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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER IV. (search)
Liguria were annexed at first by a partial occupation, but subsequently divus C├Žsar and then Augustus subdued them completely in open war, so that nowAbout A. D. 17 or 18. the Romans direct their expeditions against the Germans from these countries as the most convenient rendezvous, and have already adorned their own country wther for a pattern in his government and ordinances. And in their turn his sons, Germanicus and Drusus,Germanicus was appointed to take charge of the East in A. D. 17, in 18 he took possession of his government, and died in 19. Drusus was in command of the armies of Germany in A. D. 17. Thus we may safely conclude this 6th booA. D. 17, in 18 he took possession of his government, and died in 19. Drusus was in command of the armies of Germany in A. D. 17. Thus we may safely conclude this 6th book of Strabo's Geography to have been written in A. D. 18. who are exercising the functions of government under their father, take him for their model.
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK XII., CHAPTER I. (search)
ude even Melitene in Cataonia, although Melitene lies between Cataonia and the Euphrates, approaches close to Commagene, and constitutes a tenth portion of Cappadocia, according to the division of the country into ten provinces. For the kings in our times who preceded ArchelausArcheaus received from Augustus (B. C. 20) some parts of Cilicia on the coast and the Lesser Armenia. In A. D. 15 Tiberius treacherously invited him to Rome, and kept him there. He died, probably about A. D. 17, and his kingdom was made a Roman province. usually divided the kingdom of Cappadocia in this manner. Cataonia is a tenth portion of Cappadocia. In our time each province had its own governor, and since no difference appears in the language of the Cataonians compared with that of the other Cappadocians, nor any difference in their customs, it is surprising how entirely the characteristic marks of a foreign nation have disappeared, yet they were distinct nations; Ariarathes, the first wh