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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee and Grant in the Wilderness. (search)
ied, and was also anxious lest they would get back to Mine run, ten miles in rear of where the Wilderness battle was fought. Having fought two days, General Grant left General Lee's front in the night of the 7th, and moved off by his left flank, and not in the direction proposed. About nine A. M. on the 5th of May, Generals Grant and Meade rode up to the old Wilderness tavern; this was the first appearance of the former in what is called the Wilderness by citizens of Orange and Spottsylvania counties, Virginia. He was, personally, wholly ignorant of this section of Virginia, with its peculiar features. That he was not familiar with its topography, the following extract from his official report of this battle will show: Early on the 5th, the advance, the Fifth Corps, Major General G. K. Warren commanding, met the enemy outside his intrenchments near Mine run. And after giving details of the battle, says: On-the morning of the 7th, reconnoissances showed that the enemy had falle
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 39 (search)
Ransom finds himself merely an instrument in the hands of those who do not know how to use him skillfully. The enemy is said to have made a bridge across the James River, either to come on the north side, or to enable the raiders to reach them. They are also planting torpedoes, for our iron rams. They are not yet ready. Gen. Lee is prosecuting the defensive policy effectively. Couriers to the press, considered quite reliable, give some details of a most terrific battle in Spottsylvania County day before yesterday, 12th inst. Our men (with extra muskets) fought behind their breastworks. The host of assailants came on, stimulated by whisky rations, ten deep, and fearful was the slaughter. Their loss is estimated at 20,000; ours, 2000. The enemy were still in front. Grant says he will not recross the Rappahannock as long as he has a man left. Lee seems determined to kill his last man. A great deal of time is said to have been consumed in cabinet council, making selec
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 17: between Gettysburg and the Wilderness (search)
mber of moves against their great Confederate opponent. Apropos of the time and the region in which the operations just commented upon occurred,--being the great battlefield of central Virginia, threshed over for three years by the iron flail of war,--Billy sends me what he very justly terms the most pathetic and harrowing incident of my service in the Army of Northern Virginia. I give it substantially in his own words: One day while we were encamped in the Poison Fields of Spottsylvania County, Tom Armistead and I were summoned to Captain McCarthy's quarters. We found him talking to a woman very poorly but cleanly dressed, who seemed in bitter distress. The captain ordered us to go with the woman and bury her child. We went with her to her home, a small house with but two rooms. There we found her mother, an aged woman, and the child, a boy of ten, who had just died of a most virulent case of diphtheria. The father, a soldier in some Virginia regiment, was of course ab
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
g Campaign, 238, 241, 258, 287, 290, 309-22. Pettigrew, James Johnston, 209 Philadelphia, Pa., 209 Pickett, George Edward, 192, 272, 274, 311 Pioneer troops, 184-87, 210, 219, 276, 301 Point Lookout, Md., 18 Poison Fields, Spotsylvania County, Va., 229-30. Port Republic, 245 Presbyterians, 25, 139, 160, 318 Preston, William Ballard, 31-32. Price, Sterling, 117 Prisoners of war, Federal, 57-58, 80-81, 174-75, 212-14, 240, 255-56, 280, 294 Promotion on the field, 336n Historical Society Papers, 286 Spotswood Hotel, Richmond, Va., 45 Spotsylvania, Va.: battle of, 144-45, 156, 241, 248-69, 291, 305; Bloody Angle at, 262-64, 287, 305-306, 342; brick kiln at, 260-61; earthworks at, 288-90, 347 Spotsylvania County, Va., Poison Fields in, 229-31. Stanton, Edwin McMasters, 354 Staunton Artillery (Va.), 196-97. Stevens, Thaddeus, 26, 29 Stiles, Benjamin Edward, 78, 124, 136- 37, 282-83. Stiles, Eugene West, 39, 41, 241, 249-50. Stiles, Joseph Cl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Brigadier-General Perry of battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
