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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 278 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 202 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 140 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 115 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 53 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 1: the Ante-bellum life of the author. (search)
of 1841 had the largest list of officers killed in action. Irons, Ayers, Ernst, Gantt, Morris, and Burbank were killed in the Mexican War. N. Lyon, R. S. Garnett, J. F. Reynolds, R. B. Garnett, A. W. Whipple, J. M. Jones, I. B. Richardson, and J. P. Garesche fell on the fields of the late war. Of the class of 1842 few were killed in action, but several rose to distinguished positions,--Newton, Eustis, Rosecrans, Lovell, Van Dorn, Pope, Sykes, G. W. Smith, M. L. Smith, R. H. Anderson, L. McLaws, D. H. Hill, A. P. Stewart, B. S. Alexander, N. J. T. Dana, and others. But the class next after us (1843) was destined to furnish the man who was to eclipse all,--to rise to the rank of general, an office made by Congress to honor his services; who became President of the United States, and for a second term; who received the salutations of all the powers of the world in his travels as a private citizen around the earth; of noble, generous heart, a lovable character, a valued friend,-
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 5: Round about Richmond. (search)
he Confederate field-works. General Johnston, who was at the rear, hurried Semmes's brigade of McLaws's division into the nearest redoubts, and ordered McLaws to call back another brigade. Kershaw McLaws to call back another brigade. Kershaw was ordered, and Manly's battery. The battery had to go at a run to be sure of their cover in the redoubts. Another battery was ordered by McLaws, who rode and took command. When Kershaw got to theMcLaws, who rode and took command. When Kershaw got to the fort, part of his men were deployed in the wood beyond, to his left. Meanwhile, the Federal cavalry was advancing, Gibson's horse artillery and Manly's Confederate battery were in severe combat, tter having the benefit of gun-proof parapets. Observing the approach of cavalry near his left, McLaws ordered two of Manly's guns into Fort Magruder, which, with the assistance of Kershaw's infantryction, and, with the assistance of others, gave Gibson's battery, in the open, serious trouble. McLaws ordered an advance of part of Semmes's brigade, led by Colonel Cummings. This, with the severe
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 6: the battle of Williamsburg. (search)
e a strong force at that point in time to meet and check the move. To that end he ordered Magruder to march at two A. M. on the 5th of May with D. R. Jones's and McLaws's divisions, to be followed by the divisions of G. W. Smith and D. H. Hill; Longstreet's division to cover the movement of his trains and defend Stuart's cavalry in case of severe pressure. Late in the afternoon of the 4th I was ordered to send a brigade to the redoubts to relieve McLaws's division. The brigades being small, I sent two, R. H. Anderson's and Pryor's, with Macon's battery, under Lieutenant Clopton, two guns under Captain Garrett, and two under Captain McCarthy, to report tes and by-ways, woodlands and fields, so that parts of our trains were stalled on the ground, where they stood during the night. It was dark when Anderson joined McLaws, who had drawn his men together in readiness to join the advance march. Anticipating an early march himself, Anderson occupied Fort Magruder and advanced his pi
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 7: Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks. (search)
e view of affairs as ordered, it may be well to explain that General Johnston ordered Smith's division by the Gaines road, so that, in case of delay of its march, McLaws's division, on that road and nearer the field of proposed action, could be brought in to the left of the battle, leaving the place of his division to be occupied by Smith's, when the latter reached McLaws's vacated line. There was, therefore, no reason why the orders for march should be misconstrued or misapplied. I was with General Johnston all of the time that he was engaged in planning and ordering the battle, heard every word and thought expressed by him of it, and received his verbe be ready to move by the Gaines road, coming as early as possible to the point at which the road to New Bridge turns off. Should there be cause for haste, Major-General McLaws, on your approach, will be ordered to leave his ground for you, that he may reinforce General Longstreet. Most respectfully your obedient servant, J. E
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 8: Sequels of Seven Pines. (search)
eet requests reinforcements and a diversion Council held McLaws alone sustains Longstreet's opposition to retiring severeould be ours. But just then he held a council with Generals McLaws and Whiting and Chief Engineer Stevens, and submitted tack continued? All voted in favor of the former except McLaws. In a letter, since written, he has said,--I alone urged and I was sent to learn your views. Ibid. Before General McLaws found me, I wrote General Smith,-- Can you reinforIf I cannot get help, I fear that I must fall back. General McLaws reported of his ride to my lines,--I went and found yohe assault, and wanted five thousand men. Letter from General McLaws. Nothing was sent in reply to McLaws's report, butMcLaws's report, but we soon learned that the left wing of the army was quiet and serene in defensive positions about the New Bridge fork of theved no more consideration than the appeal made through General McLaws. Then General Lee, having been assigned to command
