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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 14 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 12 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 12 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Chalcis (Greece) or search for Chalcis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 164 (search)
Chorus To the sandy beach of sea-coast Aulis I have come after a voyage through the tides of narrow Euripus, leaving Chalcis, my city which feeds the waters of far-famed Arethusa near the sea, so that I might behold the army of the Achaeans and the ships rowed by those godlike heroes; for our husbands tell us that fair-haired Menelaus and high-born Agamemnon are leading them to Troy on a thousand ships in quest of Helen, whom Paris the herdsman carried off from the banks of reedy Eurotas, his gift from Aphrodite, when that queen of Cyprus entered beauty's contest with Hera and Pallas at the gushing fountain.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 590 (search)
Chorus of Argive men Oh! great is the bliss the great enjoy. Behold Iphigenia, the king's child, my lady, and Clytemnestra, the daughter of Tyndareus; how proud their lineage! how high their pinnacle of fortune! These mighty ones, whom wealth attends, are very gods in the eyes of less favored folk. Chorus Let us stand here, maidens of Chalcis, and lift the queen from her chariot to the ground without stumbling, supporting her gently in our arms, with kind intent, that the renowned daughter of Agamemnon, just arrived, may feel no fear; strangers ourselves, let us avoid anything that may disturb or frighten the strangers from Argos.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1475 (search)
Iphigenia Lead me away, the destroyer of Ilium's town and the Phrygians; give me wreaths to cast about me; bring them here; here are my tresses to crown; bring lustral water too. Dance to Artemis, queen Artemis the blest, around her shrine and altar; for by the blood of my sacrifice I will blot out the oracle, if it must be. O mother, lady revered! I will, not give you my tears; for at the holy rites it is not fitting. Sing with me, maidens, sing the praises of Artemis, whose temple faces Chalcis, where angry spearmen madly chafe, here in the narrow havens of Aulis, because of me. O Pelasgia, land of my birth, and Mycenae, my home!