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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 185 185 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 46 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 7th or search for 7th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 7: the Trent affair. (search)
1861. Sir:--We desire to communicate to you by this memorandum the facts attending our arrest yesterday on board the British mail steamer Trent, by your order. and our transfer to this ship. We, the undersigned, embarked at Havana on the 7th inst. as passengers on board the Trent, Captain Moir, bound to the Island of St. Thomas, in one of the regular passenger lines of the British Royal Mail Steamship Company, running from Vera Cruz, via Havana, to St. Thomas, and thence to Southampton, epresentative of the said company; Mr. Slidell being accompanied by his family, consisting of his wife, four children and a servant, and Mr. Eustis by his wife and servants. The Trent left Havana about 8 o'clock, a. m., on the morning of the 7th inst., and pursued her voyage uninterruptedly until intercepted by the United States steamer San Jacinto, under your command, on the following day (the 8th) in the manner now to be related: When the San Jacinto was first observed, several miles di
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
to dock! Mr. Fox states that the Powhatan, Captain Mercer, sailed on the 6th of April; the Pawnee, Commodore Rowan, on the 9th; the Pocahontas, Captain Gillis, on the 10th, the Harriet Lane, Captain Faunce, on the 8th, the tug Uncle Ben, on the 7th, the tug Yankee on the 8th, and the Baltic, Captain Fletcher, on the 8th; rather an unusual way for an expedition to start out, and calculated to cause a failure even if there were no other obstacles in the way. Three army officers accompanied theled for the relief of Fort Pickens, under the command of Lieut D. D. Porter. On the day (April 6th) when a telegram came for Mr. Welles to prepare the Powhatan for sea with all dispatch, that vessel was about to sail on another mission. On the 7th, came orders for Captain Mercer to take command of the expedition to Charleston. Supposing that the Powhatan had been taken in hand from her sheer-hulk condition on the 6th, and working on the best time, she could not have more than been ready
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
how many shots his gun had fired. He referred me to a memorandum on the whitewashed casemate; where with a rusty nail he had carefully and accurately marked every shot his gun had fired; and his account was corroborated by the gunner in the magazine. This may be considered as a striking example of coolness and bravery in a boy of fourteen, who had never before been under fire. Secretary Welles to Flag-officer Foote. Navy Department, February 13, 1862. Sir: Your letter of the 7th inst., communicating the details of your great success in the capture of Fort Henry, is just received. I had previously informed you of the reception of your telegraphic dispatch, announcing the event, which gave the highest satisfaction to the country. We have to-day the report of Lieutenant Commanding Phelps, with the gratifying results of his successful pursuit and capture and destruction of the Confederate steamers, and the disposition of the hostile camps as far up the Tennessee as Flor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
mmander Henry Walke, and the officers and men of the Carondelet, also to Acting First Master Hoel, of the Cincinnati, who volunteered for the occasion, its thanks for the gallant and successful services rendered in running the Carondelet past the rebel batteries on the night of the 4th inst. It was a daring and heroic act, well executed and deserving a special recognition. Commendation is also to be extended to the officers and crew of the Pittsburg, who in like manner on the night of the 7th inst. performed a similar service. These fearless acts dismayed the enemy, enabled the army under General Pope to cross the Mississippi, and eventuated in the surrender to yourself of Island 10, and finally, to the capture by General Pope, of the forts on the Tennessee shore, and the retreating rebels under General Mackall. I would also, in this connection, render the acknowledgements which are justly due the officers and crew of the several boats, who, in conjunction with a detachment of the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
ordnance batteries, extending three miles further down the river than during the siege in July, prevented my nearer approach to these boats. Having exchanged some shots, and ascertained that the upper fleet was not in the vicinity of the town, being short of provisions, my battery weakened by the loss of two guns burst, and also short of ammunition, I determined to steam down the river to New Orleans for supplies, and, if possible ascertain the strength of Port Hudson batteries. On the 7th instant, at 4.15, A. M., we were off that place, and, on coming within range, the enemy opened on us a vigorous fire with heavy siege guns. The Essex was struck with heavy shot fourteen times. As nearly as I can judge, the enemy had in position from thirty-five to forty guns of 10-inch, 9-inch, and 8-inch calibre, in three batteries commanding the river to the extent of five miles. A 68-pound, 32-pound, and also a 10-inch shot, lodged in the Essex, but without material damage. We were under fi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
