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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana. Search the whole document.

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May 19th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 11
d of that policy which leads through peaceful progress to universal intelligence, virtue, and freedom. The distinguishing characteristics of his political addresses are clearness and candor of statement, a chivalrous courtesy to opponents, and a broad, genuine humor. In referring to the address itself, it declared: No man ever before made such an impression in his first appeal to a New York audience. It is a matter of history that Lincoln was nominated for the presidency on May 19, 1860. From that day till November 6th the Tribune labored night and day to make his election sure. It entertained no doubt of the result. It as yet had no fear of secession, but on October 13th declared: The Union will in no case be shattered. It will not even be seriously shaken. It is a rock on which thousands may make shipwreck of their own hopes, fortunes, and even lives, but which will itself be unaffected by their criminal madness. Parties will rise and fall, factions may rav
April 6th, 1858 AD (search for this): chapter 11
od cook, and if you were only back in the second story front, there would indeed be reason to believe in a superintending Providence. It's stupid in you, too, to be there in Paris, when we could keep you so nicely at work on the Cyclopaedia, filling up the gaps as we advance with printing. But never mind — there will be a good time for us all somewhere. My love to Mrs. Cranch, and to you, my dear Huntington, the same steady old affection which never showed a sign of giving out. On April 6, 1858, in explanation of his delay in writing, he says: The fact is I am a pretty busy chap. We print about seventy-five pages a week of the Cyclopaedia, which I must prepare the copy for, and then do my part in the revision of the proofs. Then all the afternoon and evening serving the Tribune. However, we keep good spirits and good digestion, and for constitutional ride a horse for two hours daily. . .. The Household Poetry is not published yet, but there is hope for it within a few
put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constant reiteration in the columns of the Tribune. It is also certain that when disaster overtook the national army, Greeley made haste to declare, in a letter dated July 23d, filling an entire column of the Tribune, over his own signature: I wish to be distinctly understood as not seeking to be relieved from any responsibility for urging the advance of the Union army in Virginia, though the precise phrase, Forward to Richmond, was not mine, and I would have preferred not to reiterate it. Henceforth I bar all criticism in these columns on army movements. Now let the wolves howl on! I do not believe they can goad me into another personal letter. In r
September 30th (search for this): chapter 11
ess. His course and influence as managing editor of the Tribune had come to be well understood in Washington, and had made him many friends among the public men connected with the various branches of the government. His personality and character were differentiated with distinctness from those of Greeley and the other New York editors. He was generally recognized as a more virile and vigorous writer than his chief, and a more consistent and patriotic one than most of his rivals. On September 30th of the same year, after a page of personal gossip, he wrote to his friend: I have sent you a copy of The Household Book of Poetry, . . . which also promises a fair pecuniary success. Lord, how the omitted poets growl over it!. .. [Fordyce] Barker is getting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've be
April 11th (search for this): chapter 11
ividends; taxes of every kind were increasing, and hard times seemed to be so certain that he thought of letting his house. Happily the necessity for that measure of retrenchment passed away with the return of business activity, which characterized the vigorous prosecution of the war. The financial crisis had passed, but it was swiftly followed by a crisis in Dana's personal and professional career which resulted in severing his connection with the Tribune, as heretofore related. On April 11th he wrote again to Huntington. I quote in part as follows: To put my news butt-end first, let me say that I have left the Tribune, and have just written to your brother to send on the share of stock in his hands as security, in order that I may sell the same with my other shares, and pay him the thousand dollars for which it is pledged. The facts very briefly narrated are: On Thursday, March 27th, I was notified that Mr. Greeley had given the stockholders notice that I must leave
enned it can hardly be conceived. It is as certain as any unproven thing can be that it was Dana's brain which conceived it and Dana's hand that wrote it. About the middle of May, 1861, the Tribune began to discuss the feasibility of a movement on Richmond; by the first of June it had begun to cry, Onward, and by the end of that month its columns bristled with: The Nation's war-cry-Forward to Richmond! Forward to Richmond! The Rebel Congress must not be allowed to meet there on July 20th! By that date the place must be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Dana said, in later years, that it was written by a regular contributor, Fitz-Henry Warren, of Iowa. There is not the slightest doubt, however, that Dana was directly responsible for its publication, and for its constan
little harm to Dana or the book. It must be confessed, however, that a sharp review in one of the magazines had the merit of calling Dana's attention anew to the whole list of American poets, which resulted in the selection of Poe's Annabel Lee, The Bells, and The Raven, as well as many others from both native and foreign authors, for the next and subsequent editions of the work. The Household Book has been frequently imitated under one name or another. It was thoroughly revised by Dana in 1884, has gone through many editions, and still justly holds its place as the best volume of the kind published in the English language. It is to be observed, however, that the compiler's modesty was too great to permit him to include even one of his own poems within its ample limits. The success which crowned this work from the start soon led to another and far more ambitious undertaking. Dana's indefatigable industry and wide range of reading had stored his mind with an extraordinary varie
November 30th (search for this): chapter 11
on be really oppressive or unjust to the South --nay, if the South really believes it so-we insist that a decent self-respect should impel the North to say, We think you utterly mistaken, but you have a right to judge for yourselves; so go if you will. A few days later, in another article, these lines occurred: We have no desire to see a single star erased from our Federal flag; but if any insists on going out, we decidedly object to the use of force to keep it in. Again on November 30th: Let us be patient, neither speaking daggers, nor looking daggers, nor using them; stand to our principles, but not to our arms, and all will yet be well. On December 8th: We gain avow our deliberate conviction that whenever six or eight contiguous States shall have formally seceded from the Union, it will not be found practicable to coerce them into subjection. On December 12th it said: We mean to be loyal to the Union, but we will hire nobody, bribe nobody, p
September 17th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
t lay within the province of the managing editor to insert it, the responsibility for it rested on him, even if he did not write it. During the closing days of the year the Tribune brought forward the proposition that the war could be ended within ninety days if the President would issue his proclamation that Slave-holding by rebels is not recognized by the government of the United States. And this idea was reiterated at intervals till shortly after the battle of Antietam (September 17, 1862), when President Lincoln, in recognition of a growing demand from the people, issued, September 22d, his ever-memorable Emancipation Proclamation, which took effect January 1, 1863, and finally put an end forever to slavery in the United States. Who first formulated this demand it would be impossible to ascertain at this late day, though it is known that it was not favorably considered by Lincoln till he became convinced that he could properly issue it as a war measure. It is worthy
March 27th (search for this): chapter 11
which resulted in severing his connection with the Tribune, as heretofore related. On April 11th he wrote again to Huntington. I quote in part as follows: To put my news butt-end first, let me say that I have left the Tribune, and have just written to your brother to send on the share of stock in his hands as security, in order that I may sell the same with my other shares, and pay him the thousand dollars for which it is pledged. The facts very briefly narrated are: On Thursday, March 27th, I was notified that Mr. Greeley had given the stockholders notice that I must leave, or he would, and that they wanted me to leave accordingly. No cause of dissatisfaction being alleged, and H. G. having been of late more confidential and friendly than ever, not once having said anything betokening disaffection to me, I sent a friend to him to ascertain if it was true, or if some misunderstanding was at the bottom of it. My friend came and reported it was true, and that H. G. was im
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