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ored as it was; that the hearts of the slave masters might be softened, so that his brethren might bear the yoke more easily, and that eventually the black race should be forever free. For the welfare of his sister and other relatives he also offered up a feeling prayer, and concluded by praying for the President and all those in authority under him. Condition of affairs in the West. [From the New York World, July 1.] The military situation at the West is not what it should be. Gen. Curtis is retreating, with a prospect that he will lose his army and leave Missouri undefended. Gen. Mitchell is retiring before the Confederates in Tennessee, and Gen. Morgan is marching in the opposite direction from Knoxville. Confederate armies are turning up in every direction, and our forces are nowhere as strong as they should be. The Confederate conscription act, which went into operation in February last, has produced its fruit in filling the Confederate rank and file with men of a mo
January, 7 AD (search for this): article 3
lion would be speedily crushed. He prayed also that the Union might be restored as it was; that the hearts of the slave masters might be softened, so that his brethren might bear the yoke more easily, and that eventually the black race should be forever free. For the welfare of his sister and other relatives he also offered up a feeling prayer, and concluded by praying for the President and all those in authority under him. Condition of affairs in the West. [From the New York World, July 1.] The military situation at the West is not what it should be. Gen. Curtis is retreating, with a prospect that he will lose his army and leave Missouri undefended. Gen. Mitchell is retiring before the Confederates in Tennessee, and Gen. Morgan is marching in the opposite direction from Knoxville. Confederate armies are turning up in every direction, and our forces are nowhere as strong as they should be. The Confederate conscription act, which went into operation in February last, has
February, 7 AD (search for this): article 3
Late Northern news. We continue extract from late Northern papers received at this office: From Washington.soldiers to be buried by contract. Washington, July 2. --The existing condition of affairs forces the Government to the anomaly of inviting proposals for burying deceased soldiers for the next six months. A contract for coffins has already been awarded, and the work of interment is so extensive that the department deem it proper to relieve the soldiers from that service and assign it to the civil service under contract. The rumors of war.[Cor. Of the N. Y. Express.] Sunday exceeded in magnitude and excitement anything which has transpired for some months past. The sympathetic sympathisers with secession were full of marvellous stories of battles, rumors, defeats, Stonewall Jack son's advance to Richmond, &c. The Department either had no news, or would give none out; and the former was probably true, as the wires were either out or not working well.
June 18th (search for this): article 3
me that recently under General Fremont, issued a farewell order to the troops in the highest degree complimentary to their fidelity, gallantry and discipline, and in conclusion expressing the earnest hope that victory may attend the cause of the Union, and glory crown the banner of the division. It is not true that General Blenker is dissatisfied with the new military arrangement in connection with the appointment of Gen. Pope. The repulse at Charleston. [From the New York World, June 18.] Treading close on the heels of Secretary Stanton's inglorious campaign in the Valley of the Shenandoah, we have now, for the further encouragement of the Confederates, an illustration of the value of the only strategy which he recognizes — that of marching straight upon the works of the enemy. This ill-timed movement cannot be charged on General Hunter; it was in violation of his express orders. General Hunter is a soldier; he knows that the success of troops depends on the skill wit
at Drainesville, as also did Lieut. Prime, who was killed with him. He lost all his pieces, but not until he had lost his life in trying to keep them from the enemy. Dr. Doolittle, of Duryea's Zouaves, who was wounded in the ankle, had six men of his regiment captured by the rebels. They were taken just this side of Gaines's Mill. A few moments earlier and the enemy would have captured two officers. A Puff from the gallows. A negro named Hawkins was hung in New York on the 27th ult. In his address to the crowd around the gallows he gave "Old Abe" a "first rate notice," saying he believed him to be the "best President since the days of Washington." The Herald says: Hawkins then stepped up to the Marshal and asked if he might be permitted to pray, and, on receiving an answer in the affirmative, he offered up the Lord's prayer with unusual clearness and fervor. He then prayed for the whole country, for the success of our arms, and expressed a hope that the rebelli
June 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 3
stitute, 41 of whom occupied the platform. As the clock told the hour of 81, the audience aforesaid manifested, in the usual manner, signs of impatience, whereupon Mr. Hart advanced to the desk, and apologized for the non-appearance of Mr. Wilson, on the ground of public duty; for the absence of Mr. Brownson, because he had not promised to come; and for the absence of Dr. Cheever, who is in "delicate health. " He then read the following letter from Senator Wilson: Senate Chamber, June 18, 1862. Dear Sir: I deeply regret that I cannot fulfill my engagement to speak on the 19th for your Association. When I made the engagement I thought we should be in a condition for me to fulfill it, but I find I cannot do so without neglect of duty here. It is very hard to keep a quorum present, and we have very important measures before us which I should not embarrass by my neglect of duty. After the adjournment I will fulfill this engagement if desired. Yours, truly, H. Wilson.
