hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 276 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 138 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 66 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 58 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 52 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 38 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracles (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 36 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 34 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 34 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Bacchae (ed. T. A. Buckley) 32 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Thebes (Greece) or search for Thebes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE SUBJECT (search)
THE SUBJECT CREON, King of Thebes, being at war with the Teleboans or Taphians, under the command of Ptereias, sends an army against them. This is commanded by Amphitryon, who leaves his wife Alcmena pregnant at his departure from Thebes. During his absence from home, Jupiter, assuming his form, and Mercury that of his servant SoThebes. During his absence from home, Jupiter, assuming his form, and Mercury that of his servant Sosia, present themselves to Alcmena, as though just returned from the expedition against the Taphians. By means of this stratagem, Jupiter is admitted to the embraces of Alcmena. While Mercury is keeping watch at the door of Amphitryon's house, Sosia, who has just arrived at Thebes with Amphitryon, makes his appearance for the purpThebes with Amphitryon, makes his appearance for the purpose of announcing to Alcmena his master's return. Mercury, pretending that he himself is the real Sosia, and that the other is an impostor, drives him away from the door. He goes back to his master, who returns with him to the house, and on meeting Alcmena, she denies his assertion that he has but that moment returned from the exp
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene prol (search)
ame; he aided them. Besides, surely in Tragedy he has a place. This play, I say, Jupiter himself will take a part in this day, and I together with him. Now do you give attention while I shall relate to you the subject of this Comedy. This city is Thebes; in that house there pointing, AmphitryonAmphitryon: Perseus was the son of Jupiter and Danaë. By Andromeda, he was the father of Alcæus, Sthenelus, Nestor, and Electryon. Alcæus was the father of Amphitryon, while Electryon was the father of Alcmena, by Lysidice, the daughter of Pelops. Amphitryon, having accidentally slain Electryon, fled with his daughter Alcmena, who had been betrothed to him, to the court of Creon, King of Thebes. The brother of Alcmena having been slain by the Teleboans or Taphians, who inhabited certain islands on the coast of Acarnania, Amphitryon undertook an expedition against them, at the head of the forces of Creon. dwells, born at Argos, of an Argive sire; whose wife is Alcmena, daughter of Electryon. This
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 1 (search)
nd gloryAnd glory: "Adoreâ." This was literally the allowance or largest of corn which was distributed to troops after a victory; hence it figuratively signifies "honor" or "glory.", too, has he loaded his fellow-citizens, and for Creon, King of Thebes, has he firmly fixed his sway. From the harbour he has sent me before him to his house that I may bear these tidings to his wife, how he has promoted the public good by his guidance, conduct, and command. This now will I consider, in what manner laid hands on meLaid hands on me: "Usufecisti." "Usufacere" was a term used in law, to signify the taking possession of a thing by the laying of hands thereon. this, Sosia means to say, Mercury has most effectually done.. Help, help, citizens of Thebes. MERCURY striking him. MERCURY What, still bawling, you scoundrel? Speak--what have you come for? SOSIA For there to be somebody for you to belabour with your fists. MERCURY Whose are you? SOSIA Amphitryon's Sosia, I tell you. MERCURY For this r