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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 46 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 36 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 10 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dante or search for Dante in all documents.

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Dante and the Divine Comedy. An Italian friend finds fault with us for not classing the great Italian poet with Homer and Shakspeare, in our article upon the poubted before, however, our doubts were removed by thinking upon their compeer, Dante. Unlike his mighty brethren, he has left abundant traces of his personal histornd they do speak as though they were living in the world of their own day. Dante, on the contrary, tells his own story. His poem is a record of what he saw witthat was in print before his time. But where shall we look for the original of Dante? In the works of Virgil, for whom he professed a slavish admiration, altogetherer that poet? The descent of A├ćneas into the heathen Hades, and the sojourn of Dante in the invisible world, bear no more resemblance to each other than Helen bearsSt. Paul. The story of a vision which some enthusiast had before the advent of Dante has been republished; but in it we are unable to see any traces of the Divine C