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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 3 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
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lity — ended a heated discussion in the store one day over the new clerk's ability to meet the tactics of Clary's Grove, by a bet of ten dollars that Jack Armstrong was, in the language of the day, a better man than Lincoln. The new clerk strongly opposed this sort of an introduction, but after much. entreaty from Offut, at last consented to make his bow to the social lions of the town in this unusual way. He was now six feet four inches high, and weighed, as his friend and confidant, William Greene, tells us with impressive precision, two hundred and fourteen pounds. The contest was to be a friendly one and fairly conducted. All New Salem adjourned to the scene of the wrestle. Money, whiskey, knives, and all manner of property were staked on the result. It is unnecessary to go into the details of the encounter. Everyone knows how it ended; how at last the tall and angular rail-splitter, enraged at the suspicion of foul tactics, and profiting by his height and the length of his
the handbill. first political speech. the canvass. defeat. partnership in the store with Berry. the trade with William Greene. failure of the business. law studies. Pettifogging. stories and poetry. Referee in rural sports. deputy surveyIn Radford's case, fearing his bones might share the fate of his windows, he disposed of his stock and good — will to William Greene for a consideration of four hundred dollars. The latter employed Lincoln to make an inventory of the goods, and when completed, the new merchant, seeing in it something of a speculation, offered Greene an advance of two hundred and fifty dollars on his investment. The offer was accepted, and the stock and fixtures passed into the ownership and control of the now ve his note to James Herndon, Lincoln his to Rowan Herndon, while Lincoln & Berry as a firm, executed their obligation to Greene, Radford, and Rutledge in succession. Surely Wall Street at no time in its history has furnished a brace of speculators
f great mental depression, and wandered up and down the river and into the woods woefully abstracted — at times in the deepest distress. If, when we read what the many credible persons who knew him at the time tell us, we do not conclude that he was deranged, we must admit that he walked on that sharp and narrow line which divides sanity from insanity. To one friend he complained that the thought that the snows and rains fall upon her grave filled him with indescribable grief. Letter, Wm. Greene, Ms., May 29, 1865. He was watched with especial vigilance during damp, stormy days, under the belief that dark and gloomy weather might produce such a depression of spirits as to induce him to take his own life. His condition finally became so alarming, his friends consulted together and sent him to the house of a kind friend, Bowlin Greene, who lived in a secluded spot hidden by the hills, a mile south of town. Here he remained for some weeks under the care and ever watchful eye of th
Butler makes honorable mention of the following officers: Captain M. H. Wigg, A. C. S., when the flag staff was shot away, promptly mounted a transom and placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon it. Captain G. A. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King, and First-Lieutenant D G. Calhoun, were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous positions. Lieutenant Williams, Ordnance Officer, is also favorably mentioned. To Captains William Greene and B. G. Pinckney, of my staff, and First-Lieutenant A. H. Lucas, my Aid-de-Camp, I am indebted for valuable assistance, and my thanks are also due to Lieutenant-Colonel O. M. Dantzler and Doctor G. W. Wescott, volunteer Aids for the occasion. I have the honor to transmit herewith a statement in tabular form, showing the expenditure of ammunition by Fort Moultrie and the batteries during the action. All of which is respectfully submitted. J. H. Trapier, Brigadier-General, co
headquarters Marmaduke's division, Jacksonport, Arkansas, July 25, 1863. To Major W. B. Blair, A. A. A. General, District of Arkansas: Major: I have the honor to report herewith the part taken by my command in the battle at Helena. I was ordered on the evening of the third of July to be in position, attack and take the fort on Reiter's Hill, at daylight on the morning of the fourth of July. My command, mounted, consisted of Shelby's brigade, about one thousand one hundred men, and Greene's brigade, six hundred and fifty men, total one thousand seven hundred and fifty men. At ten o'clock P. M., July third, I marched to get into position; when three miles from the fort I dismounted my whole force except one company, under Major Elliott. I then moved forward. When within two miles of the fort, I found the road and country thoroughly obstructed, the enemy having chopped down the trees and rendered almost impassable that approach to the fort and town. The country was exceed
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Rhode Island, (search)
