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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 148 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 78 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 40 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 38 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Horace Mann or search for Horace Mann in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 7 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
on have not settled —was for the first time disturbing politicians. Richard Fletcher was re-elected to Congress as the member for Boston. George Bancroft was appointed Collector of the Port, and Robert C. Winthrop chosen Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch, author of The Practical Navigator and translator of the Mecanique Celeste, ended a career dedicated to science. George Combe, of Edinburgh, was delivering lectures on phrenology in Boston. Horace Mann was urging with prodigious earnestness and industry the cause of education. Daniel Webster was about to sail for Europe on his only foreign journey. The Sirius and Great Western were traversing the Atlantic,—the beginning of that ocean steam-navigation which was to give a new force to civilization. The first arrival of the Sirius and,Great Western at New York was on April 23, 1838. Nineteen years earlier, the Savannah made a single experimental trip. At Harvard College and the La
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
which the author sends to you with his compliments. I send two copies of the fourteenth and fifteenth Reports of the Prison Discipline Society; also of the Institution for the Blind. Let me call your attention to the wonderful account in the Appendix to the latter of Laura Bridgman,—a girl deaf, dumb, and blind,—who has been taught the language of signs, and whose education has already advanced to a considerable extent. I have also sent you the reports of our Massachusetts Secretary Horace Mann. of the Board of Education, which are very interesting documents. I shall continue to send you all the things that I think will interest you. There is nothing of importance in jurisprudence. Judge Story is now engaged in a work on the Law of Partnership. I have just seen him. He desires to be remembered to you. He and all your friends here have sympathized with you in the death of your son. I am glad to hear of Grosch's health and prosperity, and hope he enjoyed himself in England.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
e's work for the blind; the movement for popular education which Horace Mann was directing; and the agitation for an improved prison disciplirnal, containing a part of the report, and some admirable remarks by Mann. He has recently returned from the convention at Utica, where, I amrt. I have been to-night with Howe to make a call at Savin Hill. Mann's oration is in press. I have read the proof. It is powerful and iof the North! On the day on which you delivered your discourse, Mr. Mann delivered one in Boston, which, it seems to me, is a most valuable this day produces two discourses uttered in the spirit of yours and Mann's. Believe me, my dear Buckingham, with the attachment of an anc never read the North American! I should like to send you my friend Mann's oration on the Fourth of July. It is the noblest production ever rculated in the country. It is a plea for education. To this cause Mann has devoted himself as an apostle. It is beautiful to see so much d
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
ame an inmate of No. 4. This building, at the corner of Court and Washington Streets, became quite famous from the number and ability of some of the men who occupied the rooms for many years. Among them were Rufus Choate, Theophilus Parsons, Horace Mann, George S. Hillard, Francis B. Crowninshield, Luther S. Cushing, John A. Andrew, Joel Giles, Edward G. Loring, John O. Sargent, Theophilus P. Chandler, and William G. Stearns. There was a great deal of law business done in the building; thered increasing usefulness, the recognition of your name and services by the world, and the blessings of all good men upon your head. But you deserve it all, dear Howe, and more,—if Heaven has any thing more for its most deserving children. I saw Mann to-day. He boards in Bowdoin Square, in the house called the Coolidge House. He has been preparing what I think will be a very elaborate report on his foreign travels, from which I anticipate great good. I have not seen his wife; but I understa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
years later; and among those who gave full credence to his intellectual and moral system was Horace Mann. Dr. Howe undertook to test both phrenology and animal magnetism by experiments. At his roongly on the good of humanity? The Texas treaty will be rejected by the Senate. ——has attacked Mann again; and Mann has pulverized him. His reply is admirable in truth, argument, and composition. Mann has pulverized him. His reply is admirable in truth, argument, and composition. We propose to have a tract, containing the whole controversy, published and distributed throughout the State. Let us put an iron heel upon the serpent of religious bigotry, trying to hug our schools so that I may hear from you there. I am very sorry that the pedagogues of Boston have assailed Mann, and wish I could have joined in your counsels for his defence. To you and to Mann I should say,Mann I should say, Moderation! I honor, almost revere, the zeal of the latter, and the ability by which it is sustained; but I sometimes doubt his judgment and taste. You are now at home, with your dear wife by your
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
on he took an active interest. He seconded Horace Mann's labors in this cause, Ante, Vol. II. pp. 196, 316. See letter of Mr. Mann to Sumner relative to a bequest for a charity. Mann's Life, p. 2Mann's Life, p. 246. and supported him in his controversy with the Boston schoolmasters upon points of school discipl in the Advertiser, March 12 and 21, 1844. Mr. Mann's report on European systems of education, wastitutional Convention. Several friends of Mr. Mann met, in the winter of 1844-45, with the view signed by twenty-four gentlemen, was sent to Mr. Mann. The latter was greatly cheered by this tribr own fireside! A personal testimonial to Mr. Mann was at first contemplated; but as this was fopal, Mr. Tillinghast, the following note from Mr. Mann: Mann's Life, pp. 249, 250. WrenthMann's Life, pp. 249, 250. Wrentham, Aug. 6, 1846. My dear Sumner,—The new Normal Schoolhouse at Bridgewater is to be dedicated onHorace Mann. Boston, June 23, 1845. my dear Mann,—I have this moment received yours of the 21st.[6 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
re Peleg W. Chandler in 1844, Charles Francis Adams in 1843, and Horace Mann in 1842. They each spoke with earnestness and power; the first title to a territory, Some of Sumner's friends, particularly Horace Mann and P. W. Chandler, took issue with this definition. he illustraopies. Would it be possible to print a cheap edition like that of Mr. Mann's noble oration? I beg you to excuse me for writing you this lett But no expression of opposite views troubled Sumner so much as Horace Mann's. He had counted on the sympathy of one so deeply interested in the welfare of mankind. Mr. Mann questioned Sumner's definition of war, maintaining that it had been sometimes waged, as by Holland against itrament of war. Ever sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Horace Mann. Court Street, Saturday [August], 1845. my dear Mann,—I was Mann,—I was pleased and troubled by your letter about my oration,—gratified that you thought so much about it, and pained that you did not think with it. <