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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ng this affair and witnessed the movement, which was admirably executed, all the officers and men keeping their places like real soldiers. Immediately throwing forward a strong line of skirmishers in front of each brigade, we found the enemy re-enforcing his front skirmishers, but the woods were so dense as completely to mask his operations. An irregular piece of cleared land lay immediately in front of General Denver's position, and extended obliquely to the left in front of and across Morgan Smith's and Veatch's brigades, which were posted on the right and left of the main Corinth road, looking directly south. For some time I was in doubt whether the artillery fire we had sustained had come from the enemy's fixed or field batteries, and intended to move forward at great hazard to ascertain the fact, when about 3 p. m. we were startled by the quick rattle of musketry along our whole picket line, followed by the cheers and yells of an attacking column of the enemy. Our artillery
ent during the affair, and witnessed the movement, which was admirably executed, all the officers and men keeping their places like real soldiers. Immediately throwing forward a line of skirmishers in front of each brigade, we found the enemy reenforcing his front skirmishers; but the woods were so dense as to completely mask his operations. An irregular piece of cleared land lay immediately in front of Gen. Denver's position, and extended obliquely to the left, in front of and across Morgan Smith's and Veatch's brigades, which were posted on the right and left of the main Corinth road, leading directly south. For some time I was in doubt whether the artillery fire we had sustained had come from the enemy's fixed or field-batteries, and intended to move forward at great hazard to ascertain the fact, when, about three P. M., we were startled by the quick rattle of musketry along our whole picket-line, followed by the cheers and yells of an attacking column of the enemy. Our arti
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
rew, have promptly returned to the right bank to take more passengers. Thus Morgan Smith's division was soon collected on the opposite shore. The pontonniers likewirigade columns deployed on two lines at whole distances, advance en ├ęchelon. Morgan Smith, ahead on the left, moves along the Chickamauga; John Smith is in the centred in the rear, ready to face the enemy if he presents himself on that side. Morgan Smith arrives, without firing a gun, on the last slopes of Missionary Ridge, which posted at the entrance to the ravine, ready to support Ewing. On the left, Morgan Smith, leaving Lightburn behind him, has remaining, to approach the northern extre arrive about eleven o'clock in the rear of the Fifteenth corps. However, Morgan Smith, who forms Sherman's left, after having cleared the ravine and ascended verym to take a position on his left, between the summit of the hill occupied by Morgan Smith and the Chickamauga, near Boyce's Station. He also leaves the whole of Dav
s in the battle of Seven Pines and the seven days fight around Richmond; was next assigned to duty as Colonel of the 4th Virginia cavalry, and subsequently to a battery of artillery that gained distinction in the second battle of Manassas and at Sharpsburg. When a commander was needed for the defences of Vicksburg in the fall of 1862, President Davis sent him to defend the stronghold of Mississippi, having conferred upon him the rank of Brigadier General. he commanded at the battle of Chickasaw Bayou, above Vicksburg, where, in December, 1862, he whipped Sherman and Morgan Smith, who brought a large force against his heroic little band. At the battle of Baker's Creek he commanded a brigade of Georgians, and during the siege of Vicksburg held that portion of Stevenson's line so furiously assaulted on the 19th and 22d of May. Shortly after the surrender Gen. Lee was appointed to the rank of Major General, and assigned to the command of all the cavalry in the Mississippi Department.
isely and injudiciously. The fifteen wounded men are in the hospital, and are attended to by the surgeon of the Kearsage and by the surgeon of the Rappahannock, who came over from Paris yesterday. I have not yet seen them, but shall do so to-day, and by the next mail will give you much further particulars. Some of the paroled officers have gone to Paris to-day, and the men are walking about the streets. I met Captain Winslow last evening in company with the surgeon and purser Smith, at the American Consular Agent's. I am greatly indebted to all these gentlemen, and particularly to the purser, who has sat up with me nearly all night detailing the particulars which I have given you. The officers are of course in high spirits. Capt. Winslow is evidently as modest as he is brave and determined. He is a short, thick set, good natured looking man, of about fifty, and is looked upon by the people here as a great hero. Another strong letter from the Northwest--a L