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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 738 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 52 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 26 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for German or search for German in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
Fifth Avenue, first house from Washington Square. The Italian master was a son of the venerable Lorenzo da Ponte, who in his youth had written for Mozart the librettos of Don Giovanni and Le Nozze di Figaro. Four languages, English, French, German, and Italian, Julia learned thoroughly; she spoke and wrote them throughout her life correctly as well as fluently, with singularly pure accent and inflection, and seldom or never was at a loss for a word; nor was she less proficient in history. wledge of the science was limited to the fact that four quarts made a gallon: yet the higher mathematics had a mysterious attraction for her, as an unexplored region of wonder and romance. She was always a student. When she began the study of German, she set herself a task each day; lest anything should interfere to distract her mind, she had herself securely tied to her armchair, giving orders that she was on no account to be set free before the appointed hour. This was characteristic o
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
he was met by Mr. Evangelides, the Christy of her childhood, the Greek boy befriended by her father. He was now a prosperous man in middle life, full of affectionate remembrance of the family at 16 Bond Street, and of gratitude to dear Mr. Ward. He welcomed her most cordially, and introduced her not only to the beauties of Syra, but to its principal inhabitants, the governor of the Cyclades, the archbishop, and Doctor Hahn, the scientist and antiquary. She conversed with the archbishop in German. He deplored the absence of a state religion in America. I told him that the progress of religion in our country seemed to establish the fact that society attains the best religious culture through the greatest religious liberty. He replied that the members should all be united under one head. Yes, said I, but the Head is invisible ; and he repeated after me, Indeed, the Head is invisible. I will here remark that nothing could have been more refreshing to the New England mind than thi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, but it oughtappointing, may heal her deadly wounds and uplift her prostrate heart. She must learn that the doctrine of self is irreligious. The Commune surely knew this just as little as did Louis Napoleon. I want to keep eyesight enough to read Greek and German, and my teeth for clear speaking and good digestion. Paul says: Ye that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, but now we that are weak bear the infirmities of the strong. Peace meeting at the Club. Read in Greek first part
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: Santo Domingo 1872-1874; aet. 53-56 (search)
glance at its treasures. Yet a purchase of this kind seldom failed to bring its retributive pang the day after. Was sorry to have made so foolish a use of the money. Resolve never to do so again, unless some new light should make it seem right. God will not have my mind occupied with such nonsense.... Have written my sermon for to-morrow evening. They spent two months in Samana in almost absolute retirement. The Doctor read Don Quixote in Spanish, she Aristotle in Greek and Baur in German. The former was early and late in the saddle, and dashed up and down the steep hillsides of Samana with all his old fearlessness. The latter followed as she might, in perils and dangers, in terrors often. I had never been a bold rider, and I must confess that I suffered agonies of fear in following him on these expeditions. If I lagged behind, he would cry, Come on! it's as bad as going to a funeral to ride with you. And so, I suppose, it was. I remember one day when a great palm bra
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
war. Oscar von Rabe's room, in which I now write, contains only books of military drill. This day we visited the schoolhouse-session over, air of the room perfectly fetid. Schoolmaster, whom we did not see, a Pole — his sister could speak no German. Tattered primers in German. Visited the Jew, who keeps the only shop in Lesnian. Found a regular country assortment. He very civil. Gasthaus opposite, a shanty, with a beer-glass, coffee-cup and saucer rudely painted on its whitewashed boarGerman. Visited the Jew, who keeps the only shop in Lesnian. Found a regular country assortment. He very civil. Gasthaus opposite, a shanty, with a beer-glass, coffee-cup and saucer rudely painted on its whitewashed boards. Shoemaker in a damp hovel, with mahogany furniture, quite handsome. He made me a salaam with both hands raised to his head. We went to call upon Herr von Rohr, at Schenskowkhan — an extensive estate. I had put on my Cheney silk and my bonnet as a great parade. Our host showed us his house, his books and engravingshe has several etchings by Rembrandt. Herr von Mechlenberg, public librarian of Konigsberg, a learned little old man, trotted round with us. We had coffee and waffles. Me
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
Representative Women, and in many of the other congresses and conferences of that notable year. May 16. Chicago. Was appointed to preside today over a Report Convention [of the above Congress]; went to Room 6 of the Art Palace and found no one. Mrs. Kennard came presently, and Mrs. Clara B. Colby, who stood by me bravely — when about a dozen had gathered I opened the meeting. Mrs. Colby read reports for two associations, British, I think. A German delegate had a long report written in German, which it would have been useless for her to read. She accordingly reported as she was able, in very funny English, I helping her when she was at a loss for a word. Her evident earnestness made a good impression. I reported for A. A.W., partly in writing, partly extempore. In the evening read my paper on the Moral Initiative as regards Women. The hall [of Washington] was frightfully cold. May 17. Going to the Art Palace this afternoon I found an audience waiting in one of the small ha