June 30th (search for this): article 3
erday, and caused his death. Both were drunk. Four men have been found dead here within the last twenty-four hours in consequence of drinking whiskey, large quantities of which were captured last night, and the trader in charge of it placed under arrest. Cheese, whiskey and onions for the troops. Dr. Vollum, Medical Inspector of the Army of the Potomac, has strongly recommended the Surgeon General to add cheese to the army ration, and to furnish a bountiful supply of onions as a preventive against scorbutic diseases. He has also recommended that the whiskey ration shall be resumed under the direction of the Medical Department. Arrest of a spy at Manassas. Manassas, June 30. --A Lieutenant Colonel in the rebel army, of the name of Nichols, who has not yet resigned his commission, and declares he will not, was to-day arrested in the garb of a pedlar, going from camp to camp, selling his wares. Col. Pierce held him as a spy, and he is to be dealt with as such.
hildish trifling in the midst of a known battle and the certain loss of life, was a most disgusting piece of levity, and met with the contempt it deserved. Federal officers killed. a correspondent of the Herald furnishes the following sketch of several of the Federal officers who were reported to have been killed: Colonel Samuel N. Black, of the Sixty-second Pennsylvania, was the son of the Rev. John Black, an eminent Scotch divine and professor; was admitted to the bar in 1833, and practised the law with brilliant success till the Mexican war broke out, when he went out as a private in the First Pennsylvania regiment, and afterwards became its Lieutenant-Colonel. He served with distinction in the war, and afterwards returned to the practice of his profession. In 1857 he was appointed by President Buchanan one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Nebraska, and was subsequently appointed Governor. A change of the administration caused his removal, after which he
June 29th (search for this): article 3
ight in company with negroes. Even the New England regiments don't like their company. The probability now is, that from the indispensable force of circumstances, Gen. Hunter will be obliged to leave a great many plantations, where the missionaries, under the protection of his guns, have been raising cotton, &c., and that the negroes, therefore, will be abandoned by Gen. Hunter, as were the white Union men of Jacksonville, Florida, by him. The Successor of Gen. Fremont. Washington, June 29. --Brigadier-General King on Saturday, in taking leave of his command at Fredericksburg to assume that recently under General Fremont, issued a farewell order to the troops in the highest degree complimentary to their fidelity, gallantry and discipline, and in conclusion expressing the earnest hope that victory may attend the cause of the Union, and glory crown the banner of the division. It is not true that General Blenker is dissatisfied with the new military arrangement in conn
York World, July 1.] The military situation at the West is not what it should be. Gen. Curtis is retreating, with a prospect that he will lose his army and leave Missouri undefended. Gen. Mitchell is retiring before the Confederates in Tennessee, and Gen. Morgan is marching in the opposite direction from Knoxville. Confederate armies are turning up in every direction, and our forces are nowhere as strong as they should be. The Confederate conscription act, which went into operation in February last, has produced its fruit in filling the Confederate rank and file with men of a more determined stamp than the volunteers. It is noticeable that the Confederates who fought at Shiloh and Fair Oaks are not the same troops who behaved so ignobly at Roanoke, Newbern, and Donelson. Notwithstanding the draft, however, and the unpromising state of affairs in the West, if the Confederates are beaten at Richmond we will have men enough and to spare to finish the rebellion. Gen. Hunter's
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