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Pausanias, Description of Greece 256 0 Browse Search
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Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 80 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 74 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Argos (Greece) or search for Argos (Greece) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
ia; Atalanta, daughter of Schoeneus, from Arcadia; Amphiaraus, son of Oicles, from Argos. With them came also the sons of Thestius. And when they were assembled, Oeneus entertaindiffer as to whom Tydeus killed, but they agree that he fled from Calydon to Adrastus at Argos, and that Adrastus purified him from the murder (Eustathius and Scholiast on Hom. Il. xihis daughter to wife. Compare Apollodorus, iii.6.1. Being arraigned by Agrius, he fled to Argos and came to Adrastus, whose daughter Deipyle he married and begat Diomedes. Tydeus 2nd ed.), pp. 536ff. Nevertheless Diomedes afterwards came secretly with Alcmaeon from Argos and put to death all the sons of Agrius, except Onchestus and Thersites, who had fled bethearth of Telephus in Arcadia, and killed him. But Diomedes conveyed the corpse to Argos and buried him in the place where now a city is called Oenoe after him.Compare Paus. 2.25
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
received the daughter of Neleus he gave her to his brother. For a time he continued to dwell in Messene, but when Dionysus drove the women of Argos mad, he healed them on condition of receiving part of the kingdom, and settled down there with Bias.See below, Apollod. 2.2.2; Diod. 2.68.4; Paus. 2 the ship put to sea. So Polyphemus founded a city Cius in Mysia and reigned as king;Compare Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.1321ff., 1345ff. but Hercules returned to Argos. However Herodorus says that Hercules did not sail at all at that time, but served as a slave at the court of Omphale. But Pherecydes says that he watook in the voyage of the Argo. See Scholiast on Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.1290. In saying that Herakles was left behind in Mysia and returned to Argos, our author follows, as usual, the version of Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.1273ff. According to another version, after Herakles was left behind by the
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Ocean and Tethys had a son Inachus, after whom a river in Argos is called Inachus.As to Inachus and his descendants,elites from Egypt took place during the reign of Inachus at Argos. See Eusebius, Praeparatio Evangelii, x.10.10ff. Oniii.27, 28. As to Apia as a name for Peloponnese or Argos, see Aesch. Supp. 260ff.; Paus. 2.5.7; Scholiast othe kingdom and called the Peloponnese after himself Argos; and having married Evadne, daughter of Strymon and us, including the settlement of Danaus and his daughters at Argos, is quoted verbally, with a few omissions and changtemple Lindien (Copenhagen, 1912). Thence he came to Argos and the reigning king Gelanor surrendered the kingdous, Fab. 169. But the sons of Egyptus came to Argos, and exhorted Danaus to lay aside his enmity, and bewere buried on the Larisa, the acropolis of Argos, and the headless trunks were buried at Lerna. and
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Lynceus reigned over Argos after Danaus and begat a son Abas by Hypermnestra; and Abas had twin sons Acrisius and ProetusWith this and what follows compare Paus. 2.16.2, Paus. 2.25.7. by Aglaia, daughter of Mantineus. Thhe course of the war they were the first to invent shields. And Acrisius gained the mastery and drove Proetus from Argos; and Proetus went to Lycia to the court of Iobates or, as some say, of Amphianax, and married his daughter, 8.6.8. They divided the whole of the Argive territory between them and settled in it, Acrisius reigning over Argos and Proetus over Tiryns. And Acrisius had a daughter Danae by Eurydice, daughter of Lacedaemon, and Proetuccording to Diodorus Siculus, with whom Pausanias in the same passage (Paus. 2.18.4) agrees, the king of Argos at the time of the affair was not Proetus but Anaxagoras, son of Megapenthes. As to Megapenthes, see Apollod. 2.4
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
herself with the goddess even in beauty. Perseus hastened with Danae and Andromeda to Argos in order that he might behold Acrisius. But he, learning of this and dreading the oracle,that he would be killed by the son of Danae. See above, Apollod. 2.4.1. forsook Argos and departed to the Pelasgian land. Now Teutamides, king of Larissa, was holding athletic Alexandria, Protrept. iii.45, p. 39, ed. Potter. and being ashamed to return to Argos to claim the inheritance of him who had died by his hand, he went to Megapenthes, son of Proetus, at Tiryns and effected an exchange with him, surrendering Argos into his hands.As to this exchange of kingdoms, compare Paus. 2.16.3. So Megapenthes reigned over the Argives, xiv.323. Hence Sthenelus laid hold of this pretext to banish Amphitryon from the whole of Argos, while he himself seized the throne of Mycenae and Tiryns; and he entrusted Midea
