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George W. Young (search for this): chapter 29
often interrupted. Only one Army steamer was disabled during the siege operations, and six or seven men killed on board of her. When the whole of our Army was in the rear of Vicksburg, with the exception of a small force at Young's Point under General Mower, and that place was attacked by Major-General Price with 12,000 men, the marine brigade and the gun-boats united with General Mower's force to put the Confederates down, which was effectually done; and General Grant was satisfied that Young's Point would be taken care of by the Navy, while he was engaged in reducing the monster on the east bank of the Mississippi. When the Army and Navy started out to capture Vicksburg the Mississippi was closed against the Federal forces from Helena to Port Hudson. This latter place fell shortly after the surrender of Vicksburg and the river was thus open to the sea. There was no longer a doubt that the rebellious states were divided, and that the uninterrupted navigation of the father
David D. Porter (search for this): chapter 29
t by the Confederates on the Mississippi. Admiral Porter opens communication with General Grant in ast words of Grant. detailed report of Rear-Admiral Porter. congratulatory letter of Secretary Weurg, and was well on the way to Vicksburg, Admiral Porter changed his station from Grand Gulf to theces. On the evening of the 21st of May, Admiral Porter received a communication from General Granet had joined the squadron and reported to Admiral Porter. This organization consisted of about twocess attend my efforts or not, I know that Admiral Porter will ever accord to me the exhibition of aiver or see a gun-boat but I will think of Admiral Porter, Captain Breese, and the many elegant and very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Acting Rear-Admiral, Commanding Mississiton, D. C. Congratulatory letter to Rear--Admiral Porter on the surrender of Vicksburg. Naeon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron, V[3 more...]
J. H. Benton (search for this): chapter 29
tteries from 9.30 to 10.30 A. M., to annoy the garrison and draw off as many as possible from the trenches. In the meantime the Admiral with the Benton, Tuscumbia, Carondelet. and Mound City opened on the hill batteries and silenced them one after another, and the Mound City had the honor of disabling the heaviest gun the enemy had mounted, called Whistling Dick, a gun that had hitherto defied the best marksmen. Whistling Dick. (Sketched by Rear-Admiral Walke from a photograph by Paymaster Benton.) The Confederates did not stand to their guns this day as they had been accustomed to do. They were receiving a heavy fire in the rear as well as in front, and the shriek of the shells from the army field-pieces, as they fell by the hundred in the Confederate works, could be heard down on the water amid the roar of the heavy cannon. The batteries one after another were silenced, as the gunboats, boats, firing bow and broadside guns, moved upon them until they came to the 13-gun ba
F. M. Ramsay (search for this): chapter 29
overed by the aid of glasses that General Sherman's division was coming in on the left of Snyder's Bluff, cutting off the enemy at that place from joining the troops in the city. The DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, the Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander Ramsay, the Linden, Romeo, and Forest Rose, all under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Breese, were now sent up the Yazoo to open communication with the Army. In three hours, letters were received by the Admiral from Generals Grant, Shermck and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfu
ad to subsist on what provisions they had on hand, which was not much, and unless relieved by a superior force a month more or less would bring about a surrender It was not likely that the siege would be raised, for if the Federal Army, with all the disadvantages under which it labored, could manage to dispose of an enemy 80,000 strong in a country where the latter occupied all the strong positions, it could prevent the escape of that portion of them which had been driven into the city. U. S. Gun-boat Cincinnati sunk by the upper water battery at Vicksburg, May 27, 1863. (from a pen-and-ink sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke.) It is not the province of the writer to give an account of the military operations of the siege of Vicksburg; this book is mostly confined to the naval operations, and he is not sufficiently informed on the subject to do full justice to the movements of the Army. He knows enough, however, to be satisfied that everything was done by the generals of our Army in
J. G. Foster (search for this): chapter 29
Lieutenant-Commanders Phelps and Fitch have each had command of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, and have shown themselves to be most able officers. I feel no apprehension at any time with regard to movements in that quarter. Had it not been for the activity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the
G. E. Mc-Pherson (search for this): chapter 29
time when the last ration should be served out. On the 26th of June, this was the condition of affairs in the city. The gun-boats were by turns throwing shells day and night; the mortars kept up an incessant bombardment. which if it damaged no works demoralized the enemy's troops; a constant fire from the Army and Navy guns in the rear was kept up, day and night, and a 6-inch rifle battery taken from the gun-boats was served with great skill by General McArthur on the left flank. General Mc-Pherson had blown up what was called the citadel of the Confederate works, and mounted on the debris four 9-inch guns from the squadron, and some rifled 30-pounders. These guns now commanded a large portion of the enemy's works, and when they opened fire the requiem of Vicksburg was sung by the shrieking shell, as they flew through the air carrying death and destruction all over the city. On the 4th of July, 1863, that historic day was rendered more memorable by the surrender of Vicksbur
George W. Brown (search for this): chapter 29
g the Black Hawk into action against the enemy's batteries, he has not hesitated to do so, though she is not fortified exactly for such a purpose. His long range guns have done most excellent service at different times. I beg leave to mention the different commanders of the light draughts who have carried out my orders ders promptly, aided in keeping guerillas from the river, convoyed transports safely, and kept their vessels in good condition for service, viz: Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George W. Brown, commanding Forest Rose; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. Dominey, commanding Signal; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant J. H. Hurd, commanding Covington; Ensign Win. C. Hanford, commanding Robb; Acting-Master J. C. Bunner, commanding New Era; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Pierce, commanding Petrel; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone, commanding Romeo; Acting-Master W. E. Fentress, commanding Rattler; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. E. Smith, commanding Linden; Acting-Volunteer-L
Alexander M. Pennock (search for this): chapter 29
ned if their aid could effect it. With such officers and the able general who commanded the Army I have not feared for the result, though it has been postponed longer than I thought it would be. First and foremost, allow me to speak of Captain Pennock, fleet captain and commandant of station at Cairo. To him I am much indebted for the promptness with which he has kept the squadron supplied with all that was required or could be procured. His duty has been no sinecure. and he has perfand and Tennessee Rivers, and have shown themselves to be most able officers. I feel no apprehension at any time with regard to movements in that quarter. Had it not been for the activity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichet
Thomas E. Smith (search for this): chapter 29
n for service, viz: Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George W. Brown, commanding Forest Rose; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. Dominey, commanding Signal; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant J. H. Hurd, commanding Covington; Ensign Win. C. Hanford, commanding Robb; Acting-Master J. C. Bunner, commanding New Era; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Pierce, commanding Petrel; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone, commanding Romeo; Acting-Master W. E. Fentress, commanding Rattler; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. E. Smith, commanding Linden; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. C. Brennan, commanding Prairie Bird; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. Goudy, commanding Queen City. There are others who deserve commendation, but these seem to be the most prominent. The action of the 4th of July, at Helena, wherein the Taylor participated so largely, has already been reported to the Department. There is no doubt left in the minds of any, but that the Taylor saved Helena, for, though General Prentiss fought wit
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