hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 26 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 8 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 6 0 Browse Search
Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Dodona (Greece) or search for Dodona (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
ooner did Pelias hear that than he bade him go in quest of the fleece. Now it was at Colchis in a grove of Ares, hanging on an oak and guarded by a sleepless dragon.See Ap. Rhod., Argon. ii.1268-1270, iv.123ff. 163. Sent to fetch the fleece, Jason called in the help of Argus, son of Phrixus; and Argus, by Athena's advice, built a ship of fifty oars named Argo after its builder; and at the prow Athena fitted in a speaking timber from the oak of Dodona.Compare Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.524ff., iv.580ff.; Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 175. The following narrative of the voyage of the Argo is based mainly on the Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius. As to the voyage of the Argonauts, see further Pind. P. 4.156(276)ff.; Diod. 4.40-49; Orphica, Argonautica; Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 175; Hyginus, Fab. 12, 14-23; Ov. Met. 7.1ff.; Valerius Flaccus, Argon. When the ship was built
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ame to the lake Pambotis in Epirus, where he fell in with some people camping under blankets supported by spears, of which the blades were stuck into the earth. Compare Scholiast on Hom. Od. iii.188, who adds that, “having laid waste Molossia, he begot Molossus by Andromache, and from Molossus is descended the race of the kings of Molossia, as Eratosthenes relates.” The lake Pambotis is believed to be what is now called the lake of Joannina, near which Dodona was situated. Paus. 1.11.1 mentions that Pyrrhus (Neoptolemus) settled in Epirus “in compliance with the oracles of Helenus,” and that he had Molossus, Pielus, and Pergamus by Andromache. and having vanquished the Molossians in battle he reigned as king and begat Molossus on Andromache. And Helenus founded a city in Molossia and inhabited it, and Neoptolemus gave him his mother Deidamia to wife.As to Deidamia, mother of Neoptolemus,