Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Andrew Johnson or search for Andrew Johnson in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Amnesty proclamations. (search)
t peace, and order, and freedom may be established, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do proclaim and declay, 1865, and of the independence of America the 89th. Andrew Johnson. President Johnson in 1868. In this year PresidePresident Johnson in 1868. In this year President Johnson issue two such proclamations. The first dated July 4. pardoning all persons engaged in the Civil War except thosPresident Johnson issue two such proclamations. The first dated July 4. pardoning all persons engaged in the Civil War except those under presentment or indictment in any court of the United States having competent jurisdiction, was as follows: Wherution and laws: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do, virtue of the Connce of the United States of America the ninety-third. Andrew Johnson. The second, issued Dec. 25, proclaimed unconditioe general good: Now, therefore, be it known that T, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, by virtue of the powend eight hundred and sixty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-third. Andrew Johnson.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
, or Julius Caaesar, or Washington, or Napoleon, the United States must be there to call to mind that there were twelve Caesars, most of them the opprobrium of the human race, and to contrast with them the line of American Presidents. The duty of the hour is incomplete, our mourning is insincere, if, while we express unwavering trust in the great principles that underlie our government, we do not also give our support to the man to whom the people have intrusted its administration. Andrew Johnson is now, by the Constitution, the President of the United States. and he stands before the world as the most conspicuous representative of the industrial classes. Left an orphan at four years old, poverty and toil were his steps to honor. His youth was not passed in the halls of colleges: nevertheless he has received a thorough political education in statesmanship, in the school of the people, and by long experience of public life. A village functionary; member successively of each br
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boutwell, George Sewall, 1818- (search)
Boutwell, George Sewall, 1818- Statesman; born in Brookline, Mass., Jan. 28, 1818; the son of a farmer; studied law, but never practised it, turning his attention to polities. He was seven times chosen to a seat in the Massachusetts legislature, and became the leader of the Democratic party in his State. In 1850 he was chosen governor of Massachusetts, and was re-elected in 1852. In 1862 he was elected to Congress, and was twice re-elected. He was one of the managers of the impeachment of President Johnson, and was Secretary of the Treasury from 1869 to 1873, when he became a member of the United States Senate, his term ending in 1879. He published Educational topics and institutions; his most important work, The Constitution of the United States at the end of the first century; and several works on taxation and political economy.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conduct of the War, (search)
ote of 33 yeas to 3 nays, adopted a resolution providing for the appointing of a joint committee of three from the Senate and four from the House to inquire into the conduct of the war, the committee to have power to send for persons and papers, and to sit through that session of Congress. The House concurred in the resolution on the following day, and on the 17th and 19th the committee was appointed, consisting of Senators Benjamin F. Wade, of Ohio; Zachariah Chandler, of Michigan, and Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee; and Representatives Daniel W. Gooch, of Massachusetts; John Covode, of Pennsylvania; George W. Julian, of Indiana, and Moses F. Odell, of New York. On Dec. 20 the committee held its first session and chose Senator Wade as chairman. This committee became an important factor in the early movements of the National army and navy. During its existence there were frequently complaints from officers in the field that their freedom of action was seriously impeded by this comm
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conkling, Roscoe 1829-1888 (search)
g. to Congress in 1860, 1864, and 1866, and in January, 1867, was chosen United States Senator and held his seat till 1881. During his service in the Senate he was active in the promotion of the reconstruction measures and in opposition to President Johnson's policy; was influential in securing the passage of the Civil rights bill (q. v.) over President Johnson's veto; and was notably conspicuous in his support of President Grant. Senator Conkling was a member of the judiciary committee duringPresident Johnson's veto; and was notably conspicuous in his support of President Grant. Senator Conkling was a member of the judiciary committee during the entire course of his senatorial career. He was a strong advocate of a third term for President Grant in 1880, and after the election of James A. Garfield, when an influential federal appointment was made in New York City, Senator Conkling and his associate, Senator Platt, claiming that they should have been consulted concerning such an appointment in their State, resigned. At the ensuing session of the State legislature, the two ex-Senators failed to secure re-election, and Mr. Conkling
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Impeachment. (search)
d enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders among the Indians, March 2, 1876; resigned at the same time; acquitted for want of jurisdi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Andrew 1808- (search)
Johnson, Andrew 1808- Seventeenth President of the United States; born in Raleigh, N. C., Dec.es, by a vote of 126 to 47, Resolved, that Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, be impeacl the people of the United States, against Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, in mainte the evidence and reasons reported by said Andrew Johnson for said suspension and having refused to of the duties of said office, whereby said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, did then ustody and charge. Respectfully yours, Andrew Johnson. To Brevet Maj.-Gen. Lorenzo Thomas, Adjury for the Department of War; whereby said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, did then cies, approved July 31, 1861, whereby said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, did then ffices, passed March 2, 1867, whereby said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, did then me in office. Article VII: That said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, unmindful[30 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lincoln, Abraham 1809- (search)
e Union National Convention assembled at Baltimore June 7, wherein all the States and Territories were represented by delegates, excepting those in the Confederacy. Their platform of principles was equally strong in support of national honor, national freedom, the emancipation of the slaves and the perpetuation of their freedom, the Monroe Doctrine, etc. It was the regular Republican Convention. It endorsed the acts of the administration, and nominated Abraham Lincoln for President and Andrew Johnson for Vice-President. The Democratic National Convention met at Chicago, Aug. 29. Horatio Seymour of New York, was its chairman, and, in his opening address on taking the chair, he expressed sentiments of extreme hostility to the policy of the administration, and condemnatory of the war for the preservation of the Union. They adopted a platform of principles, composed of six resolutions. It declared the fidelity of the Democratic party to the Union; that the war was a failure, and that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Moore, Frank 1828- (search)
Moore, Frank 1828- Editor; born in Concord, N. H., Dec. 17, 1828; was assistant secretary of the United States legation in Paris in 1869-72, and later engaged in journalism in New York. He is the editor of Songs and ballads of the American Revolution; Cyclopaedia of American eloquence; Diary of the American Revolution; Materials for history; The rebellion record; Speeches of Andrew Johnson, with a biographical introduction; Life and speeches of John bright; Women of the War, 1861-66; Songs and ballads of the Southern people, 1861–;65, et
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Narraganset Indians, (search)
arched through deep snow, and at 4 P. M. on Dec. 16 they attacked the fort. There was but one entrance, which had to be reached in the face of a fire from a blockhouse. The Massachusetts men, who first attacked, were repulsed, and several of the captains were killed. There was a desperate hand-to-hand fight, and the Indians were finally driven out into the open country. The 600 wigwams were set on fire, and the winter store of corn was destroyed. About 700 of the Indians were killed, including several chiefs, and of a large number wounded about 300 died. Many old men, women, and children perished, some of them in the flames. In this encounter Connecticut alone lost eighty men. Captains Johnson, Davenport, and Gardiner, of Massachusetts, and Gallop, Seely, and Marshall, of Connecticut, were slain. The Narragansets were almost exterminated in that war. The remnant settled at Charlestown, R. I., and were prosperous for a while, but the tribe is now extinct. See King Philip's War.
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