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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 15
ng the Atchafalaya fight at Carney's bridge Farragut passes the batteries at Port Hudson Banks reice. And that was the sum of his spoils --Com. Farragut, soon after, sending vessels to reestablis, wounding 7, and taking 26 prisoners. Admiral Farragut, having heard of our loss of the Queen ofn the Rebel pickets, to the rear of the Port; Farragut having intended, under cover of a land attack May 2. through the gunboat Arizona, with Admiral Farragut, at the mouth of that stream. And now a sland. Gen. Banks had been notified by Admiral Farragut, while at Brashear City, that Gen. Grant-l garrison of Port Hudson, of whose batteries Farragut had recently had so sore an experience; to saefforts thenceforth to digging and battering; Farragut still cooperating to make the slumbers of then double that number at most; and, so long as Farragut held the mastery of the river, this was not en. Franklin; the naval force, detailed by Admiral Farragut, consisting of the gunboats Clifton, Sach[2 more...]
Fitz-John Porter (search for this): chapter 15
of this region; but he entered Opelousas in triumph on the same day April 20. that our gunboats. under Lt.-Com'g A. P. Cooke, captured Butte à la Rose, opening the Atchafalaya to Red river; so that communication was reestablished, May 2. through the gunboat Arizona, with Admiral Farragut, at the mouth of that stream. And now a new advance was rapidly made May 5-9. by our army to Alexandria; Taylor, evacuating Fort De Russy, again retreating on Shreveport without a fight; while Admiral Porter came up the river with his fleet, and Louisiana, save its north-west corner, was virtually restored, or subjugated, as you will. Gen. Banks sent Weitzel, with a part of his army, on the track of the flying Rebels, nearly to Grand Ecore; when Taylor's force was so reduced that it did not seem worth farther pursuit; and he was unable to retake the field for weeks. Banks reports his captures in this campaign at 2,000 prisoners and 22 guns; while he had seized 2 and destroyed 8 Rebel steam
N. J. T. Dana (search for this): chapter 15
rises Brashear City fighting at Donaldsonville Franklin attacks Sabine Pass, and is beaten off Dana surprised at Morganzia Burbridge surprised near Opelonsas Gen. Banks embarks for the Rio Grande-Col. Rose. The cavalry escaped with a loss of five men. We had 14 killed and 40 wounded. Gen. N. J. T. Dana had just succeeded Herron in command at Morganzia. In order to mask his intended moveme Banks's new expedition, 6,000 strong, led by Banks himself, but more immediately commanded by Gen. Dana, made Oct. 26. directly for the Rio Grande, debarking Nov. 2. at Brazos Santiago, drivins against blockade-runners: as it was, he felt obliged to desist and return to New Orleans. Gen. Dana. after Banks had left him in command at Brownsville, sent an expedition up the river 120 miles this direction. The Rebels had shifted their Mexican trade to Eagle Pass, 350 miles up, whither Dana was unable to follow them. Being afterward ordered to Pass Cavallo, he found Jan. 12, 1864. t
inally agreed July 8. upon, whereby the garrison became prisoners of war; our forces entering and taking formal possession next morning; when thousands of the victors and the vanquished met and fraternized rather as friends who had been temporarily estranged, than as enemies so lately confronted in mortal strife. Gen. Banks does not report his aggregate loss in this siege; but it can hardly have fallen short, in the entire 45 days, of 3,000 men; including, beside those already named, Cols. Bean, 4th Wise., Holcomb, 1st La., Smith, 160th N. Y. (Zouaves), Lt.-Cols. Lowell, 8th N. H., Rodman, 38th Mass., and other valued officers. Brig.-Gen. Paine was wounded in the assault of June 14th. Banks says the Rebels admitted a loss during the siege of 610 only; but he is confident that it could not have been less than 800 to 1,000; as he found 500 wounded in the hospitals — most of them severely in the head, by the bullets of our sharp-shooters. His prisoners captured in the Port (the s
Berry Hagin (search for this): chapter 15
have been shelling our breastworks, but no damage done. It is very disagreeable sitting in these dirty ditches — but this the Confederate solder expects and bears cheerfully; but another long hot day has passed, and who knows what may be our situation at this time to-morrow evening? June 9.--The Yanks attempted a charge last evening but was repulsed. Whistling Dick is at work to-day; it has played a full hand, too. Whistling Dick is tearing our camps all to pieces. Charley Dixon and Berry Hagin was wounded by fragments of our cook shelter, which was shot down. Our sick has been removed to the ravine. It is difficult to get something to eat. The Yankee artillery is playing upon us all around. The Heshians burned our commissary with a shell to-day. June 10.--Another day and night has passed, and this poor, worn-out garrison has received no assistance. We have lain in the ditches twenty days, and still there is no prospect of succor — but I truly hope we will soon receive re
