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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 13 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
the Confederate officers. Mention is made in Commander Porter's letter of April 26th to Lieut.-Colonel Higgins of the Confederate vessels of war, for he says: And the vessels lying near the forts will be surrendered to the United States Government. Lieut. Colonel Higgins replied on April 27th that he could then entertain no proposition for a surrender; he did not allude to the Confederate war vessels. The next day he wrote as follows: headquarters, forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 28th, 1862.--Commodore David D. Porter, United States Navy, Commanding Mortar Fleet.--Sir: Upon mature deliberation, it has been decided to accept the terms of surrender of these forts, under the conditions offered by you in your letter of the 26th inst., viz., that the officers and men shall be paroled — officers retiring with their side-arms. We have no control over the vessels afloat. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Edward Higgins, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding. Admiral Porter s
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
were in charge of General McClernand. The whole force now slowly approaching Corinth, and cautiously casting up breastworks, numbered about one hundred and eight thousand men. Beauregard prepared to meet Halleck. He too had been re-enforced, and his army was re-organized. Price and Van Dorn had arrived with a large body of Missouri and Arkansas troops; and General Mansfield Lovell, who had fled from New Orleans when Butler's troops and the National gun-boats approached that city, April 28, 1862. had just arrived with his retreating force. In addition to these, the army had been largely increased by militia who had been sent forward from Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, the States immediately threatened with invasion. The organization of the corps of Hardee, Polk, Breckinridge, and Bragg, was continued. The whole number of Beauregard's troops was about sixty-five thousand. Most of them were the best drilled and best tried fighting men in the Confederacy. Bragg was Beaur
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
rd, at anchor off the city of New Orleans, April 28, 1862. Sir — Your communication of the 26th i mayoralty of New Orleans, City Hall, April 28, 1862. To the Common Council: Gentlemen — I h Mayoralty of New Orleans, City Hall, April 28, 1862. Sir-Your communication of this morningrd. At Anchor Off The City of New Orleans, April 28, 1862. Sir — Hereafter, when I desire to commloop Pensacola, at anchor off New Orleans, April 28, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report the fsmouth, off Pilot Town, Mississippi River, April 28, 1862. Sir-In compliance with your orders, I Jackson and St. Philip, Mississippi River, April 28, 1862. By articles of capitulation entered into this twenty-eighth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, between David D. PortMorse, Lieutenant and Post-Adjutant. April 28, 1862. The company of St. Mary's cannoniers e Steam Gun-Boat Owasco, Mississippi River, April 28, 1862. Sir — In obedience to your instruction[3 mor
April 11, 1862.-skirmish at Wartrace, Tenn. Report of Ma. Gen. S. Kirby Smith, G. S. Army. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., April 28, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that on the 10th instant a detachment of the Eighth Tennessee Cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Starnes, was sent out from Hillsborough, in this State, by order of Brigadier-General Maxey, for the purpose of scouring the country lying near the western slope of the Cumberland Mountains. This force, consisting of about 200 men, came upon a body of the enemy, 600 strong, at Wartrace, in Bedford County, and immediately attacked them in their camp. After a short engagement our men were withdrawn with a loss of 3 killed and 8 wounded. The killed are Lieutenant Wilson, Dr. Drake, and Private Austin Stanley. The names of the wounded are not given. Lieutenant-Colonel Starnes reports killing a considerable number of the enemy, but owing to the fact that they fought from
April 28, 1862.-skirmish near Monterey, Tenn. Reports of Maj. Gen. John Pope, U. 8. Army. eleven and A half miles Southwest of Grier's, April 28, 1862. [Sir:] Both roads are good; need short bridges and corduroys in places. Sent out five companies of cavalry this morning; met 150 of enemy's cavalry foraging; brisk April 28, 1862. [Sir:] Both roads are good; need short bridges and corduroys in places. Sent out five companies of cavalry this morning; met 150 of enemy's cavalry foraging; brisk skirmish and chase. Enemy lost 5 killed (1 major) and 19 prisoners. Our loss none. Small force, about 2,000, at Monterey, with one or two light batteries. My whole force up and in hand. I do not know exactly the position of Buell's force. My pickets connect through Elliott with Thomas. Am all ready to move forward. Have there is no considerable force of enemy on any road this side of Corinth. Jno. Pope, Major-General. Major-General Halleck. headquarters near Grier's, April 28, 1862. I occupied Monterey this morning at 9 o'clock; took tents, baggage, and supplies. Enemy fled during the night. Our advance went 1J miles beyond Monterey
