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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,873 1,873 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 79 79 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 66 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 50 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 36 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 26 26 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 23 23 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for 5th or search for 5th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
t a force of 1,800 cavalry, by way of West Point, to form a junction with him wherever he might get a foothold, and a force of 3,000 cavalry, under General Kautz, from Suffolk, to operate against the roads south of Petersburg and Richmond. On the 5th he occupied, without opposition, both City Point and Bermuda Hundred, his movement being a complete surprise. On the 6th he was in position with his main army and commenced intrenching. On the 7th he made a reconnaissance against the Petersburg on. The gun-boats becoming disabled were set on fire, as also were the transports, to prevent their falling into the hands of the enemy. About $1,500,000 worth of stores and property on the levee and in store-houses was consumed by fire. On the 5th the enemy disappeared and crossed to the north side of the Tennessee River, above Johnsonville, moving toward Clifton, and subsequently joined Hood. On the night of the 5th General Schofield, with the advance of the Twenty-third Corps, reached Jo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
growing region of Georgia and all its most valuable iron-works and foundries. I send you copies of my field orders See Part IV. which will give pretty good idea of the strategy on our part, and send you a file of Atlanta papers upl to the 5th instant. I cannot now undertake to describe our various conflicts, but will do so at a later period. Our losses and detachments are fully replaced by veteran regiments and detachments that have joined, and the two good old divisions of the Seventt against the railroad was therefore already reached and concluded, and as it was idle to pursue our enemy in that wooded country with a view to his capture, I gave orders on the 4th for the army to prepare to move back slowly to Atlanta. On the 5th we drew back to the vicinity of Jonesborough, five miles, where we remained a day. On the 7th we moved to Rough and Ready, seven miles, and the next day to the camps selected, viz, the Army of the Cumberland grouped around about Atlanta, the Army
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
ordered to intrench and remain in the position gained. The Twenty-third Corps came in sight behind our right flank during the engagement, but gave no support to our movement. The loss in Knefler's brigade was quite severe, including the dangerously wounding of Colonel Manderson, Nineteenth Ohio, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Ninth Kentucky, and the killing of Captain Miller, assistant adjutant-general of the brigade. We remained in our position confronting the enemy until the night of the 5th, when the troops were withdrawn, falling back to Jonesborough. Remained in bivouac at Jonesborough the 6th. On the 7th fell back to the vicinity of Rough and Ready, and on the 8th marched to our present camp east of Atlanta. In concluding this report I take pleasure in recommending to the favorable consideration of the commander of the department the division commanders of this corps, Generals Newton, Wood, and Kimball; quick and ready to comprehend, they were always zealous and care
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
command of this division on the day following that on which the order was issued, the division being then in position near the Howard house, about two miles northeasterly from Atlanta, on the left of the corps. Not having yet received the reports of the brigade commanders, I have not sufficient data from which to compile a history of the division during this campaign previous to that date, and shall, therefore, in this report speak only of its actions since I became its commander. On the 5th I was ordered by you to make a reconnaissance, which I did, demonstrating mean time with my whole picket-line, but did not succeed in developing any new facts in relation to the enemy's position. On the morning of the 6th the enemy appeared very active in my front and to my left, and during the forenoon made an attempt to press back the left of my picket-line, at the same time shelling my main line from his forts and batteries, within easy range, but this movement was repulsed without harm t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
e very spiritedly engaged, driving the enemy into his works. Night-fall compelled us to cease our efforts. During the night intrenched. The enemy withdrew during the night. September 2, pursued the enemy through Jonesborough, coming up to him again near Lovejoy's; went into position and drove his skirmishers back to his main line of works. Again night compelled cessation of work. September 3, was placed in reserve to Second and Third Brigades; occupied same position until evening of the 5th, when we withdrew and marched to present position on Augusta railroad, arriving September 8 p. m. In the early part of this arduous campaign this brigade lost by sickness the valuable services and directions of its proper commander, Brigadier-General Cruft. For its comparative success since then I am indebted to the intelligent and untiring efforts of the regimental commanders. I am truly under lasting obligations to these officers for their cheerful and prompt execution of all orders,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
