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ange with murderous effect. Captain Allison adds that he never saw such slaughter during the whole war as took place here. He further says that, when he got orders to fall back in the afternoon, his regiment was within two hundred yards of the enemy's batteries, in fine spirits and organization. He adds some striking incidents, of which want of space prevents the insertion. The Federal reports show that, among the troops who fought here, the Twenty-fifth Kentucky (Federal), Lieutenant-Colonel Bristow, lad but sixty-five men left, and Colonel McHenry reported that his regiment (the Seventeenth Kentucky) was reduced to one-half its numbers. Now was the time for the Confederates to push their advantage, and, closing in on the rear of Prentiss and Wallace, to finish the battle. But, on the contrary, there came a lull in the conflict on the right, lasting more than an hour from half-past 2, the time at which General Johnston fell. It is true that the Federals fell back and lef
ps had a perfect feast, and what could not be of use was immediately destroyed. Many hours had not elapsed since our arrival ere the station, locomotives, out-houses, store-houses, and superfluous stores were in a blaze, sending forth vast columns of smoke, which must have been discernible over an area of many miles. But this sort of thing could not be done with impunity. When couriers, hot and dusty, galloped up to Headquarters at the Junction, and reported firing in the direction of Bristow, it was evident that the truth had now become fully known to Pope, and that, having hurriedly broken up encampments around Warrenton, he was swooping down upon us with his whole force! This news was matter for serious consideration; and many said: Suppose they drop upon us on the other side from Alexandria? if so, we are gone chickens, and old Stonewall is played out! Jackson, however, had not been neglectful of chance combinations when revolving his plan, and knew upon what amount
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
nder that number. The loss in Ewell's division, beginning with the artillery fighting on the Rappahannock and ending, with the affair at Ox Hill, was in killed 366, wounded 1,169, and missing 32, the loss in my own brigade being 27 killed and 181 wounded. The main battle, which occurred on the 29th and 30th of August, has been called the second battle of Manassas, but I think the little village or hamlet of Groveton is entitled to the honor of giving its name to that great battle, as the fighting began there on the 28th, and was all around it on the 29th and 30th. The first battle near the same spot, on ground which was again fought over, had been properly named, as Manassas Junction was then the headquarters and central position of our army, and was the objective point of the enemy during the battle. Such was not the case with either army at the last battle, and the Junction, several miles off, had no more relation to the battle than Bristow, Gainesville or Centreville.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 27: on the Rapidan. (search)
d, and two of Hill's brigades which were in the advance moved against it while behind the railroad embankment, and were repulsed with some loss, a battery of artillery, which was advanced to the front at the same time, falling into the hands of the enemy. About this time my division, in the lead of Ewell's corps, came up on the right near Kettle Run Bridge, and was ordered to move forward against some troops and wagon trains said to be moving on the road across the run in the direction of Bristow. Gordon's brigade being in front was formed in line facing the run and he was directed to wait until the other brigades came up and were formed. While I was hurrying these brigades up, Gordon seeing some cavalry on the opposite hills made a rapid advance across the run and up the hills on the other side, driving the cavalry from the road to Bristow and pursuing it towards Brentsville. When the other brigades were brought up, I found Gordon unexpectedly gone, and I moved to the run, ex
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
186, 203 Bowman's Mill, 442 Boyd, Superintendent, J. F., 477 Bragg, General, Braxton, 157, 303 Branch, General, 128 Branch Mountain, 334, 336 Brandy Station, 106, 237, 307, 309, 310, 316 Braxton, Colonel, 371, 414, 417, 419, 422, 423, 425 Breckenridge, 360, 370, 371, 372, 374, 375, 376, 378, 381, 382. 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 392, 396, 399, 402, 414, 415, 420, 424, 425, 429, 453, 454, 461 Brentsville, 305 Bridgewater, 435 Brinly's Land, 246 Bristol, 466 Bristow, 54, 114, 115, 117, 133, 304, 305, 307 Broad Run, 116, 117, 118, 306 Brock Road, 352 Brockenborough, Colonel, 170, 173 Brock's Gap, 334, 339, 382 Brown, Captain, 97, 98, 127, 131, 176, 179, 199, 206, 241, 244 Brown, Captain, Wm. F., 97, 99, 108, 110 Brownsburg, 328 Brown's Gap, 371, 433, 434 Brucetown, 413 Buchanan, 327, 329, 330, 369, 375, 377, 380 Buckner's Neck, 160 Buffalo, 328 Buffalo Gap, 326, 327 Buford, Colonel, 278 Buford, General (U. S.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
