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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 23 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 26 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Carroll or search for Carroll in all documents.

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hers. He was entirely successful in deluding the wily foe, for, in the language of the F. F. V.'s, he fought right smart along the front of the Second corps. Colonel Carroll's brigade, composed of Western troops, conducted themselves in a manner that cannot be too highly praised. Colonel Carroll evinced considerable skill by drawColonel Carroll evinced considerable skill by drawing the enemy to his line of battle down she turnpike, where large numbers of Gordon's brigade, belonging to Early's division, were captured Colonel Carroll had a miraculous escape from instant death, his clothing having ten or twelve bullet-holes in it. Colonel Lockwood, of the same brigade, had his uniform pierced in several placColonel Carroll had a miraculous escape from instant death, his clothing having ten or twelve bullet-holes in it. Colonel Lockwood, of the same brigade, had his uniform pierced in several places by Minie balls. In the afternoon, General Meade ascertained that General French had participated in an engagement, and the enemy had massed a force strong enough to successfully resist him. The exact position of the Third corps, at this time, still continued an uncertainty, although it was known to be four or five miles dista
nor of his State promoted from Major to Lieutenant-Colonel--the position which he now holds in his old regiment. Those of his regiment instrumental in his dismissal, are now ready to testify to his merit as a gallant soldier. At twelve M., Colonel Carroll, commanding the First brigade of General Hayes's division, crossed to the support of the Third, and at five P. M., Colonel Powers, Second brigade, followed. The position occupied by Colonel Powers's brigade being an exposed one, his commay began to concentrate troops in my immediate front, and to advance a stronger line of skirmishers. I communicated this fact to corps headquarters, through the signal officer, and asked for reeinforcements. At ten minutes past three P. M., Colonels Carroll and Powers reported to me, by order of General Hayes, and I massed their brigades (First and Second, of the Third division) under cover from the enemy's fire, and in a position whence they could be readily deployed to the right or left, as c
nd drove the enemy into the woods and off the field. The day was won, but with severe loss in both officers and men. Captain Moss, of the First Louisiana cavalry, and Lieutenants Graham and Meader, of the Eighty-seventh Illinois mounted infantry, together with several privates, were wounded, and six or seven privates were killed. Colonel Lucas, with his First cavalry brigade, closely followed by Colonel Robinson, with his Third cavalry brigade, pursued the enemy several miles, as far as Carroll's saw-mill, where he found them drawn up on a wooded hill, with four guns in position. Heavy infantry and artillery firing continued until nightfall, when, in the dusk of the evening, a heavy rebel force charged on the Eighty-seventh, coming up to within ten feet of their line and firing rapidly. The gallant Eighty-seventh held their position, and, when the enemy were close upon them, delivered a volley and charged upon their assailants, driving them back in confusion. This ended the fig