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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 374 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 130 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 113 13 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 74 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 7 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Capture of the Indianola. (search)
dicate the truth of history by transmitting to you the order of General Taylor organizing the expedition, the official report of the engagemene Western armies, would be interrupted and destroyed. Major-General Richard Taylor, then commanding the Western District of Louisiana, fullexandria, and while she was being repaired, information reached General Taylor that the Indianola had run past the Vicksburg batteries, and the control of the river was again wrested from us. General Taylor, whose marvelous energy is well known to all who ever served under him, puof the Mississippi river between Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and General Taylor was able to forward immense supplies to Port Hudson and Vicksbuh other manner as circumstances may direct. By command of Major-General Taylor. E. Surget, A. A. General Major-General R. Taylor's gunMajor-General R. Taylor's gunboat expedition, C. S. S. Webb, thirty miles below Vicksburg, off prize Ironclad Indianola, February 25th, 1863. Maj. E. Surget, A. A. Gen.:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
roe and Jackson, served each eight years, forty years in all, just one-half the life of the nation. Tyler, Polk, Lincoln and Johnson, served each four years, and Taylor one. Of the twenty-three years under Northern Presidents, John and John Quincy Adams, Van Buren, Pierce and Buchanan, served each four years, and Fillmore three. The second Adams was not the choice of the people, and was elected by the House of Representatives. Mr. Fillmore was elevated by the death of President Taylor. So up to the period of the new kind of voting, the people had really never elected but four Northern men to the Presidency. It is remarkable, too, that the people have e Southern Presidents were re-elected, and all of them were succeeded by Presidents of the same political faith, except perhaps Mr. Polk, who was succeeded by General Taylor, running upon a no party platform. The country endorsed Polk's administration and did not repudiate him, as he declined a renomination. Another curious fact
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
000. There were three brigades in each division — in Jackson's, the Stonewall (Winder's), Taliaferro's, and J. R. Jones's; and in Ewells, Elzey's, Trimble's, and Taylor's (Louisiana). These brigades had gone through a very active and harassing campaign in the Valley, Jackson's having fought at Kernstown, McDowell, Middletown, Winas reported to me by regimental commanders. One regiment (the Forty-fourth Virginia) had just 44 men present — the precise number of the regiment. Trimble's and Taylor's brigades were smaller than Elzey's, having four regiments each and an extra battalion in Taylor's; though there is a strange inconsistency in General Trimble's Taylor's; though there is a strange inconsistency in General Trimble's reports, which, doubtless, is the result of an error in copying or printing. In his report of Cross Keys, page 80, volume I., he says: My three regiments [Fifteenth Alabama, Sixteenth Mississippi, and Twenty-first Georgia], counting 1,348 men and officers, repulsed the brigade of Blenker three times. His other regiment (the Twen
nsequence of the incapacity of the boat to accommodate them. Upon the arrival of the remains at Algiers they were placed by the pallbearers in the ladies' parlor of the depot-building of the Opelousas Railroad, where they were left in charge of Lieutenant John Crowley, who lost a hand at Belmont and an arm at Shiloh, and others who were maimed while serving under the deceased in his last great battle. Among the pall-bearers, besides Beauregard, Bragg, Buckner, and Hood, were Generals Richard Taylor, Longstreet, Gibson, and Harry Hays. All the papers were full of testimonials to the goodness and greatness of the deceased. On the morning of January 24th the Texas committee, consisting of Colonel Ashbel Smith, Hon. D. W. Jones, Hon. M. G. Shelley, and Major Ochiltree, took charge of the remains of General Johnston, and conveyed them by the Opelousas Railroad to Brashear City. At Terrebonne, some fifty ladies, headed by Mrs. Bragg, strewed the coffin with fresh flowers an
horne. anecdote by Lieutenant J. M. Fairbanks. Scott and Davis almost agree. estimate by Judge Ballinger, by Colonel W. J. Green, by Governor I. G. Harris, by President Jefferson Davis, by Major Alfriend, by professor A. T. Bledsoc, by General Richard Taylor. epitaph by John B. S. Dimitry. a filial estimate. the end. It has been the writer's aim in this biography to let a truthful narrative of facts reveal the character of its subject. He has not been prepossessed with any especial idewriter, There is no measuring such a man as Davis; and this high tribute had a fitting counterpart in that which Davis paid Johnston, when discussing in the Federal Senate the Utah Expedition. This tribute has been already quoted. General Richard Taylor, in the advanced sheets of his Reminiscences, published March, 1878, in the Southern historical society papers, says: Shiloh. Shiloh was a great misfortune. At the moment of his fall, Sidney Johnston, with all the energy of his nat
