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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 185 185 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 46 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 44 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 25 25 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 7th or search for 7th in all documents.

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n the armies of Gens. Jackson and Johnson, and that they were advancing to attack me at McDowell. Having, the day previous, sent out a large portion of the Third Virginia, Seventy-fifth Ohio, and Thirty-second Ohio regiments to Shaw's Ridge and upon the Shenandoah Mountain for the purpose of protecting my foraging and reconnoitring parties, I immediately ordered my whole force to concentrate at McDowell, and, expecting reinforcements, prepared for defence there. In the afternoon of the seventh inst., a large force of the rebels was discovered descending the west side of the Shenandoah Mountain, along the Staunton and Parkersburgh turnpike. I ordered a section of the Ninth Ohio battery, (Capt. Hyman,) on Shaw's Ridge, to shell them and endeavor to retard their progress. This they did with such effect as to cause the enemy to retire beyond the Shenandoah Mountain; but, observing another heavy force crossing the mountain on our right, some two miles distant, I deemed it prudent to fa
he James River, which replaced me in my original position. I then arranged with the General that he should notify me when his preparations for the evacuation of Norfolk were sufficiently advanced to enable me to act independently. On the seventh instant Corn. Hollins reached Norfolk, with orders from you to communicate with me and such officers as I might select in regard to the best disposition to be made of the Virginia, under the present aspect of things. We had arranged the conferen had assured me that they could take the ship, with a draft of eighteen feet, to within forty miles of Richmond. This the chief pilot, Mr. Parrish, and his chief assistant, Mr. Wright, had asserted again and again; and on the afternoon of the seventh, in my cabin, in the presence of Com. Hollins and Capt. Sterrett, in reply to a question of mine, they both emphatically declared their ability to do so. Confiding in these assurances, and, after consulting with the first and flag-lieutenants
Doc. 13.-the evacuation of Pensacola. Com. Porter's official report. U. S. Steamer Harriet Lane, Pensacola, May 10, 1862. sir: On the seventh instant I left Ship Island, with the steamers belonging to the mortar flotilla and the Sachem, for Mobile Bar, for the purpose of fixing on a place for the mortar vessels to lie, and to plant buoys for the ships to run in by when they should arrive. Great excitement seemed to exist within the forts on the appearance of our steamers. I have reason to think that Fort Gaines was evacuated, and some were of opinion that the troops were leaving Fort Morgan, but I think that they were reinforcing it from Fort Gaines. One of our steamers, the Clifton, got ashore under the guns of Fort Morgan, which opened fire on her, and when they had got her range beautifully, and were throwing the shot over, they stopped firing. Lieut. Commanding Bald-win went to work coolly, and got his vessel off just as I sent him assistance, and while I had t
ding. Report of Brig.-General Tyler. headquarters Third brigade, near Luray, Va., June 12, 1862. Gen. James Shields, Commanding Division: sir: In compliance with your order to proceed to Waynesboroa, 1 left Columbia Bridge on the seventh instant, reaching Naked Creek the same day, going into camp under orders to march at four o'clock A. M., next, that we might reach Port Republic at the time you indicated to me. When within about six miles of the town, I learned Acting Brig.-Gen. Caed from his command, having with him only his staff, fifteen cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. His infantry was five miles in his rear, and compelled to remain there, by the impassable creeks, between two and three days. On Saturday, the seventh, Col. Carroll received orders to move forward to Waynesboroa, distant some thirty-five or thirty-seven miles, by the way of Port Republic, for the purpose of destroying the railroad depot, track, bridge, etc., at that place, and to seize Jackson
ay, I secured much information regarding the movements of the rebel army, which was transmitted to the proper authority. On the sixth, the naval vessels arrived, conveying the division of Gen. Franklin. During the evening I received information that the enemy would attempt to destroy the town during the night, which I at once reported to the commanding officer, and received orders to anchor near the ship-yard, where I could command the approaches to the town. About eleven A. M., on the seventh, I heard that about four thousand of the troops recently stationed at Gloucester Point (who had retreated up the north side of the York River, with the view of crossing at this place, and were prevented by our presence) were crossing the Mattapony River at Frazier's Ferry, thirty miles above here. I immediately asked and obtained permission to go after them, and by three P. M. had carried the old flag thirty-six miles above West-Point, till our progress was checked by our draught of water.
