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Royal, was adopted. The Judiciary Committee reported that Mr. Starke, the Senator from Oregon, whose loyalty has been questioned was entitled to take the constitutional oath. A minority report was, however, presented, and the papers were ordered to be printed. In the House of Representatives, the Treasury Note bill was by consent amended so as to allow the Treasury Department, at its option, to pay the interest on Government bonds in coin or paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, the late Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guards in Missouri and Maryland, was agreed to. Several private bills wer
e present month, therefore, with any improvement upon the late blockading snows, thaws, and rains, we expect to hear the glorious news of the expulsion of the rebels from both Columbus and Bowling Green. A rebel army, including both places, of over a hundred and twenty thousand men, will thus be cut up and dispersed, Kentucky and Tennessee will be instantly liberated, and the sustaining spirit of this rebellion will be completely broken. In the interval, however, we do not imagine that Price and his guerillas will be left on the soil of Missouri; or that the Burnside expedition will be confined to reconnaissances of the inland waters of North Carolina; or that the powerful fleet of Dupont and the co-operating land forces of Sherman will be idle; or that our land and naval forces in Florida and on Ship Island, within convenient distance of New Orleans and Mobile. Will remain resting upon their oars; or that Gen. Wool will be limited to the daily routine of Fortress Monroe; or th
McClellan (search for this): article 4
bels in that quarter. Meantime, in accordance with the instructions of Gen. McClellan, the army of Gen. Buell is steadily encircling the great rebel camp at Bowlk, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Portern assuming the complete direction of the affairs of the army, and confining Gen. McClellan to the command of the Army of the Potomac. In yesterday's Tribune we againby an attack on the General-in-Chief in the Post. The Tribune says: General McClellan's New Rank.--The better opinion is that General McClellan will not resignGeneral McClellan will not resign in consequence of the change which the censor allowed us partially to indicate last night, but will strive in the Department of the Potomac to rival General Buell ie meanest kind of journalism, says the Herald. Failing to directly affect General McClellan's position with the President and the country, it seeks to curtail his fu
Beauregard (search for this): article 4
on's Old Guard, have marched into the occupation of the valuable strategic defences of Fort Henry on the Tennessee river. Our troops occupy a good position at Fort Henry from which to advance westward upon Columbus, or eastward upon Bowling Green, in the rear — the two strongholds of the rebels in Western Kentucky, and upon the maintenance of which depends the rebel cause, not only in Kentucky and Tennessee, but along the whole line of the Mississippi down to New Orleans. This is why Beauregard has been transferred from Manassas to Columbus or Bowling Green; for the rebels have discovered that their immediate danger is more pressing on the line of the Mississippi than on the line of the Potomac. We suppose that the next thing in order by our troops at Fort Henry will be the reduction of the supporting Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland river, at Dover, some ten miles across the hills at this point from the Tennessee; and, next, that those railroads will be occupied which connect t
Alexander Cummings (search for this): article 4
of the nation for a moment stood still; advantage was taken of its trembling necessities by speculators. He spoke of the cattle contract made in this city, whereby fifty thousand dollars was realized on two thousand head; of the agency of Alexander Cummings, in New York; of the immense amount of money paid to him without any vouchers of his purchase; of linen pantaloons, London porter, Scotch ale, and Dutch herring, for the use of the army. He next spoke of the character of the steamer Catalnment bonds in coin or paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, the late Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guar
with the rebels in Virginia; and that then, as all that section of Kentucky lying between the Cumberland and the Mississippi is attached to the department of General Halleck, there will be, under his direction, a combined movement of all his disposable forces from Fort Henry, Mayfield, Paducah, Smithland, and Cairo, including Comm distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is e change which the censor allowed us partially to indicate last night, but will strive in the Department of the Potomac to rival General Buell in Kentucky and General Halleck in Missouri, on a level with whom the new arrangement places him. It is understood that he has consulted with several of his Generals respecting the course pr
February 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 4
War Matters. From the latest Southern and Northern files received, we make up the following summary of interesting war news: Reported riot at Norfolk — Development of the Union sentiment. Philadelphia, Feb. 7, 1862. --The Inquirer of this city has a dispatch saying that a riot occurred at Norfolk on Tuesday night; that it was supposed that martial law would be proclaimed, and that during the disturbance cheers for the Union were given. Philadelphia, Feb. 7, 1862. --The diFeb. 7, 1862. --The dispatch about the reported riot at Norfolk is incorrect. It was stated that the riot occurred at Richmond, not at Norfolk. Washington items. Washington dispatches, under date of the 7th inst., say: Effect of the news of the progress of the Union forces. The news to-day of the triumphant progress of the Union arms on the Tennessee river, in Pamlico Sound, and on the Upper Potomac, has caused great rejoicing. It is regarded, however, as only the first faint muttering of the terri
July, 2 AD (search for this): article 4
of the Cabinet. A difference of opinion, however, exists as to the form and details of such government. A number of propositions have been submitted, some of which will be forwarded to the Herald by mail. A majority of the Cabinet are in favor of the establishment of civil government under the protection of the military power, as at Port Roal and in other places in the South where the Union flag has lately been unfurled again. The recent flag of truce from the rebels. Washington, Feb. 7. --There is the highest authority for stating that there is no truth in the report that the recent rebel flag of truce brought to headquarters here a communication threatening the lives of the hostages, Col. Corcoran and others, in the event of the execution of the Missouri bridge burners. There is in the communication no allusion whatever to that subject, and it is not believed that the contents will be officially made public. Another Senatorial inquiry probable. The expuls
April 19th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
n of Congress, in its seasonable legislation to relieve the financial embarrassments of the Government and the country. Speech of Mr. Van Wyck in Congress — important Developments. The following remarks were submitted by Mr. Van Wyck in the Federal House of Representatives, on the 7th inst.: Mr. Van Wyck, (Rep) of New York, moved the consideration of the report; of the Committee on Government Contracts, and addressed the House, referring to the tragedy at Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861, when the pulse of the nation for a moment stood still; advantage was taken of its trembling necessities by speculators. He spoke of the cattle contract made in this city, whereby fifty thousand dollars was realized on two thousand head; of the agency of Alexander Cummings, in New York; of the immense amount of money paid to him without any vouchers of his purchase; of linen pantaloons, London porter, Scotch ale, and Dutch herring, for the use of the army. He next spoke of the c
ge in our present army organization, which many might be disposed to favor, under the mistaken notion that it was based on the results of English military experience. Sad Effects of the War upon Newspapers. The New York Herald, of the 8th inst., says editorially: We have it upon the highest authority, no less than that of the Tribune itself, that that journal has been losing money ever since the beginning of the war. We now learn that the owners, some thirty of them, all with lothe Tribune --it makes no matter which. By this arrangement both will probably disappear some fine morning before the end of the war, and never be heard of again. "Treachery of the rebels to one another." The New York Herald, of the 8th instant, says: By our latest reports from Paducah, it appears that General Grant and Gen. Smith were pursuing the flying rebels, to the amount of four or five thousand, on each side of the river, and it was reported that many of the garrison of
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