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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
and agony. After this tragedy I refused to permit the boat to be used again; but Lieutenant Dixon, a brave and determined man, having returned to Charleston, applied to me for authority to use it against the Federal steam sloop-of-war Housatonic, a powerful new vessel, carrying eleven guns of the largest calibre, which lay at the time in the north channel opposite Beach Inlet, materially obstructing the passage of our blockade-runners in and out. At the suggestion of my chief-of-staff, General Jordan, I consented to its use for this purpose, not as a submarine machine, but in the same manner as the David. As the Housatonic was easily approached through interior channels from behind Sullivan's Island, and Lieutenant Dixon readily procured a volunteer crew, his little vessel was fitted with a Lee spar torpedo, and the expedition was undertaken. Lieutenant Dixon, acting with characteristic coolness and resolution, struck and sunk the Housatonic on the night of February 17th, 1864; but
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
ook after some blockaders which were supposed to have ventured inside the bar. At 5 P. M. I dined with General and Mrs. Ripley. The dinner was a very sumptuous one, for a blockade dinner, as General Ripley called it. The other guests were Gen. Jordan, Chief of the Staff to Beauregard; Gen. Davis, Mr. Nutt, and Col. Rhett, of Fort Sumter. Thelatter told me that if the ironclads had come any closer than they did, he should have dosed them with flat-headed bolts out of the smoothbore guns, wd the law is violated, this is caused by the violence of the people themselves, who take the law into their own hands. General Beauregard sent his love to Sir James Fergusson, who had visited him during the early part of the war; so also did General Jordan, Chief of the Staff. Before taking my departure from the hotel, I was mueh gratified by meeting McCarthy, who had just returned from Richmond. He had had the good fortune to cross the Mississippi a little later than me, and he had encou
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 9: negro Spirituals. (search)
ss over. We'll cross de mighty river, My army cross over; We'll cross de-river Jordan, My army cross over; We'll cross de danger water, My army cross over; We'll croes the first. This, too, was a capital boat-song. X. One more river. O, Jordan bank was a great old bank, Dere ain't but one more river to cross. We have some valiant soldier here, Dere ain't, &c. O, Jordan stream will never run dry, Dere ain't, &c. Dere's a hill on my leff, and he catch on my right, Dere ain't but one moither reel nor totter, totter, totter, And she's, &c. She's a-sailin‘ away cold Jordan, Jordan, Jordan, And she's, &c. King Jesus is de captain, captain, captain, AndJordan, Jordan, And she's, &c. King Jesus is de captain, captain, captain, And she's makin‘ for de Promise Land. XXX. the Ship of Zion. (Third version.) De Gospel ship is sailin‘, Hosann-sann. O, Jesus is de captain, Hosann — sann. DJordan, And she's, &c. King Jesus is de captain, captain, captain, And she's makin‘ for de Promise Land. XXX. the Ship of Zion. (Third version.) De Gospel ship is sailin‘, Hosann-sann. O, Jesus is de captain, Hosann — sann. De angels are de sailors, Hosann — sann. O, is your bundle ready? Hosann — sann. O, have you got your ticket? Hosann — sann. This abbreviated chor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Private Keech, Company I; and Bugler Drilling. Sergeant Betts, of Company C; Privates Young, Company B; Fowler, Company G, and Wilkins, of Company C, died as became brave men, in the front of the charge at the head of the column. In the Second, the commanding officer reports, where so many behaved themselves with so much gallantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, Company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, Company K, (specially commended for reckless daring without a parallel). As coming under my own observation, I particularly noticed Colonel T. L. Rosser, of the Fifth, with his habitual coolness and daring, charging at the head of his regiment. Colonel James Drake, of the First, always ready at the right time and place. Colonel T. H. Owen, of Third, begging to be allowed to charge, again and again. Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Payne, of the Fourth,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
and agony. After this tragedy I refused to permit the boat to be used again; but Lieutenant Dixon, a brave and determined man, having returned to Charleston, applied to me for authority to use it against the Federal steam sloop-of-war Housatonic, a powerful new vessel, carrying eleven guns of the largest calibre, which lay at the time in the north channel opposite Beach Inlet, materially obstructing the passage of our blockade-runners in and out. At the suggestion of my chief-of-staff, Gen. Jordan, I consented to its use for this purpose, not as a submarine machine, but in the same manner as the David. As the Housatonic was easily approached through interior channels from behind Sullivan's Island, and Lieutenant Dixon readily procured a volunteer crew, his little vessel was fitted with a Lee spar torpedo, and the expedition was undertaken. Lieutenant Dixon, acting with characteristic coolness and resolution, struck and sunk the Housatonic on the night of February 17, 1864; but un