den's Cove was much more complete than reported. He escaped without sword, hat, or horse. We silenced the enemy's batteries at Chattanooga on the evening of the seventh, after a fierce cannonading of three hours. We opened on the eighth at nine A. M., and continued six hours upon the town and rifle-pits, driving the enemy out andorces: sir: I have the honor to report that the forces under my command continued their march over the Cumberland mountains, arriving before Chattanooga on the seventh, after a long and tedious march. After a short rest, in accordance with your order, my command was thrown forward to reconnoitre in ford. We found the enemy oe the place on the morning of the seventh of June, having in the mean time (the sixth) rested on the top of the Cumberland mountain. At two o'clock P. M., on the seventh, Gen. Negley, with a military force, proceeded to reconnoitre. He soon ascertained that there was a large force of the enemy on this (north) side of the river, h
elled the rebels from their camp, and prevented the burning of the bridge, on which fagots had already been piled. By this time it was dark, and the forces rested. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. E. Hovey, Colonel Commanding. To Captain J. W. Paddock, Assistant Adjutant-General. Report of Lieut.-Colonel wood. headquarters First Indiana cavalry, Helena, Ark., July 15, 1862. Col. Conrad Baker, Commanding Fourth Brigade: sir: In obedience to your order, on the seventh inst., I proceeded with the Second battalion First regiment Indiana cavalry, and two steel rifled guns to the bridge across Bayou de View, which we fortunately succeeded in saving from destruction, the rebels having built a fire at the north end, ready to burn it. This we prevented by cautiously approaching their pickets, who fired upon us and fled. We returned their fire and shelled their camp, killing three. The rest, supposed to be five hundred, fled in the utmost confusion. In carryin
ut half-way between Generals Bayard and Buford, was established a signal-station, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court-House. On the seventh I proceeded to Sperryville, and inspected the corps of Major-Gen. Sigel. I remained at Sperryville until four o'clock in the afternoon of that day, during which report. headquarters Second brigade, Second division, Ninth army corps, Antietam, September 19, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that on Sunday, seventh instant, according to your orders, my brigade marched from Washington; that our march was resumed daily without noticeable incident, until Sunday, fourteenth instt Crumm's Mills. The road was strewn with arms, ammunition, camp equipage, wagons, etc., showing that the armies of the enemy were perfectly stampeded. On the seventh, again in pursuit before day-light, marching through Jonesborough, and, late at night, reached a point near Ripley. I have the honor to enclose, herewith, a li
he Orange and Alexandria road crosses Rapidan River, with his pickets extended as far to the east as Raccoon Ford, and connecting with Gen. Buford on his right at Burnett's Ford. From Raccoon Ford to the forks of the Rappahannock, above Falmouth, the Rapidan was lined with cavalry pickets. On the top of Thoroughfare Mountain, about half-way between Generals Bayard and Buford, was established a signal-station, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court-House. On the seventh I proceeded to Sperryville, and inspected the corps of Major-Gen. Sigel. I remained at Sperryville until four o'clock in the afternoon of that day, during which time I received several reports from the front that the enemy was crossing the Rappahannock at several points between the railroad-crossing of that river and Liberty Mills. I reached Culpeper Court-House on the morning of the eighth of August. The town had been occupied for several days by Crawford's brigade, of Gen. Banks's corp
. Bell, commanding Fifty-first Pennsylvania. All these gallant officers were killed in the action whilst heroically leading their men under a terrible fire of shell, canister and musketry. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. D. Cox, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Ninth Army Corps. (A true copy.) Brigadier-General Ferrero's report. headquarters Second brigade, Second division, Ninth army corps, Antietam, September 19, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that on Sunday, seventh instant, according to your orders, my brigade marched from Washington; that our march was resumed daily without noticeable incident, until Sunday, fourteenth instant, when we arrived at South-Mountain and engaged the enemy. At three o'clock we marched up the Hagerstown road, leading over the mountain, almost to its summit, and there formed line of battle to support other lines then engaged. At about half-past 3 o'clock I advanced, by your orders, to the top of the heights, in advance of
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