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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles Marshall or search for Charles Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
At a small dinner party, composed of ex-Confederates, some years after the War, at which Col. Charles Marshall was present, the discussion turned upon the Gettysburg campaign, and those present were not a little startled, by Col. Marshall's declaring, that he had tried to have General Stuart court-martialled. Who? everyone exclaimed, not Jeb Stuart. Yes, Jeb Stuart, he said, and proceeded to ied the position he was expected to, but by his own confession had pursued a different course. Marshall proceeded to say, that in declining to adopt his report, General Lee did not question the accurm with the facts as I had stated them, unless they should be established by a court martial. Marshall added, that General Lee was excessively fond of Stuart as he was himself, that he possessed a msupporting distance. His headquarters were with Longstreet's corps at Chambersburg. Colonel Charles Marshall, General Lee's Military Secretary, was heard to say on one occasion, It is a fact which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
every word of the statements of Gen. Longstreet, Col. Marshall, Gen. Long, Col. Waiter Taylor, Gen. Fitz Lee anore be sent as fast as a courier could carry it. Col. Marshall testifies that it was long after 10 P. M., June that General Longstreet and Colonel Taylor and Colonel Marshall and General Long and General Lee himself, shoue and General Longstreet, and General Long and Colonel Marshall and Colonel Taylor were all mistaken in the bel. These doubtless were the orders written by Colonel Marshall the night of the 28th of June. General Earlurg, though he says so in his report, and though Col. Marshall says he himself sent orders to that effect to Hi. General Lee's report states it as a fact and Colonel Marshall says that he was sent for to General Lee's tenWas Lee than an automaton to do the bidding of Colonel Marshall, his military secretary? Again, in referriny's book the criticism that writer has passed on Col. Marshall's work in Lee's report: It is a fine example of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
time could have hauled the vast supplies needed at Richmond and Petersburg rapidly enough to have kept our armies from starving, or evacuating those cities nine months earlier than we did; as it was, we were weeks repairing the destruction on the road from Burkeville to Staunton River, and during that time every available wagon was called in use, and our quartermaster and commissary departments taxed to their utmost ingenuity until this connection was made over the damaged road. Colonel Charles Marshall, of General Lee's staff, on several occasions talked with me of the anxiety expressed by General Lee for the safety of the Danville Railroad at this crisis, and of his satisfaction and gratification at the result of this battle, and as a further mark of his appreciation expressed his pleasure in a congratulatory order sent to me soon thereafter, which I had read on dress parade, where it was received with much enthusiasm by the entire command, my men being proud of this recognition
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
mixed negro race does not now hold sway in this land of the brave, and home of the free. Those brave boys who sleep in Oakwood fought and died to save us from this thing, and their example stimulated the remnant to determine that they would lie in the cemetery with them before this thing should be. It is not a dream but a disgraceful fact that old Virginia, the home of Washington, the father of this country; of Jefferson, the author of the declaration of this country's independence; of Marshall, the great Chief Justice became district number one. Our children and those who come to live among us should have these things in remembrance. Our rightful position in the government which our fathers founded will depend upon whether we are true to the principles of constitutional liberty for which the flower of our land died; and to the principles of self-government, self-defense, selfrespect and loyalty to our traditions for which we have contended ever since Appomattox. By the good ha