ph JenckesMay 1727 William WantonMay 1732 John WantonMay 1734 Richard Ward July 15, 1740 William Greene May, 1743 Gideon WantonMay 1745 William GreeneMay 1746 Gideon WantonMay 1747 William GreWilliam GreeneMay 1746 Gideon WantonMay 1747 William GreeneMay 1748 Stephen HopkinsMay 1755 William GreeneMay 1757 Stephen Hopkins March 14, 1758 Samuel Ward May, 1762 Stephen HopkinsMay 1763 Samuel WardMay 1765 Stephen HopkinsMay 1767 Josias LyndoWilliam GreeneMay 1748 Stephen HopkinsMay 1755 William GreeneMay 1757 Stephen Hopkins March 14, 1758 Samuel Ward May, 1762 Stephen HopkinsMay 1763 Samuel WardMay 1765 Stephen HopkinsMay 1767 Josias LyndonMay 1768 Joseph WantonMay 1769 Nicholas Cooke Nov., 1775 William GreeneMay, 1778 John Collins May 1786 Arthur FennerMay 1790 James FennerMay 1807 William JonesMay 1811 Nehemiah R. KnightMay 1William GreeneMay 1757 Stephen Hopkins March 14, 1758 Samuel Ward May, 1762 Stephen HopkinsMay 1763 Samuel WardMay 1765 Stephen HopkinsMay 1767 Josias LyndonMay 1768 Joseph WantonMay 1769 Nicholas Cooke Nov., 1775 William GreeneMay, 1778 John Collins May 1786 Arthur FennerMay 1790 James FennerMay 1807 William JonesMay 1811 Nehemiah R. KnightMay 1817 William C. GibbsMay 1821 James FennerMay 1824 Lemuel H. ArnoldMay 1831 John Brown FrancisMay 1833 William SpragueMay 1838 Samuel Ward KingMay 1840 Governors under the State ConstitutionWilliam GreeneMay, 1778 John Collins May 1786 Arthur FennerMay 1790 James FennerMay 1807 William JonesMay 1811 Nehemiah R. KnightMay 1817 William C. GibbsMay 1821 James FennerMay 1824 Lemuel H. ArnoldMay 1831 John Brown FrancisMay 1833 William SpragueMay 1838 Samuel Ward KingMay 1840 Governors under the State Constitution. James Fenner 1843 Charles Jackson 1845 Byron Diman. 1846 Elisha Harris 1847 Henry B. Anthony 1849 Philip Allen 1851 William Warner Hoppin 1854 Elisha Dyer 1857 Thomas G. Turner 1859 Willia
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
Valuation in 1860, $328,461; in 1865, $354,122. The selectmen in 1861 were George F. Duren, Joel Boynton, Selar Simons; in 1862, George F. Duren, Joel Boynton, Isaac Blaisdell; in 1863, John Q. A. Greene, L. Wilkins, James M. Currier; in 1864, George F. Duren, John Jacobs, Seba D. Bartlett; in 1865, George Duren, Seba D. Bartlett, Joel Boynton. The town-clerk during all these years was George F. Duren. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Thomas Greene; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, William Greene. 1861. The first action taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in matters relating to the war, was on the 11th of May, when it voted to pay each volunteer nine dollars a month in addition to his Government pay, the number not to exceed ten, and the payment to continue for one year. Selar Simons, Benjamin F. Heald, and Artemas Parker were authorized to draw on the town-treasurer for such sums as may be requisite to carry the above vote into effect. 1862. July 21st, Voted, to
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet Beecher Stowe. (search)
ly Magazine, and a critic of no little reputation; Miss Catharine Beecher, and her sister Harriet; Prof. Hentz and his wife, Caroline Lee Hentz, a novelist of popularity, and a woman of distinguished grace; E. P. Cranch, whose exquisite humor flowed from either pen or pencil with equal facility; James H. Perkins, a man of extraordinary talents; Col. E. D. Mansfield; Prof. J. W. Ward; Charles W. Elliot, the New England historian; Daniel Drake, a medical professor and author of celebrity; William Greene; three Misses Blackwell, two of whom have gained distinction as physicians; Prof. C. E. Stowe, widely known, both in Europe and America, as a scholar an i author; and Professor, and subsequently Major-General 0. M. Mitchell, whom the nation remembers as one of its most accomplished scientific men, and mourns as one of its noblest martyrs in the cause of liberty. In this brilliant circle Mrs. Stowe's genius soon began to shine conspicuously. Some of her contributions to these reunions
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
unt of the last-named battle, which may be found in Washington's correspondence. During the terrible winter at Valley Forge, Lieutenant-Colonel Ward obtained a month's furlough, wooed and married his cousin, Phoebe Greene (daughter of Governor William Greene, of Rhode Island, and of the beautiful Catherine Ray, Granddaughter of Simon Ray, one of the original owners of the island. He was pressed in a cheese-press on account of his religious opinions. of Block Island), and returned to thnes of Warwick, Greenes of East Greenwich; all through Colonial and Revolutionary history we find their names. Sturdy, active, patriotic men: Generals, Colonels, and Governors of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, chief among them Governor William Greene, the War Governor, and General Nathanael Greene of glorious memory. Our liveliest association with the name of Greene is the memory of Mrs. Nancy Greene, first cousin of our grandfather Ward and daughter-in-law of the General who died
ece, I, 72, 73, 246, 248, 262, 263, 267, 272, 275, 278, 297, 308, 364; II, 225. Greek Revolution, I, 72, 118, 261. Greeley, Isabel, II, 101. Green, J. R., II, 9. Green, Mrs. J. R., II, 300. Green Peace, I, 111-13, 119, 121, 125, 128, 129, 146, 147, 150, 151, 154, 163, 194, 283, 339, 355, 356. Green Peace, new, II, 364, 381. Greene, Nancy, I, 9, 78. Greene, Nathanael, I, 9. Greene, Nathanael, II, 220. Greene, Phoebe, I, 6, 65. Greene, Gov., Wm., I, 6, 9. Greene, Wm., I, 170. Greene, Wm. B., I, 366. Greenhalge, Frederick, II, 191, 200. Gregory XVI, I, 95. Griggs, E. H., II, 297. Grisi, Giulia, I, 86, 87, 316; II, 250, 350. Griswold, Rufus, I, 17, 131. Groton, II, 62. Guild, Mrs., Charles, II, 295. Guild, Sam, I, 124. Guizot, F. P. G., I, 97, 272. Gulesian, N. H., II, 190, 216. Gurowski, Count, I, 246, 259. Gustine, Mrs., I, 386, 387. Hague, II, 10, 11, 172. Hague Conferences, II, 381. Hahn, Dr., I, 272.
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