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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 78 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 4 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Bradford or search for Bradford in all documents.

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on by Hunter, six weeks before. That was held to be justified — and, at all events, was solely incited — by finding in a Lexington printing-office the type and proof of a handbill issued and signed by Letcher, calling on the people of that region to bushwhack Hunter's men — that is, fire at them from every covert, )while not embodied as a military force and seeming to be peaceful farmers or artisans. If this burning violated the laws of war, it had already been twice avenged by burning Gov. Bradford's country residence near Baltimore, and ex-P. M. General Blair's, near Washington. It was not in accordance with Lee's orders nor his practice in either of his invasions; for, though he burned Thaddeus Stevens's iron-works near Gettysburg (as we burned manufactories of warlike material, clothing, &c., throughout the South), he sternly forbad wanton devastation; and he was obeyed. Averill, with 2,600 cavalry, perplexed by the enemy's bewildering demonstrations, had fallen back from Ha<
re Blacks (6th U. S. heavy artillery); the other battalion was White, under Maj. Bradford, 13th Tennessee cavalry. Maj. Booth had six gulls. The attack was made bkilled. Hitherto, our men had defended an outer line of intrenchments; but Major Bradford now drew the garrison back into the fort, situated on the high, steep, but mmons, and soon after a second, demanding a surrender within 20 minutes; which Bradford declined. While these negotiations were in progress, the Rebels were stealis whence they could rush upon the fort whenever the signal should be given. Bradford's answer having been received, their rush was instantaneous, and in a moment tnival of murder continued till dark and was even renewed the next morning. Major Bradford was not murdered till they had taken him as a prisoner several miles on the may expect no quarter. N. B. Forrest, Maj.-Gen. Com'ding. Both Booth and Bradford having, been killed, the precise terms in which he summoned Fort Pillow do not
a, 472; a British runner forced to hoist the white flag, 473. blockade-running ended at Charleston, 482. Blunt, Gen. Jas. G., 36; joins Schofield. 36; routs Rebels at Maysville, Mo., 87; at Prairie Grove. 38 to 41; at Honey Springs, 449. Boomer, Col., severely wounded at Iuka, 224; killed at Vicksburg, 313. Booth, J. Wilkes, assassinates President Lincoln, 749. Bowen, Maj.-Gen., defends Port Gibson, 304: killed at Vicksburg, 315. Bowling Green, Ky., Rosecrans at, 270. Bradford, Major, his defense of Fort Pillow against Forrest, 619; murder of by Rebel soldiers, 619. Bragg, Gen. Braxton. joins Johnston at Corinth, 60; at Pittsburg Landing, 60; invades Kentucky, 213; his movements, 213; issues a proclamation to the people, 215-26-27; subsists his army without payment, and seizes horses and cattle without ceremony, 217; retreats before Buell's advance, 217-8; gives battle at Perryville, 219; his losses, 221; he escapes from Kentucky with his plunder — chagrin of