g the former was Colonel James F. Mallon, of the Forty-second New York. General Posey, of Hill's corps, was mortally wounded. At Bristow Station the great race ended. Lee was beaten. Meade was strongly posted on the Heights of Centreville, and was too near the defenses of Washington See map on page 24, volume II. to allow his competitor to gain his rear; so Lee, after pushing a thin line to Bull's Run to mask his designs, effectually destroyed the Orange and Alexandria railway, from Bristow to the Rappahannock, and then began a retreat Oct. 18. with his whole army. Meade followed him the next day, but could not touch him, excepting with his cavalry. These were almost continually engaged in spirited but not serious skirmishing, excepting in an encounter Oct. 19. on Broad Run, near Buckland's Mills, between the divisions of Kilpatrick and Hampton, the latter under the personal directions of Stuart. Kilpatrick was defeated by a stratagem. Stuart allowed him to flank Hampton
s likewise ordered, at 9 P. M., August 27. to press forward, at the very earliest dawn, toward Manassas Junction, resting his right on the Manassas Gap Railroad, while Reno advanced simultaneously from Greenwich upon Manassas, and Kearny upon Bristow. Kearny reached Bristow at 8 A. M., August 28. with Reno on his left, and was immediately pushed forward, followed by Hooker, on the track of Ewell. McDowell gave orders for the required movement at 2 A. M.; but Sigel, who held his advance,Bristow at 8 A. M., August 28. with Reno on his left, and was immediately pushed forward, followed by Hooker, on the track of Ewell. McDowell gave orders for the required movement at 2 A. M.; but Sigel, who held his advance, had not fairly cleared Gainesville at 7 1/2 A. M. Meantime, Jackson, who was not easily caught napping, had commenced his evacuation of Manassas at 3 A. M., moving via Centerville; and thus escaping the destruction which probably awaited him had he persisted in seeking a more immediate junction with Longstreet's advance. Pope reached Manassas, with Kearny's division and Reno's corps, about noon; Jackson having left with his rear-guard an hour earlier. Pope immediately pushed forward all h
Meade, on reflection, was evidently ashamed — as well he might be — of this flight — which, the Rebels assert, continued up to Fairfax Court House — and would have attempted to retrace his steps directly; but a heavy rain Oct. 16. had rendered Bull Run unfordable, and obliged him to send for pontoons; meantime, the enemy, after skirmishing along his front and making feints of attack, retreated as rapidly as they had advanced, completely destroying the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Bristow to the Rappahannock — Stuart, aided by a flank attack from Fitz Hugh Lee, worsting Kilpatrick, by force of numbers, in a not very sanguinary encounter Oct. 19. near Buckland's Mills, whence our cavalry fell back nimbly to Gainesville. In this affair, Custer's brigade did most of the fighting on our side; but the enemy was so vastly the stronger, backed by infantry, that Kilpatrick did well to escape with little loss. Stuart claims to have taken 200 prisoners. Lee recrossed the Ra
is left well to the east. I directed Gen. Reno to march at the same hour from Greenwich, direct upon Manassas Junction, and Kearny to march at the same hour upon Bristow. This latter order was sent to Kearny to render my right at Bristow perfectly secure against the probable movement of Jackson in that direction. Kearny arrived Centreville at once. Destroy all the railroad property. Your troops at Bristow will withdraw through Brentsville. Your troops at Manassas and between there and Bristow will withdraw to Centreville. By command of Major-Gen. Pope. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. anaymarket, Thoroughfare Gap, in Bull Run Mountains, Gainesville, to Bristow station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad--making the difference from Amosville to Bristow (between forty-five and fifty miles) within the forty-eight hours. We burned up at Bristow two or three railway-trains, and moved up to Manassas Junction on Wedne
is left well to the east. I directed Gen. Reno to march at the same hour from Greenwich, direct upon Manassas Junction, and Kearny to march at the same hour upon Bristow. This latter order was sent to Kearny to render my right at Bristow perfectly secure against the probable movement of Jackson in that direction. Kearny arrived Centreville at once. Destroy all the railroad property. Your troops at Bristow will withdraw through Brentsville. Your troops at Manassas and between there and Bristow will withdraw to Centreville. By command of Major-Gen. Pope. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. anaymarket, Thoroughfare Gap, in Bull Run Mountains, Gainesville, to Bristow station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad--making the difference from Amosville to Bristow (between forty-five and fifty miles) within the forty-eight hours. We burned up at Bristow two or three railway-trains, and moved up to Manassas Junction on Wedne
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