Your search returned 185 results in 98 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
he Fourth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth A
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
No. 34. report of Col. Emerson Opdycke, one hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, commanding First brigade, of operations August 6-September 8. Hdqrs. First Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: I respectfully make the following report of the operations of this brigade from August 6, 1864, when, in obedience to division orders, I assumed command, to the capture of Atlanta: I found the brigade composed of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, Major Smith; Seventy-fourth Illinois, Captain Bryan; Seventy-third Illinois, Major Motherspaw; Forty-fourth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Russell; Thirty-sixth Illinois, Captain McNeal; Twenty-fourth Wisconsin, Major MacArthur; Fifteenth Missouri, Colonel Conrad, all aggregating an effective force of 1,143 officers and men. It was the extreme left of the infantry forces and but a few rods from the Howard house. The First Brigade of First Division was to my right and Colonel Minty's brigade of cavalry
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 162 (search)
ighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations June 1-September 8. Hdqrs. Eighty-Ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 18, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the movements of the Eighty-ninth Ohio from June I to August 6, 1864: June 1, the regiment formed part of the guard for the department ammunition train. June 2, moved about two miles on the road to Pumpkin Vine Creek ; bivouacked for the night. 3d, moved about two miles; crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek and bi. August 5, moved short distance to the left and front; threw up line of works on the front line, connecting the Ninety-second Ohio and right of General Hascall's division, Twenty-third Corps. The casualties in the regiment from May 7 to August 6, 1864, are-Killed, 2 enlisted men; wounded, 1 lieutenant and 12 enlisted men. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. H. Carlton, Colonel Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry. Capt. W. B. Curtis, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th A
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 164 (search)
hird Div., 14TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 16, 1864. Sir: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, in the campaign extending from May 7 to August 6, 1864. This brigade-composed of the Ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Col. G. Kammerling; Second Regiment Minnesota Veteran Volunteers, Col. James George; Eighty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Col. N. Gleason; Seventy-fifth Regiment IndianaHdqrs. Second Brig., Third Div., 14TH Army Corps, Atlanta, a., September--, 1864. Sir: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, since last report (to August 6, 1864), of which this is a continuation. My command — the One hundred and first Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan; Eighty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. E. P. Hammond; Seventy-fifth Regiment Indiana Voluntee
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 167 (search)
ition. Our loss in last three days, 2 enlisted men killed and 7 wounded. Loss: Commissioned officers-wounded, 2. Enlisted men-killed, 2; wounded, 28. Total casualties, 32. Very respectfully, Thos. Doan, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Capt. S. Fortner, A. A. A. G., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. headquarters 101ST Indiana, Near Atlanta, September 9, 1864. Captain: I have to report as to operations of this regiment since last report — that is to say, since August 6, 1864-as follows: August 7, were occupying an intrenched position three miles south of Atlanta; the enemy close on our front. Here we lost several men killed and wounded. August 13, took up a new position one mile to the right and fortified. Remained here until August 27, when we took up line of march in the direction of Jonesborough, Ga. During this march we intrenched ourselves in seven different positions. Near Jonesborough, Ga., September 1, we were a part of the column which sup
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 168 (search)
