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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 259 259 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 58 58 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 20 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for 1832 AD or search for 1832 AD in all documents.

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y persons willing to sell, and here our company bought off their houses to dwell in until we should see another place fit to remove into; but having been here some time, divers of our brethren did desire to sit still and not to remove farther, partly because of the fellowship of the churches, partly because they thought their lives were short and removals to near plantations full of troubles, partly because they found sufficient for themselves and their company, Life of Shepard, edition of 1832, pp. 42-58. Besides those who are here named by Mr. Shepard, another Mr. Cooke and William French came in the same ship (The Defence) with him; and the larger portion of those whose names first appear in 1635 and 1636 may safely be regarded as members of his company, to wit:— 1635. Jonas Austin. Removed to Hingham. Thomas Blodgett. Remained here. Thomas Blower. Remained here. William Blumfield. Removed to Hartford. Robert Bradish. Remained here. Thom
iends (Mr. Harlakenden dwelling with me, bearing all the charge of housekeeping), and far from the notice of my enemies, where we enjoyed sweet fellowship one with another and also with God, in a house which was fit to entertain any prince for fairness, greatness, and pleasantness. Here the Lord hid us all the winter long, and when it was fit to travel in the spring, we went up to London, Mr. Harlakenden not forsaking me all this while, for he was a father and mother to me, etc. (Boston Ed., 1832, pp. 54, 55). Mr. Shepard was accompanied to New England by this most precious servant of Jesus Christ, and bitterly lamented his early death; This loss was partially repaired by the accession of Herbert Pelham, Esq., in 1638 or 1639. He married the widow of Mr. Harlakenden, and was successively Treasurer of Harvard College, 1643, Assistant, 1645-49, and Commissioner of the United Colonies, 1645-46. He brought with him his daughter Penelope, who afterwards became the wife of Governor Josiah
iate of Mr. Makepeace in his subsequent transactions in real estate, in which it would seem that Mr. Davenport contributed the larger part of the cash capital, which was offset by the skill and judgment of Mr. Makepeace, who was the leading spirit in nearly all the schemes projected for public improvement. He also rendered faithful and useful services in various town offices, and as Representative in the General Court. After the ruin of his financial enterprises, he removed to Baltimore, in 1832, to superintend the Canton company improvements, so called, and died in a green old age, his eye not having lost its brilliancy, June 6, 1855.—See Makepeace Genealogy, by William Makepeace. which, after the opening of the great road, was the first framed building set up between Boston and Old Cambridge. The following year, a large house designed for a tavern The tavern stood on the lot next eastwardly from the store of Vose & Makepeace. It was destroyed by fire, Dec. 22, 1851. was built
e history and result of this petition appear on the records of the Commissioners, January Term, 1835: A petition of Jeduthun Wellington and others for a new highway across Cambridge Common was presented to the County Commissioners at the May Term, 1832, and an order of notice was issued. The case was heard at the September Term, 1832, when after argument and due deliberation, the Commissioners did adjudge and determine that they had no jurisdiction in the premises, and could not by law lay out 1832, when after argument and due deliberation, the Commissioners did adjudge and determine that they had no jurisdiction in the premises, and could not by law lay out and establish a public highway over and across said Common, as prayed for, etc. Whereupon the said petitioners applied to the Supreme Judicial Court of this Commonwealth for a mandamus upon said Commissioners, requiring them to exercise jurisdiction in the premises; and the said Supreme Judicial Court having refused to grant such writ of mandamus, it is now ordered, that said petition, which has been continued from term to term, to await the determination of the said Supreme Judicial Court, to t
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
, Abraham Biglow,William D. Peck. 1820, Abraham Biglow,J. F. Dana. 1821-1825, Abraham Biglow,Jonathan Hearsey. 1826-1828, Abraham Biglow,Samuel P. P. Fay. 1829-1832, Joseph Foster,Abraham Biglow. 1833-1835, Joseph Foster,Samuel P. P. Fay. 1836-1840, Samuel P. P. Fay,Isaac Lum. 1841, Charles C. Foster,James Greenleaf. 1842,. 1826,Rev. Ebenezer Blake. 1827, 1828Rev. Enoch Mudge. Died 2 April, 1850. 1829,Rev. Ephraim Wiley. 1830,Rev. Bartholomew Otheman. 1831,Rev. Ephraim Wiley. 1832,Rev. Leonard B. Griffing. 1833,Rev. George Pickering. Died 8 Dec., 1846. 1834,Rev. James C. Bontecou. 1835,Rev. Edward Otheman. 1836,Rev. Elijah H. Denning. fferent times, to establish the Episcopal Church in East Cambridge, but without success. In May, 1875, Rev. William Warland, a native-born son of Cambridge, H. C. 1832, finding several Episcopal families in that part of the city, offered his services as a missionary. The use of the Unitarian meeting-house, on the northwesterly c