J. J. Phillips (search for this): chapter 15
but were soon shelled out by the gunboat Winona. Green next attempted June 28, 1 A. M. to carry Donaldsonville by assault; but Farragut had been seasonably apprised of his intention, and had sent thither the Princess Royal, Kineo, and Winona; which, cooperating with the little garrison (225) of the 28th Maine, Maj. Bullen, tore the assaulting column with their shells, and soon put the Rebels to flight, with a loss of 200 killed and wounded, and 124 prisoners. Among their killed was Col. Phillips. Pollard reports another fight, July 12. six miles from Donaldsonville, between 1,200 Texans, under Green, and the enemy, over 4,000 strong; wherein we were beaten, with a loss of 500 killed and wounded, 300 prisoners, 3 guns, many small arms, and the flag of a New York regiment. Banks's report is silent with regard to this fight; yet it seems that a collision actually took place; the forces on our side being commanded by Gen. Dudley, and our loss considerable--450 killed and woun
, with his army not far away, were its main defenses. Moving north instead of east, Taylor's van, under Green, menaced Donaldsonville, while a small force of Texans, raiding into Plaquemine, burned two steamboats lying there, and took 68 convalescents prisoners; but were soon shelled out by the gunboat Winona. Green next attempted June 28, 1 A. M. to carry Donaldsonville by assault; but Farragut had been seasonably apprised of his intention, and had sent thither the Princess Royal, Kineo, and Winona; which, cooperating with the little garrison (225) of the 28th Maine, Maj. Bullen, tore the assaulting column with their shells, and soon put the Rebels to flight, with a loss of 200 killed and wounded, and 124 prisoners. Among their killed was Col. Phillips. Pollard reports another fight, July 12. six miles from Donaldsonville, between 1,200 Texans, under Green, and the enemy, over 4,000 strong; wherein we were beaten, with a loss of 500 killed and wounded, 300 prisoners,
f 2,000 Banks presses the siege second attack the Rebel supplies exhausted Gardner surrenders Dick Taylor surprises Brashear City fighting at Donaldsonville Fwith 3,500 men from Baton Rouge, in like manner invested it on the south. Gen. Gardner, commanding at Port Hudson, sent Col. Miles to resist their junction behind endeavoring to make his way out through our lines with a letter in cipher from Gardner to Jo. Johnston, gives the most vivid inside view of the siege: May 29.-hancellorsville — might dispatch a corps of veterans by rail for the relief of Gardner and his important post. The Rebel line of defense was three or four miles loning down the river which would render holding out impossible. That evening, Gardner summoned a council of his six highest subordinates, who unanimously decided th reply, inclosed him Gen. Grant's letter, announcing the surrender; whereupon, Gardner applied for a cessation of hostilities, with a view to negotiations as to term
id not, and could not: but there had been so much incredulity avowed as to negro courage, so much wit lavished on the idea of negroes fighting to any purpose, that Gen. Banks was justified in according especial commendation to these; saying, No troops could be more determined or more daring. The conflict closed about sunset. We lost in this desperate struggle 293 killed, including Cols. Clarke, 6th Michigan, D. S. Cowles, 128th New York (transfixed by a bayonet), Payne, 2d Louisiana, and Chapin, 30th Mass., with 1,549 wounded, among whom were Gen. T. W. Sherman, severely, and Gen. Neal Dow, slightly. The Rebel loss was of course much less — probably not 300 in all. Gen. Banks reported that the 15th Arkansas, out of a total of 292, lost during the siege 132; of whom 76 fell this day. There was a truce next day to enable us to bury our dead; after which, our soldiers addressed themselves in sober earnest to the arduous labor of digging and battering their way into the works w
of the Bay. It is the natural focus of the commerce of the larger, more fertile, more populous half of Texas, and by far the most considerable place in the State; having had, in 1860, regular lines of steamers running to New York, to New Orleans, and to the smaller Texan ports down the coast, with a population of 5,000, a yearly export of nearly half a million bales of cotton, and a very considerable trade. Plunged, with the rest of the State, into the whirlpool of Secession, it had many Unionists among its people, who welcomed the reappearance of the old flag when their city, after being once idly summoned May 17, 1862. to surrender, was at length occupied, Oct. 8. without resistance, by a naval force consisting of four steam gunboats under Commander Renshaw--the Rebel municipal as well as military authorities retiring to the main land. The possession thus easily acquired was as easily maintained to the close of that year: Gen. Banks, at the request of Renshaw, sending dow
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