April 28, 1862.-skirmish at Paint Rook Bridge, Ala. Reports, etc. No. 1.-Col. Joshua W. Sill, Thirty-third Ohio Infantry. No. 2.-Col. Alfred R. Chapin, Tenth Wisconsin Infantry. No. 3.-Sergt. William Nelson, Tenth Wisconsin Infantry. No. 4.-Congratulatory order of Maj. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel, U. S. Army. No. 1.-rsin Infantry. Paint Rook Bridge, May 8, 1862. Sir: It seems that you did not get my report of the affair with the enemy at this bridge on the night of April 28, 1862. I therefore send you an outline, knowing that you are cognizant of the general outline of the skirmish through hearsay. On the night of April 28, 1862, April 28, 1862, the enemy's cavalry, 250 strong, assisted by a number of citizens, made an attack on the guard at this bridge, for the purpose of driving them out and burning the structure. Their attack was continued for more than two hours, when they withdrew, having entirely failed in their attempts. Wm. Nelson, Sergeant Company I, Comma
s Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 28, 1862. I. Arrangement for defense of lines: quarters Army of the West, Memphis, Tenn., April 28, 1862. * * * * * * * II. All boats in Goverippi, commanded by Maj. Gen. W. J. Hardee, April 28, 1862. [Corinth, Miss.] Troops. Present for dummanded by Brig. Gen. William N. R. Beall, April 28, 1862. [Corinth, Miss.] Troops. Present for dus Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, April 28, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspectors Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, April 28, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspectors Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, April 28, 1862. Brig. Gen. D. Leadbetter, Commanding, &c.sippi, Maj. Gen. Braxton Bragg commanding, April 28, 1862. as announced in General orders, no. 23um for army and division commanders, dated April 28, 1862,* are directed, and will be properly commuum for army and division commanders, dated April 28, 1862, and as modified by a supplementary memora[2 more...]
water. I am not able to state the precise condition of those below, but I think they can be got ready for service in a few days after I reach the points where the work is in progress. I trust that I have given you all the information needed to enable you to respond to the inquiries of Commodore Foote's letter of instructions to you. Respectfully, yours, Chas. Ellet, Jr., Civil Engineer. General orders, no. 22. Hdqrs. Dept. of the Mississippi, Camp, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 28, 1862. I. As an appropriate tribute of respect to the memory of the late Maj. Gen. Charles F. Smith there will be fired at every military post and from every United States armed vessel in this department, on the day after the receipt of this order, thirteen minute guns, commencing at meridian, and the national flag will be displayed at half staff or mast from the same hour until sunset of the same day. The flag of his division will be draped in mourning and the officers of the division will
order may be preserved without resort to measures which I could not at this moment prevent. Your occupying the city does not transfer allegiance from the government of their choice to one which they have deliberately repudiated; and they yield the obedience which the conqueror is entitled to extort from the conquered. Respectfully, John T. Monroe, Mayor. to Capt. Farragut, which was tersely and fitly answered. U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford, at anchor off the city of New Orleans, April 28, 1862. To His Honor the Mayor and City Council of the City of New Orleans: Your communication of the 26th inst. has been received, together with that of the City Council. I deeply regret to see, both by their contents and the continued display of the flag of . Louisiana on the Court-House, a determination on the part of the city authorities not to haul it down. Moreover, when my officers and men were sent on shore to communicate with the authorities, arid to hoist the United States fla
ose herewith the capitulation of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, which surrendered to the mortar flotilla on the twenty-eighth of April, 1862. I also enclose in a box (forwarded on this occasion) all the flags taken in the two Forts, with the originalla. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary Navy. U. S. steamer Harriet Lane, Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Mississippi River, April 28, 1862. By articles of capitulation, entered into this twenty-eighth day of April, 1862, between David D. Porter, Commandtwenty-eighth day of April, 1862, between David D. Porter, Commander U. S. Navy, commanding the United States Mortar Flotilla, of the one part, and Brig.-Gen. J. K. Duncan, commanding the coast defences, and Lieut.-Col. Edward Higgins, commanding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, of the other part, it is mutually agreation of some value, I remain your obedient servant, Joseph S. Harris. memorandum of men paroled at Fort Jackson, April 28, 1862. Co. H, Jackson artillery, (C. S.A.,) four sergeants, two corporals, forty-two privates. Co. E, Jackson artille
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