feet westerly from Appian Way. This house was removed to Brighton Street, converted into a dwelling-house, and succeeded by a larger and more convenient edifice in 1832, in which the Grammar School was taught until, after a transitional state of a few years duration, it was merged into the High School. Besides the Grammar Schooth Avenue and Russell Street, erected in 1841 on the site of a former house, at the cost of $2,477, exclusive of land. 2. Washington, on Garden Street, erected in 1832 on the site of a former house, at the cost of $2,150.56, besides about $1,000 contributed by individuals. 3. Auburn, in School Court, erected in 1838, at the cost. 10. Otis, on Otis Street, erected in 1843, at the cost of $5,406.78, described as quite a magnificent structure. 11. Thorndike, on Thorndike Street, erected in 1832, and enlarged in 1840, at the total cost of $2,585.31. 12. Putnam, on the southwesterly corner of Otis and Fourth streets, erected in 1825 at the cost of $550 to
Benjamin Bigelow, 1830, 1835. James Hayward, 1830-1832, 1835. Jesse Hall, 1830. Abraham P. Sherman, 1Levi Parker, 1831, 1834, 1836. Josiah Mason, Jr., 1832. Samuel King, 1832, 1833. Amasa Davies, 1832-11832, 1833. Amasa Davies, 1832-1834. Sidney Willard, 1833, 1837, 1843. Charles Everett, 1833. Robert Fuller, 1834. Thomas B. Ganne1832-1834. Sidney Willard, 1833, 1837, 1843. Charles Everett, 1833. Robert Fuller, 1834. Thomas B. Gannett, 1834, 1835, 1837, 1838. Luther Brooks, 1835-1839. Eliab W. Metcalf, 1835. Jos. T. Buckingham, 1836, 1 Eliab W. Metcalf, 1829-1833. James Hayward, 1831, 1832. Ralph Smith, 1832-1835, 1837. Luther Brooks, 1832-1835, 1837. Luther Brooks, 1832-1835, 1837. Robert Fuller, 1832-1834. Wm. J. Whipple, 1833-1835. John Chamberlin, 1834, 1835. J1832-1835, 1837. Robert Fuller, 1832-1834. Wm. J. Whipple, 1833-1835. John Chamberlin, 1834, 1835. Joseph Burridge, 1835, 1836. William Parmenter, 1836. Charles C. Little, 1836-1841. Jesse Hall, 1836. 1832-1834. Wm. J. Whipple, 1833-1835. John Chamberlin, 1834, 1835. Joseph Burridge, 1835, 1836. William Parmenter, 1836. Charles C. Little, 1836-1841. Jesse Hall, 1836. William Hunnewell, 1836, 1837. Nathan Childs, 1837, 1838. Walter R. Mason, 1838, 1839. John L. Hobbs, 8-1830. Luther S. Cushing, 1831. John P. Tarbell, 1832-1834. Henry M. Chamberlain, 1835-1838. Lucius R. P
egard of the approaching winter. Autobiography, p. 45, ed. 1832. Gleason, Thomas, by w. Susanna, had Mary, b. here 31 Ocpoet, res. in Boston; .John, bap. 12 Ap. 1812, grad. H. C. 1832; Ll.B. 1839, res. in Camb. Dr. Holmes was eminent as a thewas Selectman from 1828 to 1831, four years, Representative 1832, and d. of consumption 18 Dec. 1840. His w. Hannah B. d. 1d. 18 July (or 25, gravestone,) 1795; his w. Mary d. 27 Ap. 1832, a. 82. 34. Jonas, s. of Jonas (23), m. Rachel Kent of Cec. 1849, a. 56; Philemon Robbins, b. 1794, m. Mary Wilkins 1832, res. several years in Camb., and d. in Somerville 6 June 1and d. 28 Nov. 1872; Theodore, b. 1 June 1812, grad. H. C. 1832, commenced preaching, but became insane, and d. at Brattleby C. Thompson, and had William, b. 2 May 1811, grad. H. C. 1832, an Episcopal clergyman, now having charge of the Church ofil. were William Williamson, b. 27 July 1814, grad. H. C. 1832, is a physician in Camb.; Francis Edward, bap. 5 Nov. 1820;
ut was driven back, and narrowly escaped destruction. Shepard says, The master of it, a very able seaman, was Mr. Gurling, who professed much love to me, who had got this ship, of 400 tons, from the Danes, and, as some report, it was by some fraud. But he denied it; and being a man very loving and full of fair promises of going at the time appointed, and an able seaman, hence we resolved to adventure that time, though dangerous in regard of the approaching winter. Autobiography, p. 45, ed. 1832. Gleason, Thomas, by w. Susanna, had Mary, b. here 31 Oct. 1657. He is said to have res. previously in Wat. and subsequently in Chs. and to have d. about 1684. 2. William, perhaps s. of Thomas (1), by w. Abiel, or Abiah, had William, b. 15 Ap. 1679; Esther, b. 13 and d. 27 Sept. 1688. William the f. d. here, and admn. was granted to w. Abiel, 6 Ap. 1691. He seems to have res. at the Farms. 3. William, prob. s. of William (2), by w. Thankful, had Experience, b. 18 Jan. 1707-8.
Mary was dau. of Ezra Stiles, D. D.; she d. 29 Aug. 1795, a. 28. He m. Sarah, dau. of Oliver Wendell, Esq., of Boston (pub 14 Feb. 1801), and had Mary Jackson, b. 17 June. 1802, m. Dr. Usher Parsons of Providence 23 Sept. 1822; Ann Susan, b. 15 May 1804, m. Rev. Charles W. William of Salem 29 May. 1826; Sarah Lathrop, bap. 29 Dec. 1805, d. 6 Nov. 1812; Oliver Wendell, b. 29 Aug. 1809, grad. H. C. 1829, a distinguished physician and poet, res. in Boston; .John, bap. 12 Ap. 1812, grad. H. C. 1832; Ll.B. 1839, res. in Camb. Dr. Holmes was eminent as a theologian and historian. His Annals are a monument of patient research and cautious and accurate investigation. His character is too fresh in the memory of the living to require a delineation. He d. 4 June 1837. His w. Sarah d. 19 Aug. 1862, a. 93. The mansionhouse, venerable for its age and the historical associations which cluster around it, still stands on the easterly side of Holmes Place. Homwood, William, by w. Winifred, h
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