hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benjamin F. Butler 1,260 10 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 1,168 12 Browse Search
United States (United States) 1,092 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 694 24 Browse Search
David D. Porter 362 4 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 358 8 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 335 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 333 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 308 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 282 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. Search the whole document.

Found 898 total hits in 151 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Charles Henry Warren (search for this): chapter 16
is advantage of position, and that he would wait an attack behind his works. I therefore determined to push on, and put my whole force between him and Richmond, and orders were at once issued for a movement by his right flank. On the night of the 7th, the march was commenced towards Spottsylvania Court-House, the Fifth Corps moving on the most direct road. But the enemy, having become apprised of our movement, and having the shorter line, was enabled to reach there first. On the 8th, General Warren met a force of the enemy which had been sent out to oppose and delay his advance, to gain time to fortify the line taken up at Spottsylvania. This force was steadily driven back on the main force, within the recently constructed works, after considerable fighting, resulting in severe loss to both sides. On the morning of the 9th, General Sheridan started on a raid against the enemy's lines of communication with Richmond. The 9th, 10th, and 11th were spent in manoeuvring and fighting w
ed in those despatches had been true! General Grant, in his report (page 7), gives a very different account of the operations of yesterday (the 12th), as will be seen by the following;-- The 9th, 10th, and 11th were spent in manoeuvring and fighting, without decisive results. . . . Early on the morning of the 2th a general attack was made on the enemy in position. The Second Corps, Major-General Hancock commanding, carried a salient of his line, capturing most of Johnson's division of Elwell's Corps and twenty pieces of artillery. But the resistance was so obstinate that the advantage gained did not prove decisive. The 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th were consumed in manoeuvring and awaiting the arrival of reinforcements from Washington. Believing the information to be true I sent a despatch at 7 P. M. to General Ames, who was watching the enemy at Petersburg, General Butler's horse. enclosing glorious news from Grant, and asking him to guard against surprise and
ed were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was granted. On the morning of the 10th I received advices by signal from General Kautz announcing his return with his entire command. He had failed to reach Hicksford, but had burned the Stony Creek bridge, the Nottoway Bridge, and Jarratt's Station, and captured about one hundred and thirty prisoners, with a loss to his command of about thirty, killed and wounded. See Appendix No. 45. Wishing to have the assistance of General Kautz's cavalry in the contemplated movement I gave them rest, and to put the lines in the best possible order to be held with a small force, I rested on the 11th, making ready to move by daylight on the 12th. On the 11th th
eneral Peck that the enemy were preparing to attack Plymouth. General Wessels, in command there, however, whose gallant defence of the place is applauded, gave me his belief that the post could be held, if the navy could hold the river. Commander Flusser (who was a Farragut, wanting thirty years experience, and no higher praise can be given) was sure that he could meet the rebel iron-clad ram, and laughed to scorn the idea of her driving out his gunboats. An attack was made in the night of the 19th of April, by the rebel ram. Flusser was killed by the recoil of a shell from a gun fired by his own hands; the Southfield was sunk; the Miami partially disabled and the rest of our fleet driven out of the Roanoke; the rebel gunboats commanded the town, and Plymouth, after a brave defence, was captured with some sixteen hundred men and considerable provisions. By direction of the lieutenant-general, I ordered Washington, N. C., to be evacuated, and the troops sent to join the force
oss to both sides. On the morning of the 9th, General Sheridan started on a raid against the enemy's lines of as below set forth. At evening of the 14th General Sheridan was reported by Lieutenant-Colonel Fuller, chirage. I telegraphed to Colonel Fuller to give General Sheridan all the forage and rations he needed. See Ao. 50. Later in the day I sent a despatch to General Sheridan requesting that he join me with his command, aterview at the earliest moment. On the 15th General Sheridan called on me at the front, and in conference w with me before that time, and deeming that if General Sheridan's command, numbering four thousand effective mturned out to graze. See Appendix No. 53. General Sheridan on the next day sent me a copy of his instructountry. This statement implies a censure on General Sheridan. It seemed to me, when I wrote it, to be justen publications in which it appears that after General Sheridan called on me and received my orders,--which he
clock, while the movement of the 9th was going on, the enemy, advancing from Richmond upon our rear, attacked the covering force of the Tenth Corps under Colonel Voorhis of the Sixty-Seventh Ohio, and for a moment forced him back, although he gallantly held his position. General Terry, with the reserve of that corps, advanced from Port Walthall Junction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring of
ction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was granted. On the morning of the 10th I received advices by signal from General Kautz announcing his return with his entire command. He had failed to reach Hicksford, but had burned the Stony Creek bridge, the Nottoway Bridge, and Jarratt's Station, and captured about one hundred and thirty prisoners, with a loss to his
Q. A. Gillmore (search for this): chapter 16
housand men from South Carolina, under Major-General Gillmore, who will command them in person. Majchmond. I called on my generals, Smith and Gillmore, and explained this plan. I said to them thail after your two corps commanders, Smith and Gillmore, have so strenuously advised that it should nnd of General Smith, I issued an order to General Gillmore to cause one brigade of each division of See Appendix No. 30. Although my order to Gillmore was explicit, yet he claimed that his troops oad bridge over Swift Creek, supported by General Gillmore on the left toward Chester Station. Ity corps commanders, in the handwriting of General Gillmore, suggesting, as the result of a conferenc See Appendix No. 43. Generals Smith and Gillmore made separate replies to my letter. These re interfere with me. Smith's letter shows that Gillmore would do nothing in the world to aid Smith. m on the left, if not too hotly opposed. General Gillmore will order one division of his corps to r[15 more...]
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 16
lete victory, and that the enemy's only hope was in heavy reinforcements from Beauregard. See Appendix No. 37. To this news, which I fully credited, save as to the reinforcements, as I had Beauregard at Petersburg, I made reply, detailing the operations under my command, and stating that Beauregard, with a large portion of hiBeauregard, with a large portion of his force, was, by the cutting of the railroads by Kautz's cavalry, left south of Petersburg, while the portion of his forces under the command of Hill which reached tht General Grant would not be troubled with further reinforcements to Lee from Beauregard's army. See Appendix No. 38. If Lee's army was in full retreat toward Rivictory (not true), and the only hope of Lee was in heavy reinforcements from Beauregard (which I knew was futile), then it was plain that I should carry out my instrps there from marching to the aid of Lee, and I was to throw my force between Beauregard and Lee, and prevent a possible junction of their forces. General Grant's vi
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 16
ve a success and complete victory, and that the enemy's only hope was in heavy reinforcements from Beauregard. See Appendix No. 37. To this news, which I fully credited, save as to the reinforcements, as I had Beauregard at Petersburg, I made reply, detailing the operations under my command, and stating that Beauregard, with a large portion of his force, was, by the cutting of the railroads by Kautz's cavalry, left south of Petersburg, while the portion of his forces under the command of Hill which reached that city had been whipped by us that day, after a severe fight, so that General Grant would not be troubled with further reinforcements to Lee from Beauregard's army. See Appendix No. 38. If Lee's army was in full retreat toward Richmond, Grant pursuing with his army on Friday night (the 6th) (not true), if Hancock had passed Spottsylvania Court-House on Sunday morning, the 8th (not true), if Grant, on that day, was on the march to join me, but had not determined the route
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...