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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.36 (search)
rnment the world ever saw, the stars and stripes, rebels, traitors, et id omne. Our entire corps was in order of battle all day, and General Breckinridge drove the enemy some distance from his front. The Twelfth Alabama went on picket at night. August 30th Very quiet. The Yanks made no advance. August 31st Another reconnoissance by Rodes' division. General Rodes received orders to drive the Yankees out of Martinsburg, and taking his division of Battle's Alabama, Cook's Georgia, Cox's North Carolina, and Lewis' (formerly Daniel's) North Carolina brigades, started on his errand. Battle's brigade was in front, and was shelled severely. General Rodes seems to think his old brigade of Alabamians entitled to the post of honor, and usually sends them to the front in times of danger. About two miles south of the town, the brigade was deployed, and ordered forward. We marched in this way through Cemetery Hill into town, running out the Yankee cavalry and artillery under Aver
giment, Colonel Cleburne. Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel D. C. Cross. Seventh Mississippi Regiment, Colonel J. J. Tornton. Third Brigade.-Colonel R. G. Shaver, commanding. Seventh Arkansas Regiment, Colonel Shaver. Eighth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel W. R. Patterson. Twenty-fourth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel R. D. Allison. Ninth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel J. J. Mason. Second division. Brigadier-General Buckner, commanding. Cavalry. Kentucky Regiment, Colonel B. H. Helm. Tennessee Regiment, Major Cox. Artillery. Lyon's and Porters batteries. Infantry. First Brigade.-Colonel Hanson, commanding. Hanson's, Thompson's, Trabue's, Hunt's, and Lewis's Kentucky Regiments. Second Brigade.-Colonel Baldwin, commanding. Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment, Colonel Baldwin. Twenty-sixth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Lillard. Third Brigade.-Colonel J. C. Brown, commanding. Third Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Brown. Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Martin. Eighteenth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel
an uproar. Many men, half asleep, rushed from their tents and fired off their guns in their company grounds. Others, supposing the enemy near, became excited and discharged theirs also. The tents were struck, Loomis' First Michigan Battery manned, and we awaited the attack, but none was made.. It was a false alarm. Some sentinel probably halted a stump and fired, thus rousing a thousand men from their warm beds. This is the first night alarm we have had. July, 22 We hear that General Cox has been beaten on the Kanawha; that our forces have been repulsed at Manassas Gap, and that our troops have been unsuccessful in Missouri. I trust the greater part, if not all, of this is untrue. We have been expecting orders to march, but they have not come. The men are very anxious to be moving, and when moving, strange to say, always very anxious to stop. July, 23 Officers and men are low-spirited to-night. The news of yesterday has been confirmed. Our army has been beat
d also eight or ten prisoners of war, from whom, as well as from citizens, I learned that the large force alluded to had crossed but an hour ahead of me towards Cumberland, and consisted of six regiments of Ohio troops, and two batteries under General Cox, and were en route, via Cumberland, for the Kanawha. I sent back this intelligence at once to the Commanding General. Striking directly across the National Road, I proceeded in the direction of Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, which point was reachine-shops and depot buildings of the railroad and several trains of loaded cars were entirely destroyed. From Chambersburg I decided, after mature consideration, to strike for the vicinity of Leesburg as the best route of return, particularly as Cox's command would have rendered the direction of Cumberland, full of mountain gorges, exceedingly hazardous. The route selected was through an open country. Of course I left nothing undone to prevent the inhabitants from detecting my real route an
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 8: the encampment. (search)
enteenth Corps under Blair, together with the Army of Georgia, commanded now by Slocum, composed of the Fourteenth Corps (part of Thomas' old Army of the Cumberland), now under Davis, and the Twentieth Corps under Mower,--this latter composed of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps of the Army of the Potomac sent to Sherman after Gettysburg, with Howard and Slocum. That part of Sherman's old army known as the Army of the Ohio, now commanded by Schofield, and made up of the Twenty-third Corps under Cox and the Tenth Corps under Terry,--of Fort Fisher fame,was not brought to this encampment. The fame of these men excited our curiosity and wish to know them better. Although not much interchange of visiting was allowed, we started out with very pleasant relations,--which unfortunately not being very deep-rooted soon withered. Still we admired them at a distance, and had it in our own hands to keep up that kind of a friendship. I am speaking now for our men of the rank and file, whose g