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
rent account of the death of Tisamenus. He says that, being expelled from Lacedaemon and Argos by the returning Heraclids, king Tisamenus led an army to Achaia and there fell in a bateus, and sacrificed upon them, and cast lots for the cities. So the first drawing was for Argos, the second for Lacedaemon, and the third for Messene. And they brought a pitcher of water, and And on the altars on which they sacrificed they found signs lying: for they who got Argos by the lot found a toad; those who got Lacedaemon found a serpent; and those who gith any evidence, other than that of Apollodorus, as to the association of the toad with Argos. As to these signs the seers said that those who found the toad had better stay in the ci army decided that the kingdom belonged to HyrnethoThe grave of Hyrnetho was shown at Argos, but she is said to have been accidentally killed by her brother Phalces near Epidaurus,
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
Apollod. 3.10.3; Scholiast on Pind. P. 3.54(96); Hyginus, Fab. 49; Hyginus, Ast. ii.14. In a Tongan tradition a dead boy is brought to life by being covered with the leaves of a certain tree. See Père Reiter, “Traditions Tonguinnes,” Anthropos, xii.-xi (1917-1918), pp. 1036ff.; and Frazer's Appendix to Apollodorus, “The Resurrection of Glaucus.” Minos had now got back his son, but even so he did not suffer Polyidus to depart to Argos until he had taught Glaucus the art of divination. Polyidus taught him on compulsion, and when he was sailing away he bade Glaucus spit into his mouth. Glaucus did so and forgot the art of divination.It is said that when Cassandra refused to grant her favours to Apollo in return for the gift of prophecy which he had bestowed on her, he spat into her mouth and so prevented her from convincing anybody of the truth of her prophecies. See Serv. Verg
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ld beast.In these lines Apollodorus has summarized the argument of the Bacchae of Euripides; for the death of Pentheus, see Eur. Ba. 1043ff. Compare Hyginus, Fab. 184; Ov. Met. 3.511ff., especially 701ff.; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. p. 103 (Second Vatican Mythographer 83). Aeschylus wrote a tragedy on the subject of Pentheus (TGF (Nauck 2nd ed.), pp. 60ff.). And having shown the Thebans that he was a god, Dionysus came to Argos, and there again, because they did not honor him, he drove the women mad, and they on the mountains devoured the flesh of the infants whom they carried at their breasts.The reference is to the madness of the daughters of Proetus. See above, Apollod. 2.2.2 note. And wishing to be ferried across from Icaria to Naxos he hired a pirate ship of Tyrrhenians. But when they had put him on board, they sailed past Naxos and made for Asia, int
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
cles was the first to rule, and would not hand over the kingdom. So, being banished from Thebes, Polynices came to Argos, taking with him the necklace and the robe.That is, the necklace and the robe which Cadmus had given to Harmonia at their marriage. See above, Apollod. 3.4.2. The king of Argos was Adrastus, son of Talaus; and Polynices went up to his palace by night and engaged in a fight with Tydeus, son of Oeneus, who had fled from Calydon.See icles; Capaneus, son of Hipponous; Hippomedon, son of Aristomachus, but some say of Talaus. These came from Argos; but Polynices, son of Oedipus, came from Thebes; Tydeus, son of Oeneus, was an Aetolian; Parthenopaeus, so See Frazer, commentary on Pausanias, vol. iv. pp. 406ff. According to Diod. 4.65.9 Adrastus returned to Argos. But Pausanias says (Paus. 1.43.1) that he died at Megara of old age and grief at his son's death, when he was le
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
from the rock in support of his claim, and this version of the story seems to have been accepted by Virgil (Geo. i.12ff.), but it is not countenanced by Greek writers. The Athenians said that the contest between Poseidon and Athena took place on the second of the month Boedromion, and hence they omitted that day from the calendar. See Plut. De fraterno amore 11; Plut. Quaest. Conviv. ix.6. The unlucky Poseidon also contested the possession of Argos with Hera, and when the judges gave a verdict against him and in favour of the goddess, he took his revenge, as in Attica, by flooding the country. See Paus. 2.22.4; compare Paus. 2.15.5; Polemo, Greek History, cited by the Scholiast on Aristides, vol. iii. p. 322, ed. Dindorf. After him came Athena, and, having called on Cecrops to witness her act of taking possession, she planted an olive tree, which is still shown in the Pandrosium.The ol
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