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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 61 61 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 11 11 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 8 8 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 6 6 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 3 3 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 47 BC or search for 47 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
ublic for lost. See the passages from Cicero's letters quoted in note to The Pardon of Marcellus, sect. 16 (p. 219, l. 4). On account of illness he was not present at the Battle of Pharsalia (Aug. 9, B.C. 48). After the fate of the contest was decided, he refused to continue the struggle or to follow the adherents of the lost cause to Africa, but returned to Italy (September, B.C. 48), to make terms with the conqueror. He remained at Brundisium until Caesar's return from Egypt in September, B.C. 47, when he at once sought an interview. Caesar received him with great kindness and respect, and allowed him once more to return to Rome. From this time until the assassination of Caesar in B.C. 44, Cicero remained for the most part in retirement at his Tusculan villa, absorbed in literary pursuits, though in B.C. 46 he delivered his Oration for Marcellus See pp.213 ff., below. (remarkable for its praise of Caesar), and his Defence of Ligarius, See pp. 225 ff., below. and, in the following y
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Roman Oratory. (search)
e his mind or feelings by the effective presentation of ideas. Hortensius, the great contemporary and rival of Cicero, was a special example of the Asiatic school. He was a somewhat effeminate person, with a dandified air both in composition and delivery. "His voice," we read, "was resonant and sweet, his motions and gestures had even more art than is suitable for an orator." Brutus, xcv, 326. The extreme Attic school was represented by C. Licinius Calvus. Born May 28, B.C. 82; died before B.C. 47. "Though he handled his style with knowledge and good taste," writes Cicero, "yet being too critical of himself" and fearing to acquire unhealthy force, he lost even real vitality. Accordingly, his speaking, repressed by too great scrupulousness, was brilliant to the learned and those who listened to him attentively, but by the crowd and the Forum it was swallowed like a pill." Brutus, lxxxii, 284. It is important to settle Cicero's own position in this contest. He himself fancied that he f
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 15 (search)
integra re, before anything had been done (i.e. before peace was broken). cum capitis mei periculo: it is said that after Pompey's defeat the command was urged upon Cicero by Cato; and on his refusal to conduct the war, Sextus Pompey would have stabbed him unless Cato had interfered. statim censuerit: Cicero was welcomed and kindly treated by Caesar on his return to Italy, B.C. 47. The war was not finished till the next year, hence incertus exitus, etc. victor, when victorious (opposed to incertus, etc.).
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 8 (search)
licuit, i.e. by the consuls (see last note). verbis notari: spurious, and to be disregarded in translation. It is no longer possible to refuse to declare Antony an enemy: this is implied in the honors proposed for the generals. sustulerunt, i.e. refused to put that question. imprudens, without knowing it. This and the following section give examples to prove Cicero's assertion that a supplicatio had never been decreed for victory in a civil war, that is, for victory over persons who were not hostes. bellum Octavianum: see Cat. 3, sect. 24 (p. 137, l. 26) and note. Servili: see note on p. 244, l. 9. conlega, i.e. Julius Caesar. de Alexandria: for a victory over the Egyptians; de Pharnace, son of Mithridates, King of Pontus (both victories, B.C. 47). ob conservationem: see Cat. 3, sect. 15. Gabinium: he had claimed a supplicatio, which the Senate steadily refused, for some successes against Arab marauders in Syria.