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
The last Confederate surrender. Lieutenant General Richard Taylor. To write an impartial and unprejudiced account of exciting contemporary events has always been a difficult peculiar flavor of bitterness. But slight sketches of minor incidents, by actors and eye-witnesses, may prove of service to the future writer, who undertakes the more ambitious and severe duty of historian. The following memoir pour server has this object. In the summer of 1864, after the close of the Red river campaign, I was ordered to cross the Mississippi, and report my arrival on the east bank by telegraph to Richmond. All the fortified posts on the river were held by the Federals, and the intermediate portions possible, prevent, passage. This delayed the transmission of the order above-mentioned until August, when I crossed at a point just above the mouth of the Red river. On a dark night, in a small canoe, with horses swimming alongside, I got over without attracting the attention of a gunboa
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 4: life in Lexington. (search)
tial visit in his study, to lay before him his spiritual interests. He told him the steps he had taken, and declared his hope of his acceptance with God through our Lord Jesus Christ; but said that he had not then: been able to determine with what branch of the Church to connect himself. Popery he had examined under the most favorable auspices, and he had been constrained to reject it as an apostasy from the system of Holy Writ. Of Episcopacy he had learned something from his friends Colonel Taylor and the Rev. Mr. Parks, whose religious principles and feelings he, to a great extent, approved and embraced; but with some of the features of that system he was not satisfied. He had given equal consideration to the claims and peculiarities of other branches of the Church. He now, for the first time, had a fair opportunity to observe the genius and working of Presbyterianism under its better auspices; and he found its worship congenial to his principles, and desired to know more of it
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 11: McDowell. (search)
ted the strategic importance; and that, if successful, it would as effectually neutralize the Federal forces on the Rappahannock, through the fears excited for Washington City, and thus assure the left flank of the army protecting Richmond against an assault from the direction of Fredericksburg. General Ewell was accordingly withdrawn from the Rappahannock towards Gordonsville, and then, towards the eastern outlet of Swift Run Gap. He brought with him three brigades, those of Brigadier-Generals R. Taylor, Trimble, and Elzey, with two regiments of cavalry, commanded by Colonel Th. S. Munford, and Lieutenant-Colonel Flournoy, with an adequate supply of field artillery. The whole formed an aggregate of about 8,000 men, in an admirable state of efficiency. The afternoon of April 30th, General Ewell entered Swift Run Gap, and took the position which General Jackson had just left to march towards Staunton. General Banks had been deceived by feints of an attack in force in the directi
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 12: Winchester. (search)
ket. He there met the fine brigade of General Richard Taylor, which had marched from Elk Run valleyell's division, which included the brigades of Taylor, Trimble, Elzey, and Stewart, and the cavalry regiment and the battalion of Major Wheat from Taylor's brigade, under the command of General Stewarith impetuosity; while General Jackson ordered Taylor's Louisiana brigade to support them by a movem Captain Poague. Next followed the brigade of Taylor, and the remainder of the infantry. Colonel A arrested their escape on that side; while General Taylor throwing his front regiment into line, advrtillery, and a supporting infantry force from Taylor's brigade, was sent in pursuit. But a few momretreat through his forces, immediately formed Taylor's brigade south of the village, and advanced ileft. He now sent for the fine brigade of General Taylor, which was at the head of the column of re On the West, the long and glittering lines of Taylor, after one thundering discharge, were sweeping
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 13: Port Republic. (search)
he sent back to Ewell the Louisiana brigade of Taylor, which had been moved to his support during thagainst Shields. The Louisiana brigade of General Taylor came next, and as soon as they had passed eneral Jackson led the brigades of Winder and Taylor against the Federalists, he found their main a its right by one of the regiments of Brigadier-General Taylor, and on its left by the 52nd and 31stemy's guns above Lewiston. The brigade of General Taylor was also sent to the right, by a detour tht them off from retreat. But the regiments of Taylor, nothing daunted, charged the Federal battery,saving diversion had been made. The attack of Taylor upon their left had silenced their artillery fnnon-shot. But it is time to return to General Taylor, who was left in possession of the Federal Virginia regiment from the Stonewall Brigade, Taylor's attack was renewed. Twice more was the conth the Federalists must have all retreated, General Taylor would have been nearer than they; while he[1 more...]
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