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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 124 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 92 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 72 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 35 1 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 32 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for James Otis or search for James Otis in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 4 document sections:

. His advancement by Sir Robert Walpole, who shunned men of talents as latent rivals, was owing to his rank, wealth, influence over boroughs, and personal imbecility. For nearly four-and-twenty years he remained minister for British America; yet to the last, the statesman, who was deeply versed in chap. I.} 1748. the statistics of elections, knew little of the continent of which he was the guardian. He addressed letters, it used to be confidently said, to the island of New England, James Otis on the Rights of the Colonies. Ms. Letter of J. Q. Adams. and could not tell but that Jamaica was in the Mediterranean. Walpole's Memoires of the last ten years of the reign of George II. Heaps of colonial memorials and letters remained unread in his office; and a paper was almost sure of neglect, unless some agent remained with him to see it opened. Memoires, &c., i. 343. Gov. Clinton, of New-York, to the Earl of Lincoln, April, 1748. His frivolous nature could never glow with affe
Acts of Trade; by the utmost exertion of arbitrary and irresponsible discretion; as well as the degree of political support which the judiciary would grant to the intended new system of administration. Public opinion selected for the vacancy James Otis, of Barnstable, a good lawyer, a member chap. XVI.} 1760. of the Council, and acceptable to the community. Besides, former governors had promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointedr, a lawyer of great merit, a man of sagacity and patriotism, respected for learning, ability, purity of life, and moderation, discerned the dangerous character of Hutchinson's ambition, and from this time denounced him openly and always; while James Otis, the younger, offended as a son and a patriot, resigned the office of advocate-general, and by his eloquence in opposition to the royalists, set the province in a flame. But the new chief justice received the iterated application for writs of
this case not applicable to America. But James Otis, a native of Barnstable, whose irritable nat Authorities to be relied on for this speech of Otis are the contemporary ones: 1. The minutes take the totality of the influence and doctrines of Otis, as developed on various occasions during the ye writs of assistance. But of that warm speech Otis himself published a report which may be read and in Boston till the year 1764. On page 294, Mr. Otis is said to have quoted, in 1761, a remark firvest any fact of its proper coloring. Thus did Otis lay a foundation for independence. His chap. urt, after hearing the arguments of Thacher and Otis, the friends to liberty, inclined to their sidery statutes which it was appointed to enforce. Otis endeavored to compel a restitution of the third unbounded and very general enthusiasm, elected Otis one of their representatives to the Assembly. ops; while Massachusetts, under the guidance of Otis, dismissed the Episcopalian Bollan, its pedanti[4 more...]
ng on a ship and sloop, that were to cruise against privateers, for the protection of fishermen. Otis, in September, 1762, seized the opportunity in a report to claim the right of originating all taxthe insinuation under color of which that sacred and well beloved name is brought into question. Otis, who was fiery, but not obstinate, erased the offensive words, as his sentiments were fully expref being a Briton rather than a Frenchman, consisted in liberty. As a question of national law, Otis maintained the rights of a colonial assembly to be equal to those of the House of Commons, and tof Massachusetts, it was held, were safe under the shelter of its charter and the common law; yet Otis did not fail to cite, also, the preamble to the British statute of 1740, for naturalizing foreignd power, to vindicate the liberty of his country and the rights of mankind. The Vindication of Otis filled the town of Boston with admiration of the patriotism of its author, and the boldness of hi