be as old as I am you won't believe more than half of it. But the sleeping embers of dissent and disunion were soon kindled after his death. Early in 1823 a call was made upon the Rev. Andrew Bigelow to become the pastor. This call of course was made by the town, the primary authority, as has been shown, but was far from unanimous, the vote being ninety-five to seventy, and the call was concurred in by the church. There is no record of the ground of the opposition, though it was undoubtedly made by Trinitarians as against Unitarians. The salary offered was $800. Dr. Osgood never received over $533.33, viz., £ 100, lawful money ($333.33), and
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