hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 276 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 138 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 66 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 58 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 52 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 38 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracles (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 36 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 34 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 34 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Bacchae (ed. T. A. Buckley) 32 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb). You can also browse the collection for Thebes (Greece) or search for Thebes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 10 document sections:

Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 100 (search)
Enter the Chorus on the right.Chorus Shaft of the sun, fairest light of all that have dawned on Thebes of the seven gates, you have shone forth at last, eye of golden day, advancing over Dirce's streams!You have goaded with a sharper bit the warrior of the white shield, who came from Argos in full armor, driving him to headlong retreat.
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 148 (search)
ChorusBut since Victory whose name is glory has come to us, smiling in joy equal to the joy of chariot-rich Thebes,let us make for ourselves forgetfulness after the recent wars, and visit all the temples of the gods with night-long dance and song. And may Bacchus, who shakes the earth of Thebes, rule our dancing! ChorusBut since Victory whose name is glory has come to us, smiling in joy equal to the joy of chariot-rich Thebes,let us make for ourselves forgetfulness after the recent wars, and visit all the temples of the gods with night-long dance and song. And may Bacchus, who shakes the earth of Thebes, rule our dancing!
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 162 (search)
e, and that only whenwe sail her on a straight course can we make true friends. Such are the rules by which I strengthen this city. Akin to these is the edict which I have now published to the citizenry concerning the sons of Oedipus: Eteocles, who fell fightingin behalf of our city and who excelled all in battle, they shall entomb and heap up every sacred offering that descends to the noblest of the dead below. But as for his brother, Polyneices, I mean, who on his return from exile wanted to burn to the groundthe city of his fathers and his race's gods, and wanted to feed on kindred blood and lead the remnant into slavery—it has been proclaimed to the city that no one shall give him funeral honors or lamentation,but all must leave him unburied and a sight of shame, with his body there for birds and dogs to eat. This is my will, and never will I allow the traitor to stand in honor before the just. But whoever has good will to Thebes,he shall be honored by me in death as in lif
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 724 (search)
hould look to my conduct, not to my years. Creon Is it worthy conduct to honor disrupters? Haemon I could not urge anyone to show respect for the wicked. Creon And is she not in the grasp of that disease? Haemon All the people of this city of Thebes deny it. Creon Shall Thebes prescribe to me how I must rule? Haemon See, there, how you have spoken so much like a child. Creon Am I to rule this land by the will of another than myself? Haemon That is no city, which belongs to one man. CreoThebes prescribe to me how I must rule? Haemon See, there, how you have spoken so much like a child. Creon Am I to rule this land by the will of another than myself? Haemon That is no city, which belongs to one man. Creon Does not the city by tradition belong to the man in power? Haemon You would make a fine monarch in a desert. Creon This boy seems to be fighting on the side of the woman. Haemon If you are a woman, for, to be sure, my concern is for you. Creon You traitor, attacking your father, accusing him! Haemon Because I see you making a mistake and committing injustice. Creon Am I making a mistake when I respect my own prerogatives? Haemon Yes. You do not respect them, when you trample on the god
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 839 (search)
Antigone Ah, you mock me! In the name of our fathers' gods,why do you not wait to abuse me until after I have gone, and not to my face, O my city, and you, her wealthy citizens? Ah, spring of Dirce, and you holy ground of Thebes whose chariots are many,you, at least, will bear me witness how unwept by loved ones, and by what laws I go to the rock-closed prison of my unheard-of tomb! Ah, misery!I have no home among men or with the shades, no home with the living or with the dead.
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 929 (search)
this her guards will have reason to lament their slowness. Antigone Ah, no! That command verges close on death. Creon I cannot console you with any hope that your doom is not to be fulfilled in that way. Antigone O city of my fathers, land of Thebes, and you gods, our ancestors! I am led away now; there is no more delay!Look at me, you who are Thebes' lords—look at the only remaining daughter of the house of your kings. See what I suffer, and at whose hands, because I revered reverence!Ant to lament their slowness. Antigone Ah, no! That command verges close on death. Creon I cannot console you with any hope that your doom is not to be fulfilled in that way. Antigone O city of my fathers, land of Thebes, and you gods, our ancestors! I am led away now; there is no more delay!Look at me, you who are Thebes' lords—look at the only remaining daughter of the house of your kings. See what I suffer, and at whose hands, because I revered reverence!Antigone is led away by the gua
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 988 (search)
Enter Teiresias, led by a boy, on the spectators' right. Teiresias Princes of Thebes, we have come on a shared journey, two scouting the way by the eyes of one.For this is the method of travel for the blind, using a guide. Creon What is it, old Teiresias? What is your news? Teiresias I will tell you. You, obey the seer. Creon It was not my habit before, at any rate, to stand apart from your will. Teiresias Therefore you captained this city on an upright course. Creon I have felt and can attest your benefits. Teiresias Realize that once more now you are poised on fortune's razor-edge. Creon What do you mean? I shudder to hear you! Teiresias You will understand, when you hear the signs revealed by my art. As I took my place on my old seat of augurywhere all birds regularly gather for me, I heard an unintelligible voice among them: they were screaming in dire frenzy that made their language foreign to me. I realized that they were ripping each other with their talons, mu
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 1115 (search)
Chorus God of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reignin the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes, the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soilof the sowing of the savage dragon's teeth!
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 1126 (search)
Chorus The smoky glare of torches sees you above the cliffs of the twin peaks, where the Corycian nymphs move inspired by your godhead,and Castalia's stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa's hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words,you visit the avenues of Thebes.
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 1137 (search)
Chorus Thebes of all cities you hold foremost in honor, together with your lightning-struck mother.And now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus,or over the groaning straits!