They had been surprised and attacked on their flank and rear by the Fourth Kentucky, (Colonel Cooper,) Sixth Kentucky, (Colonel Watkins,) Ninth Pennsylvania, (Colonel Jordan,) and Second Michigan, (Colonel Campbell.) The hottest and heaviest work fell to the the lot of the Fourth Kentucky, whose gallant and intrepid leader, Colone Colonel Watkins commanding; Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Cooper commanding; Second Michigan cavalry, Major Godley commanding; Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, Colonel Jordan commanding. Nearing Franklin, we found the rebels had possession of part of the town, and had planted their artillery in the outskirts, had surrounded the were attacked by the enemy in force on the flank. They were instantly prepared to fight as dragoons on foot, and engaged the enemy, Colonel Campbell ordering Colonel Jordan with the Ninth Pennsylvania to support them in column on each flank with drawn sabre for a charge, which was promptly done. The fighting was very severe here
if by instinct, and in an instant the men were in line. We advanced rapidly to the first line of rifle-works; our skirmishers cleared it with a bound, ad advanced to the second line. Our main forces moved to the first line — the foe retired, firing. Lieutenant-Colonel Rodman now sent word back for the General to land his whole force, as we could hold the line we occupied. After exchanging a few shots, and the brigade being landed and ready to advance, the enemy began to give way. Lieutenant Jordan, with a detachment of company I, pushed right up into their batteries on our right, and not finding the first gun in working order — it having been disabled by a short — he pushed forward to what is now called Battery Rodman, in which there was an eight-inch sea-coast howitzer, and turned it on the retreating foe, bursting several shells over their heads before they reached Fort Wagner. Our forces captured eight single gun batteries and three mortars, and not far from two hundred pr<
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
sition, and the right column penetrated an equal distance eastward, without serious resistance. The center was not so fortunate. A little more than a mile in advance of the National works at Chancellorsville its cavalry met the vanguard of the Confederates, and a spirited contest ensued, in which the former vere driven back. Then Sykes brought up his entire column, with artillery, and after a severe struggle with McLaws, whose force was deployed in line of battle across the turnpike, with Jordan's battery on the Mine road, he pushed his foe back. At about noon, he gained the advantageous position of one of the ridges, back of Fredericksburg, which are nearly parallel with the Rappahannock, and which commanded Chancellorsville and the surrounding country. Banks's Ford, which Lee had strenuously endeavored to cover, was now virtually in possession of the Nationals, and the distance between Sedgwick, opposite Fredericksburg, and the main army at Chancellorsville, was thereby shortene
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
and General Sheridan at Murfreesboroa, were ordered to move in the direction of this menacing force. They marched simultaneously. March 4. Colburn's command consisted of nearly twenty-seven hundred men, of whom six hundred were cavalry. A part of the Thirty-third and Eighty-fifth Indiana, Twenty-second Wisconsin, Nineteenth Michigan, and One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio. The cavalry consisted of detachments from tho Second Michigan, Ninth Pennsylvania, and Fourth Kentucky, under Colonel Jordan. A battery of six guns composed the artillery. He was directed to move on Spring Hill, twelve miles south of Franklin. He had marched but a little way when he fell in with a party of Confederates, with whom he skirmished. They were repulsed, and he moved on; but toward evening they again appeared, with an additional force, and boldly confronted him. Colburn halted and encamped for the night, and soon after moving forward the next morning, March 5. he was attacked by a greatly superi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
er asleep in the presence of danger. His troops, with the gun-boats Pawnee, John Adams, Huron, Mayflower, and Marblehead, in Stono and Folly rivers, were ready to receive the assailants, who were very easily repulsed. This accomplished, Terry, whose whole movement had been a feint, withdrew from James's Island, according to arrangement, to join in the meditated attack on Fort Wagner. In this engagement Terry lost about one hundred men, and Hagood about two hundred. In his report to General Jordan, Beauregard's chief of staff, General Ripley, in command of the defenses. of Charleston harbor, says: Brigadier-General Hagood succeeded in driving the enemy, about two thousand in number, from James's Island. He suppressed the fact that Hagood was repulsed, and that Terry left the island at his leisure for a more important field of action. In his order congratulating his troops for their success on the 10th, Gillmore, after saying they had moved three miles nearer Sumter, frankly
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