4 p. m., as guard to supply train. That evening we marched eight miles and halted at ] 1 p. m. at the village of Etowah, on the bank of the Euharlee Creek. On the 5th we moved but slowly, on account of bad roads, and halted at Raccoon Creek. On the morning of the 6th we moved at 6 a. m., crossed the creek and began the ascent ofish line, which I did, and remained there until after dark, when I was relieved by a detachment from the Eighty-first Indiana, having I enlisted man killed. On the 5th, the enemy having left our front during the night, we moved along the railroad to Vining's Station, going into camp on the left of the road fronting the river. At s position until early day on the morning of the 3d, when we joined the brigade and remained until the 4th, when we moved to the rear about one-fourth mile. On the 5th at night-fall we moved to the rear and arrived at Jonesborough at 1 a. m. of the 6th, where we remained until the 7th, when we marched toward Atlanta, halting for t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
etieth Ohio, who were upon the skirmish line, the Second Division forming in our rear. The Thirty-eighth prolonged the line of the Ninetieth, and, an advance beeing ordered, went forward through a thick wood till it attained a hill in front of Jonesborough. The regiment made two charges upon the enemy's skirmish lines, driving them readily, with a loss of 3 men wounded. It remained till dark, when it was relieved by other troops. September 2, ra6ved to the left of the line near Lovejoy's; withdrew the night of the 5th, and, with the brigade, returned to Atlanta, reaching that place September 8. Recapitulation.-Commissioned officers wounded, 2; enlisted men wounded, 34; killed, 4; missing, 3; aggregate loss during the campaign, 43. The regiment was under the enemy's fire twenty-six consecutive days, from June 10 to July 5, both inclusive. W. T. Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Capt. John A. Wright, A. A. G., First Brig., First Div., Fourth Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
ng regiments of the brigade were promptly advanced to within supporting distance of the skirmish line, and a temporary barricade erected. On the morning of the 5th instant it was found that the enemy had again fallen back, and, pursuant to orders, the brigade marched with the division to Vining's Station, and went into camp along tion the skirmishers of the Ninety sixth Illinois charged gallantly and drove the enemy's skirmishers from their pits and occupied them. On the night of the 5th instant I was ordered to withdraw my brigade at 8 o'clock and move toward Jonesborough. The night was rainy, and, except when the lightning flashed, it was impossible to see ten steps in advance. Owing to the rains of the 3d, 4th, and 5th instant, the roads were in a horrible condition, and the men actually waded for miles through mud knee-deep. It was a terrible night march, and the men, overcome with fatigue, straggled considerably. Near daylight in the morning we reached the position held
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 34 (search)
skirmish line. By command of Brigadier-General Grose my regiment was relieved by the Ninth Indiana Veteran Volunteers immediately after dark and retired to the right of the rear line of breast-works occupied by the brigade, leaving my skirmishers where they were during the day, in which move 1 man was wounded. By order of the general commanding my regiment was moved farther to the rear on the morning of the 4th instant, for the purpose of resting, Where it laid until the evening of the 5th instant, when Colonel Bennett, commanding brigade, issued orders to move at 7 p. m. Marched all night, occupying at early daylight our line of works, established on the 1st instant, near Jonesborough, Ga., where my regiment staid during the day, furnishing a company for picket. My regiment moved with the brigade at sunrise to Rough and Ready Station, where it arrived about 2.30 p. m. September 7. Moved at 7 a. m. with the brigade in the direction of Atlanta, where it arrived at 12.30 p. m. S
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
e Seventy-fifth Illinois, of our brigade. As my regiment was much larger than the Seventyfifth, I was obliged to prolong the works in order to protect my men. As soon as the fog arose the enemy opened a concentrated fire of musketry with artillery upon my regiment, and kept it up until our works were completed. The casualties of the regiment at this place were 1 commissioned officer killed and 1 severely wounded, and 11 enlisted men wounded. We remained at this place until the night of the 5th, when we withdrew and marched to Jonesborough, where we remained until the 7th. On Wednesday, September 7, the regiment marched to Rough and Ready, and encamped for the night. On Thursday, September 8, marched through Atlanta and encamped two miles from the town in the direction of Decatur. From the 3d of May until June 7 the regiment was commanded by Capt. J. J. Lawson, Company C. On the 7th of June I returned to the regiment, and have been personally in command during all of the tim
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