hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 48 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 26 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Bret Harte or search for Bret Harte in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
and polish and more likely to charge his lines with a meaning too large for the lyric which aims above all else at lightness and brightness. Three other American poets of high ambition, Stedman, See Book III, Chap. X. Aldrich, Ibid. and Bret Harte, See Book III, Chaps. V. and VI. gave a more abundant share of their attention to the poetry which is blithe and buoyant; and in any selection of the best in this kind, it would be inexcusable to omit Stedman's Pan in wall Street, Aldrich's In an Atelier, or Bret Harte's Her letter. Nor would any competent editor exclude from such a collection Weir Mitchell's Decanter of Madeira, George Arnold's Jolly old pedagogue, or Charles Henry Webb's Dum Vivimus Vivamus. Nor would it be difficult largely to increase this list of examples chosen from the verse of men whose reputation has been won mainly in other fields. Three of our lighter lyrists demand a little more detailed consideration,—John Godfrey Saxe (1816-87), Eugene Field
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
's first campaign. Lincoln's call for new troops gave rise to the sentimental but immensely effective Three hundred thousand more by James Sloan Gibbons and to Bret Harte's The Reveille (sometimes called The Drum), which is said to have played a large part in holding California loyal. The advance of Lee to Antietam, his repulse t in defeat that no Union poem on Gettysburg quite equals Will Henry Thompson's later High tide (1888). Stedman, however, made a ringing ballad, Gettysburg, and Bret Harte preserved a real episode of the day in his John Burns of Gettysburg. Best of all, of course, was Lincoln's famous address at the battle-field on 19 November, 1tramping, camping soldier by John Savage. All these are primarily concerned with the military side of the conflict. Civil matters, too, found poetic voices: Bret Harte's The Copperhead and The Copperhead Convention, and Thomas Clarke's Sir Copp, stinging denunciations; F. W. Lander's Rhode Island to the South, full of propheti
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
the West than any other type of literature. Bret Harte, writing in 1899, mentioned as the leading sFreeman). These names, together with that of Bret Harte himself, indicate that excellence in dialec and Whittier in their abolition poems. But Bret Harte See Book III, Chap. VI. gave new force touth, and the West. The dialect employed by Bret Harte has often been criticized as belonging to no heard. See Henry Childs Merwin's Life of Bret Harte (1911), pp. 325-327. Some of Mr. Merwin's ciwhich he construction noted in Uncle Remus. Bret Harte's dialect has also been subjected to criticito be original. The society, moreover, that Bret Harte portrays was unique in its compositeness. Tadventure necessary to this emigration, says Bret Harte, produced a body of men as strongly distinctsurprising. Investigation has shown that of Bret Harte's three hundred dialect words and phrases a black illiterates, as it is in the pages of Bret Harte. Guess in the New England sense is also use
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
it is idle to speculate; what did happen was the sudden appearance of a short story that stampeded America and for two decades set the style in short fiction. Bret Harte's The luck of Roaring camp, whatever one may think of its merits, must be admitted to be the most influential short story ever written in America. Francis Brs short story career began almost by accident, the result of his enforced leisure in prison. His first story, Whistling Dick's Christmas Stocking, redolent of Bret Harte, was published in McClure's magazine in 1899. Following it irregularly, came a series of Western and South American tales, and then finally a most remarkable oent only on amusing and surprising his reader. Everywhere brilliancy, but too often is it joined to cheapness; art, yet art merging swiftly into caricature. Like Harte, he cannot be trusted. Both writers on the whole may be said to have lowered the standards of American literature, since both worked in the surface of life with t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
2 n. Harper's magazine, 168, 169, 303, 371, 373, 381 Harris, G. W., 153 Harris, J. C., 303, 347-350, 352 n., 353, 354-360, 365, 379, 388, 389, 408 Harrson, Benjamin, 93 n., 191 Harrson, J. A., 61 n., 65 n. Harrisse, H., 128 Harte, Bret, 242, 281, 284, 286, 360, 362, 363, 365, 377-381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 387, 388, 389, 391, 394 Harvard, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, 33, 34, 35, 36, 77, 109, 110, 111, 115, 117, 123, 124, 126, 132, 133, 149, 207, 209, 226, 227, 246, 255, 316, 320 HDoctor, The, 152 Life and Adventures, Songs, services and speeches of private Miles O'Reilly, 155 Life and Sayings of Mrs. Partington, 155 Life and Writings of George Washington, The, 117 Life in the Iron Mills, 372, 392 Life of Bret Harte, 362 n. Life of Gouverneur Morris, the, 117 Life of James Otis, 105 Life of Jesus the Christ, 217 Life of Kennedy, 58 n. Life of Lowell, 250 n., 251 n. Life of Patrick Henry, 105 Life of Thomas Jefferson, 110 Life of Washingt