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
mand of General Reynolds, occupying the Cheat Mountain Pass. The other portion, commanded by General Cox, was designed for operations on the line of the Kanawha. General Rosecrans was one of the moased his force. The Confederate authorities in the meantime being informed of the advance of General Cox to the Kanawha, sent a force of about five thousand men to oppose him, under the command of Gn of affairs on the line of the Kanawha. General Floyd entered the Kanawha Valley in August. General Cox was then near Charleston. After some maneuvring, Floyd fell back to the junction of the New ral Wise. Floyd's force now numbered between eight and ten thousand men. Being uncertain whether Cox would advance up the New river line or upon that of the Gauley, he posted a force, under Wise, onnpike, near the Hawk's Nest. About the last of September General Rosecrans, having reinforced Cox, took command in person and advanced on the James River and Kanawha turnpike, gradually pushing b
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 16: battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam. (search)
dom of the occupant of the White House, and a want of patriotism by no means complimentary to the people of the North. McClellan had stated that the troops in and about Washington and on the Maryland shore of the Potomac above and below, including those in Maryland and Delaware, amounted, on the 1st of March, 1862, to 193,142 present for duty and an aggregate present and absent of 221,987. This did not include the 13,000 brought by Burnside from North Carolina, nor the troops brought by Cox from the Kanawha Valley, nor, is it presumed, the forces of Fremont under Sigel, a large part of which were probably brought from Missouri; and there had since been at least one call, if not more, for an additional levy of 300,000 men. Now the question very naturally arises, as to what had become of all that immense force, with the reinforcements and recruits, which had dwindled down to 87,164 men on the morning of the 17th of September, 1862. It will be seen from the account previously g
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 20: battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
hat of the enemy, and asking what place I proposed, for attacking the enemy. I think there was a note received later from General Lee communicating his wishes in regard to the proposed attack, similar to information brought by Major Costinat any rate the information of his views and wishes was brought by Lieutenant Pitzer on his return. It was about an hour before sunset when Major Costin reached me, and that part of my division on the right was more than three miles from the position at Cox's, so that it was impossible to accomplish anything that night. I immediately sent a note to General McLaws informing him that I would concentrate all my force that night and move against the enemy very early next morning, drive him from Lee's and Marye's Hills, and extend my left while advancing so as to connect with his (McLaws') right, and continue to move against the enemy above, after his connection with Fredericksburg was severed; and I asked General McLaws' co-operation in this plan.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
259, 261 Confederate Government, 2, 3, 10, 98, 160 Congressional Committee, 197, 207, 232, 256, 277, 297, 300 Conner's Brigade, 437, 449 Conrad's Store, 367, 369, 433 Conscript Act, 64 Conscript Bureau, 462 Cook, Lieutenant Colonel, 459 Cooke, General, 353, 356, 363 Cooley's House, 439, 441, 444 Corbet, Boston, 296, 297 Corse, Colonel, 48, 49 Cosby, General, 453, 454 Costin, Major, 220 Covington, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331 Cow Pasture River, 328, 330 Cox, General (U. S. A.), 158 Cox's House, 210, 220, 223 Coxe, Dr. (U. S. A.), 49 Craig's Creek, 328, 329 Crampton's Gap, 385, 386 Creigh, 380 Crittenden's House, 95, 96 Crook, General (U. S. A.), 370, 375, 379, 396, 398, 399, 406, 411, 417, 424, 425, 430, 443, 444, 461 Crooked Creek, 93 Cross Keys, 75 Crutchfield, Colonel, 176 Culpeper County, 285, 316, 317 Culpeper Court-House, 93, 94, 95, 96, 100, 101, 106, 165, 192, 237, 253, 277, 284, 302, 303, 316, 343, 407, 433
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
west Virginia on the 26th of May, he says, of his own volition and without orders. A portion of his command was under General Cox on the Kanawha. In McClellan's immediate front was a Confederate force under General Robert S. Garnett, who had been nton and Parkersburg turnpike crossed. The Confederate authorities-having been informed of the advance of the Federal General Cox in the Kanawha Valley and that there would probably be two armies operating in northwest Virginia, and also being disa would personally proceed daily long distances for that purpose. At this time Rosecrans was in the Kanawha Valley with Cox's column, and was opposed by the troops of the Confederate Generals Floyd and Wise, and was not with the force in General le and sagacious officer, was not slow to recognize the detached positions of these commands, and determined to re-enforce Cox and attempt the defeat of one or both of them. He advanced rapidly and assaulted Floyd's position, but was repulsed. Flo
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