well as the whites. At Milliken's Bend was also a portion of a white regiment which was looked upon by those who were not enthusiasts as by far the most reliable part of the garrison. On the 6th of June, the Admiral, who had general charge of matters in that quarter, hearing that some of the enemy's troops had been seen hovering around Milliken's Bend, sent the Choctaw, Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsay, up to that place with orders to be ready for an emergency At 2.15 A. M., on the 7th instant, an Army officer hailed the Choctaw and reported that his pickets had been attacked and driven in by the enemy. A few minutes later firing was heard in the main camp. The Choctaw immediately opened in direction of the enemy with a hundred-pounder rifle and a nine-inch shell-gun, the Federal troops, with the exception of the 23d Iowa, retreating at the first attack of the enemy. It was impossible for the Choctaw to fire except by signs from those on shore, who pointed out the directio
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ortion of the harbor, and stretched along from the mouth of Beaufort River to Scull Creek. It was high water on the 7th instant at 11h. 35m. A. M. by the tables of the Coast Survey. These circumstances — the superiority of Fort Walker and its though I know that the conduct of the officers and crew of the Wabash are warmly commended by you in the action of the 7th instant, yet, in obedience to your demand for a special report, I respectfully submit the following: The men did their dutyternoon, had a large white plank forward of the port wheel-house, probably where the shell went out. On the morning of the 7th, obeying signal, we took position assigned us in the line, and, passing up, delivered our fire at Bay Point, and on arrivie to the terror inspired by the bombardment of Forts Beauregard and Walker, and is a direct fruit of the victory of the 7th inst. By the fall of Tybee Island, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, which is within easy mortar distance, becomes only a que
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
ortion of the harbor, and stretched along from the mouth of Beaufort River to Scull Creek. It was high water on the 7th instant at 11h. 35m. A. M. by the tables of the Coast Survey. These circumstances — the superiority of Fort Walker and its though I know that the conduct of the officers and crew of the Wabash are warmly commended by you in the action of the 7th instant, yet, in obedience to your demand for a special report, I respectfully submit the following: The men did their dutyternoon, had a large white plank forward of the port wheel-house, probably where the shell went out. On the morning of the 7th, obeying signal, we took position assigned us in the line, and, passing up, delivered our fire at Bay Point, and on arrivie to the terror inspired by the bombardment of Forts Beauregard and Walker, and is a direct fruit of the victory of the 7th inst. By the fall of Tybee Island, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, which is within easy mortar distance, becomes only a que
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
iams, of the Louisiana, as volunteers, were almost continually engaged with the enemy's batteries opposite Washington, until the morning of the 4th, when the Ceres made a gallant dash past the forts, with a full supply of ammunition, and joined the besieged force above. On the 6th, a small naval battery of two light guns was established on shore, commanding the channel from above, to repel any attempt on the part of the enemy to attack the gun-boats from that quarter by water. On the 7th inst. 112, on the 8th 107, and on the 9th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. On the 12th, the gun-boats silenced and destroyed by their fire a battery which the enemy had erected with sand-bags and cotton-bales, abreast of the town, and which for seven days previously had maintained an active a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
n that and eighteen miles on the succeeding day, being much impeded by his large wagon train; and it seems General Lee was so far in advance that he could not rely on the whole of Franklin's force for support, as should have been the case. On the 7th, Lee's force had a severe skirmish with the enemy beyond Pleasant Hill, and, after some delay, a brigade of Franklin's infantry was sent to his assistance. Lee's cavalry were nothing more than infantry soldiers whom Banks had mounted, and as soon Notwithstanding the demonstrations of the enemy in front, Banks did not seem to think there was any likelihood of a pitched battle taking place. He gave an order, through Franklin, directing Lee to proceed as far as possible on the night of the 7th, with his whole train, in order to give the infantry room to advance on the 8th. The forces of General Lee only advanced one mile between the 7th and 8th of April, and on the latter date Lee reported by letter to General Franklin that the enemy w
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