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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
6497  Second DivisionNo report.62 (in hosp.) 62  Third Division89288122499  Fourth Division7253521628       Total   1,686 Eleventh Army Corps:      Bushbeck's Brigade3714581263       Aggregate Loss    1,949 No report from General Davis's division, but loss is small. Among the killed were some of our most valuable officers: Colonels Putnam, Ninety-third Illinois; O'Meara, Ninetieth Illinois; and Torrence, Thirtieth Iowa; Lieutenant-Colonel Taft, of the Eleventh Corps; and Major Bushnell, Thirteenth Illinois. Among the wounded are Brigadier-Generals Giles A. Smith, Corse, and Matthias; Colonel Raum; Colonel Waugelin, Twelfth Missouri; Lieutenant-Colonel Partridge, Thirteenth Illinois; Major P. I. Welsh, Fifty-sixth Illinois; and Major Nathan McAlla, Tenth Iowa. Among the missing is Lieutenant-Colonel Archer, Seventeenth Iowa. My report is already so long, that I must forbear mentioning acts of individual merit. These will be recorded in the r
of reach. The men threw up their caps with a wild shout, and rushed at the enemy, Col. Garfield, in his shirt-sleeves, leading the way. As the Federal troops reached the top of the hill, a rebel officer shouted in surprise: Why, how many of you are there? Twenty-five thousand men, d — n you! yelled a Kentucky Union officer, rushing at the rebel. In an instant the rebels broke and ran in utter confusion. Several instances of personal daring and coolness are related. A member of Capt. Bushnell's company in the Forty-second was about to bite a cartridge, when a musket-ball struck the cartridge from his fingers. Coolly facing the direction from which the shot came, he took out another cartridge and exclaimed: You can't do that again, old fellow. Capt. Willard says that the two men killed on our side were Kentuckians. The loss of the enemy is not known. In addition to the twenty-seven bodies found on the field, a number of human bones were found in several of the houses bur
he hill was cleared, and soon the reserve of the brigade came in at a double-quick. As soon as he saw them, Col. Garfield pulled off his coat, and flung it up in the air, where it lodged in a tree out of reach. The men threw up their caps with a wild shout, and rushed at the enemy, Col. Garfield, in his shirt-sleeves, leading the way. As the Federal troops reached the top of the hill, a rebel officer shouted in surprise: Why, how many of you are there? Twenty-five thousand men, d — n you, yelled a Kentucky Union officer, rushing at the rebel. In an instant the rebels broke and ran in utter confusion. Several instances of personal daring and coolness are related. A member of Capt. Bushnell's company in the Forty-second, was about to bite a cartridge when a musket — ball struck the cartridge from his fingers. Coolly facing the direction from which the shot came, he took out another cartridge and exclaimed: You can't do that again, old fellow. Cleveland Herald, January
loss was small. Among the killed were some of our most valuable officers — Colonels Putnam of the Ninety-third Illinois, O'Meara of the Ninetieth Illinois, Torrence of the Thirtieth Iowa, Lieutenant-Colonel Taft of the Eleventh corps, and Major Bushnell of the Thirteenth Illinois volunteers. Among the wounded are Generals Giles A. Smith, J. M. Corse, and Matthews; Colonel Baum; Colonel Wangeline, Twelfth Missouri volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Patridge, Thirteenth Illinois volunteers; Majith my apprehension, or the ends accomplished, nevertheless, there is cause for the deepest regret and sorrow. Among the fallen are some of the brightest names of the army. Creighton and Crane, of the Seventh Ohio; Acton, of the Fortieth Ohio; Bushnell, of the Thirteenth Illinois; Elliott, of the One Hundred and Second New-York, and others whose names my limits will not allow me to enumerate, will be remembered and lamented as long as courage and patriotism are esteemed as virtues among men.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Electrical torpedoes as a system of defence. (search)
of the I know it kind may exclaim, Why I don't see any invention in the matter, for it has been long known that if a chance was got at a ship with so much powder under her, she was bound to go up. But then if so simple, why did not Fulton or Bushnell, in the early history of our country, or the Russians during the Crimean war, stamp the fact upon the times, so as to render it, as it is now, a system of defence that no nation dares neglect. And how did it become so? I trust to history forpedo duty day and night, that fell upon me during the war, he would realize that as late as the summer of 1863, some of the ablest men of the day did not regard torpedo warfare as worthy of consideration, and the very attempts of Fulton and of Bushnell, and of the Russians, were used by those men in argument that my attempt would also be fruitless. Much of the light has to struggle through mediums of darkness and resistance, and gradually breaks in upon us. Our theories rarely assume a prac