No. 161. reports of Lieut. Col. Judson W. Bishop, Second Minnesota Infantry. headquarters Second Minnesota Volunteers, Before Atlanta, Ga., August 26, 1864. Captain: I have the honor, in accordance with instructions from brigade headquarters, to submit the following summary of the part taken by the Second Regiment Minnesota Volunteers in the operations of the campaign during the three months ending the 6th day of August, 1864: On Saturday, the 7th day of May, the regiment broke camp at 4 a. m., marched at 9 a. m., and arriving at Tunnel Hill (seven miles), bivouacked at noon. Sunday, 8th, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to position on right flank of Fourteenth Army Corps. Monday, 9th, marched at 10 a. m. one-half mile to position on a ridge facing Buzzard Roost Gap, and one mile distant; marched again at 5 p. m. one-half mile in advance, and bivouacked in position. Tuesday, 10th, and Wednesday, 11th, remained in bivouac. Thursday, 12th, marched at 4 a. m. about fifteen m
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 169 (search)
No. 162. reports of Lieut. Col. George T. Perkins, one hundred and fifth Ohio Infantry. headquarters 105TH regiment Ohio Volunteers, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 15, 1864. Sir: In compliance with instructions contained in circular received this p. m., I have the honor to report the following as the history of the operations of this regiment during the present campaign up to August 6, 1864: The regiment broke camp at Ringgold, Ga., May 7, and marched to Tunnel Hill; thence it marched via Snake Creek Gap and took a position confronting the rebel position at Resaca; was under fire of the enemy's guns at that place May 14 and 15, but not engaged. After the evacuation of Resaca by the enemy the regiment joined in pursuit and marched to Kingston; thence it marched to Burnt Hickory, where, with the brigade and division, it lay for several days guarding trains. Ordered to the front from this place with the brigade, it took part in the various movements which compelled the enemy t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
President, O. O. Howard See page 61. was made the successor of McPherson in the command of the Army of the Tennessee. This preference was regarded by General Hooker as a disparagement of himself, and he resigned the command of the Twentieth Corps, which was assigned to General H. W. Slocum. The latter was then at Vicksburg, and the corps was ably handled by General A. S. Williams, until the arrival of his superior. General Palmer resigned the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, August 6, 1864. and was succeeded August 22. by that true soldier and most useful officer, General Jefferson C. Davis. The latter at once announced as his chief-of-staff, Colonel A. C. McClurg, an active young officer of the West, who had been the adjutant-general of the Fourteenth Corps since soon after the battle of Missionaries' Ridge, in which he was distinguished. General D. S. Stanley succeeded July 27. General Howard as commander of the Fourth Corps. H. W. Slooum. Sherman began his new
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
stant signal acts of bravery which would justly entitle them to medals of honor: George Taylor, Armorer; Lewis Copat, Landsman James Ward, Quarter-gunner; Daniel Whitfield, Quartermaster; John M. Burns, Seaman; John Edwards, Captain of Top; Adam McCullock, Seaman. On August 6th, the Admiral returned thanks in a general order to the officers and men who had so ably supported him during the late conflict, as follows: General order, no. 12. U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864. The Admiral returns thanks to the officers and crews of the vessels of the fleet for their gallant conduct during the fight of yesterday. It has never been his good fortune to see men do their duty with more courage and cheerfulness; for, although they knew that the enemy was prepared with all devilish means for our destruction, and though they witnessed the almost instantaneous annihilation of our gallant companions in the Tecumseh by a torpedo, and the slaughter of their friends
3 85 14th New York H. A. Ledlie's Ninth 10 44 78 132 2d Pennsylvania H. A. Ledlie's Ninth 9 35 72 116 4th Rhode Island Potter's Ninth 7 51 25 83 9th New Hampshire Potter's Ninth 9 35 30 74 4th New Hampshire Turner's Tenth 6 35 5 46 76th Pennsylvania Turner's Tenth 3 40 9 52 2d N. Y. M. Rifles Dismounted. Potter's Ninth 10 31 7 48 100th Pennsylvania Ledlie's Ninth 10 28 30 68 11th New Hampshire Potter's Ninth 9 32 22 63 Utoy Creek, Ga.             August 5-6, 1864.             100th Ohio Cox's Twenty-third 34 57 9 100 8th Tennessee Cox's Twenty-third 25 56 13 94 112th Illinois Cox's Twenty-third 12 58 1 71 38th Ohio Baird's Fourteenth 13 43 6 62 Deep Bottom, Va.             August 14-16, 1864.             11th Maine Terry's Tenth 20 121 6 147 24th Massachusetts Terry's Tenth 19 99 12 130 1st Maryland Cavalry Dismounted. Terry's Tenth 18 89 16 123 39th Illinois Terry's Tenth 20 76 7 103 3d New Hamps
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...