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 12: Halleck and Pope in Federal command. (search)
ng attitude of the Confederates at Gordonsville caused apprehension at Washington, and induced the authorities to consider the withdrawal of McClellan's army to reinforce the army under Pope. Upon receipt of an intimation to that effect, General McClellan ordered a strong force under General Hooker to advance in threatening move against General Lee on the 4th of August. Hooker marched on the 5th, and occupied the ground of the battle of Malvern Hill. General Lee ordered the divisions of McLaws, D. R. Jones, that under Ripley (D. H. Hill's), and my own to march against Hooker. It was night when our troops were posted, and before daylight of the next morning Hooker had marched back to his camp at Harrison's Landing. Just here, as a digression from following the operations of the armies of Lee and Pope, it should be remarked that the latter, by injudicious and unsoldierly attitude assumed at the outstart of his campaign, intensely incensed the people of Virginia and the South ge
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. (search)
ad just been killed; just then a shell came screaming by, exploded, and dashed its fragments into the ground near enough to dust us a little. Dad drat those Yankees! he said; if I had known that they were going to throw such things as that at a fellow, I would have stayed in Texas. He had travelled a thousand miles to volunteer in the same company with his brother. Assured of the transfer of McClellan's forces from the James, General Lee called up the divisions of Generals D. H. Hill, McLaws, the half division under J. G. Walker, and Hampton's cavalry from Richmond. Anderson's division was marching from Orange Court-House as our reserve force. On the 22d, Munford's cavalry reported the Warrenton road open as far as the vicinity of General Pope's headquarters. General Stuart was ordered over, with parts of his brigades, to investigate and make trouble in the enemy's rear. He crossed at Waterloo and Hunt's Mill with fifteen hundred troopers and Pelham's horse artillery, and
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
sed to front and right flank of the army. General McLaws's division, General J. G. Walker, with tworry, march via Martinsburg to Bolivar Heights; McLaws's division by Crampton's Gap to Maryland Heighllow me to send R. H. Anderson's division with McLaws and to halt my own column near the point desigupply, and baggage trains of the army. General McLaws, with his own division and that of General commands of Generals Longstreet, Jackson, and McLaws, and with the main body of the cavalry will co behind. The commands of Generals Jackson, McLaws, and Walker, after accomplishing the objects fke. Not satisfied with the organization of McLaws's column, I asked and obtained permission on tby Turner's Gap and halted near Boonsborough. McLaws took the left-hand road, marched through Burki enemy at Harper's Ferry. Up to this hour General McLaws had heard nothing direct from Generals Jacrds the east and northeast, and rumors reached McLaws of the advance of the enemy from Frederick, bu[3 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 16: the lost order --South Mountain. (search)
closes some of the plans of the enemy, and shows most conclusively that the main rebel army is now before us, including Longstreet's, Jackson's, the two Hills's, McLaws's, Walker's, R. H. Anderson's, and Hood's commands. That army was ordered to march on the 10th, and to attack and capture our forces at Harper's Ferry and Martind him to march for the mountain pass at Crampton's Gap, to seize the pass if it was not strongly guarded, and march for Rohrersville, to cut off the command under McLaws about Maryland Heights, capture it, and relieve the garrison at Harper's Ferry, and return to co-operate in capturing the balance of the Confederate army north of to make the stand at Turner's Pass, and ordered the troops to march next morning, ordering a brigade left at Hagerstown to guard the trains. No warning was sent McLaws to prepare to defend his rear, either by the commanding general or by the chief of cavalry. The hallucination that McClellan was not capable of serious work seem
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 17: preliminaries of the great battle. (search)
he rode himself to Maryland Heights to see General McLaws, and to witness the operations at Harper'sbellion Record, vol. XIX. part i. p. 183. General McLaws had ordered General Cobb's brigade and the range was too great for effective work. That McLaws was not prepared for the sudden onslaught is e them with a battery as a rallying-point. General McLaws reformed his line about a mile and a half were moving south from Hagerstown. We left McLaws in possession of Maryland Heights, on the 14th Bolivar Heights. General Jackson sent word to McLaws and Walker that the batteries were not to openle later all the batteries, including those of McLaws and Walker. The signal ordered for the stormider directed the commands of Generals Jackson, McLaws, and Walker, after accomplishing the objects fseemed to be possible that Jackson would order McLaws and Walker up the Rohrersville road, and move captured property), then ordered Walker's and McLaws's troops to follow his march. With his report
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