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The blockade and the cruisers. (search)
remes possessed in their banks of oars—revived the trireme's mode of attack, and made the ram once more an effective weapon. But in 1861 this phase of naval development had not been recognized, and the sinking of the Cumberland, in March of the next year, first revealed the addition that steam had made to the number and variety of implements of destruction. Torpedoes, though of more recent introduction than rams, were not wholly new weapons. The idea of the torpedo, first discovered by Bushnell, and developed by Fulton, was rejected by the English Government in 1805, because it was recognized as giving an advantage to a weak navy over a powerful one, and its adoption could only impair the maritime supremacy of Great Britain. On account of this advantage which the torpedo gave to the weaker side, it was brought into use by the Russians in the Crimea, and, though none of the allied vessels were destroyed by its agency, it none the less contributed appreciably to the protection of R
ts officers were, Lieut.-Col. Francis A. Terry, Maj. Tom McKay; Company A, Capt. William F. Hoadley, of Little Rock, First Lieut. W. P. Parks, Second Lieut. W. C. Osborne, Third Lieut. John B. Baggett; Company B, Capt. T. F. Murff, of Pulaski county; Company C, Capt J. W. Hanson, of Clark county, First Lieut. J. A. Ross, Second Lieutenant Detwiler; Company D, Capt. Thomas Payne, of Prairie county, First Lieut. Tarver Toone; Company E, Capt. John Moore, First Lieutenant Blassingame, Second Lieutenant Bushnell. Captain Hoadley's company was given charge of a heavy gun battery at Columbus, and thenceforward was detached and employed in the heavy artillery. It was at Island No.10 during the terrific bombardment of that place, from which, after spiking their guns, upon the withdrawal of their infantry supports, Captain Hoadley and Lieutenant Baggett escaped to Memphis, but Lieutenant Osborne and his men were captured. Lieutenant Osborne died in prison at Alton, 111. The company was conso
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
1; 100, 1; 135-A; 137, G6 Burlington, W. Va. 82, 3; 84, 4; 100, 1; 135-C, 1; 136, E3, 136, F3 Fort Burnham, Va.: Plan, etc., of casemate 68, 8 Burnside's Expedition: North Carolina, 1862 40, 3 Burnsville, Ala. 76, 1; 148, E6 Burnsville, Miss. 23, 10; 24, 3; 78, 3; 117, 1; 118, 1; 149, D2 Burnt Chimneys, Va. 15, 2, 15, 4 Burnt Hickory, Ga. 48, 5; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 2; 59, 3; 88, 2; 117, 1 Burnt Ordinary, Va. 19, 3; 92, 1; 100, 1 Bushnell, Battery, Tenn.: Plan 111, 11 Butler, Mo. 119, 1; 161, F10 Butte La Rose, La. 156, C5 Buzzard Roost, Ga. 24, 3; 55, 6; 57, 2, 57, 3; 58, 2; 60, 1; 88, 2; 97, 1; 144, E3; 149, D11 Skirmishes, Feb. 24-25, 1864 33, 3 Buzzard Roost Gap, Ga. 57, 1 View 124, 5 Byhalia, Miss. 154, B11 Byram's Ford, Mo. 66, 3 Cabin Creek, Indian Territory 119, 1; 160, D8 Cabin Point, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 74, 1; 93, 1; 100, 1; 135-A; 137, G9 Cacapo
the enemy's line. We lost many brave spirits, none of whom deserve more honorable mention than Lieutenant Renfroe, who fell pierced through the head, with colors in his hand. Here, too, fell our brave, our true, our loved commander, Col. John Weedon. Having led with distinguished coolness and bravery his command to within 20 paces of the enemy's line, he fell to rise no more. He fell beneath the honored folds of that cherished flag, under which he had so gallantly led his brave men. Private Bushnell, bearing the colors, rushed fearlessly to the front and in advance of the line, where he was literally riddled with bullets. Where all did so well, both officers and men, it would be hard to discriminate, but I cannot fail to mention the coolness and gallantry of Adjt. W. G. Smith, and to express my appreciation of services rendered by him during the battle; nor can I close without the honorable mention of Lieutenant Michailoffsky, of Company B, whose conduct was so worthy the cause in
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Zzz Missing head (search)
uakerism, but in ourselves. We shall gain nothing by aping the customs and trying to adjust ourselves to the creeds of other sects. By so doing we make at the best a very awkward combination, and just as far as it is successful, it is at the expense of much that is vital in our old faith. If, for instance, I could bring myself to believe a hired ministry and a written creed essential to my moral and spiritual well-being, I think I should prefer to sit down at once under such teachers as Bushnell and Beecher, the like of whom in Biblical knowledge, ecclesiastical learning, and intellectual power, we are not likely to manufacture by half a century of theological manipulation in a Quaker school of the prophets. If I must go into the market and buy my preaching, I should naturally seek the best article on sale, without regard to the label attached to it. I am not insensible of the need of spiritual renovation in our Society. I feel and confess my own deficiencies as an individual
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