Report of Brigadier-General Perry of battle of Chancellorsville. [From original Ms.] Headquarters Perry's brigade, May 9, 1863. To Major Thomas S. Mills, A. A. G.: Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command, consisting of the Second and Eighth Florida regiments, in the recent engagements in Spotsylvania county: On the evening of the 29th of April, in compliance with orders from division headquarters; I moved my comrnand to the heights in front of Falmouth, and throwing my pickets out to the river bank, remained in line of battle until about 11 o'clock on the morning of the 1st of May, when, in obedience to orders from Major-General Anderson, I moved with my command up the Plank road, and into the Old Turnpike road. I advanced up this road until I came to our line of battle, held by Major-General McLaws' on the right. I then received an order from Major-General Mc-Laws' to form my brigade on the right of Brigadier-General
urt-House, moved down the plank road, and it all at once became evident that a battle would be fought somewhere betwen Orange Court-House and Fredericksburgh, and most probably in the vicinity of the Chancellorsville battle-ground. On Friday, about ten o'clock, skirmishers from Johnson's division, which was the head of Ewell's column, came up with the enemy, who were advancing up the road leading from the Fredericksburgh turnpike to Raccoon Ford, about a mile below Bartley's Mill, in Spotsylvania County, some eighteen miles below Orange Court-House, and some twenty-two miles above Fredericksburgh, and about twelve miles above the Chancellorsville battle-ground. The Louisiana brigade, under General Halford, first became engaged, and afterward the whole division of General E. Johnson, consisting of the Stonewall brigade, under General Walker, General G. H. Stuart's brigade, and General G. M. Jones's brigade, took part in the battle. The force of the enemy engaged consisted of Frenc
y was to be made on the city. But you must have seen by the papers how treachery foiled its accomplishment. At dark, Kill was in the saddle, and the column moved across the Rapidan, at Ely's Ford, where we captured the picket post of a captain and fourteen men. We were now within their lines, and great caution was necessary; but we marched all night, no rest, for we had to get to the rear of Lee's forces. Monday, A. M., we reached Beaver Dam and cut the telegraph. We were now in Spottsylvania County, and created consternation among the inhabitants. On coming to the railroad, parties were detached up and down the line to demolish it, blow up bridges, etc. The air became full of smoke as we neared Beaver Dam Station, which was all in flames, with a train of cars, hundreds of cords of wood, and every thing of value, consigned to the flames. This day we halted and slept for an hour or so, and then continued our march. The roads were very rough. One of my wagons upset in a creek
their valuable and efficient services during all the week's operations. I am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, A. R. Wright. Brigadier-General, commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Perry. headquarters Perry's brigade, May 9, 1863. To Major Thomas S. Mills, A. A. General: Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command, consisting of the Second and Eighth Florida regiments, in the recent engagements in Spottsylvania county: On the evening of the twenty-ninth of April, in compliance with orders from division headquarters, I moved my command to the heights in front of Falmouth, and throwing my pickets out to the river bank, remained in line of battle until about eleven o'clock on the morning of the first of May, when, in obedience to orders from Major-General Anderson, I moved with my command up the plank road, and into the old turnpike road. I advanced up this road until I came to our line of battle,
on had, of course, to be made to hold the boats in position against strong currents in streams to be crossed, by anchors or guy-lines to the shore. When the campaign opened in 1864, the engineer troops attached to the Army of Northern Virginia, which was then at Orange Court House, were used first as infantry to guard the depot of supplies at Guiney's Station, and afterward to support a cavalry Brigade which held the Telegraph road, on the extreme right of General Lee's position in Spotsylvania County, where it crossed the Ny, one of the four streams which form the Mattapony River. At this point earthworks were constructed, and the position was held until after the battle of Spotsylvania Court House, when it was turned by the flank movement of General Grant; and General Lee retired to the line of the North Anna River. During General Grant's demonstration against Richmond, the engineer troops were used to strengthen the works which withstood his attacks at Cold Harbor; but antic
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maury, Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 (search)
Maury, Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 Scientist; born in Spottsylvania county, Va., June 14, 1806; entered the navy as midshipman in 1825, and while circumnavigating the globe began his treatise on Navigation. An accident in 1839 made him a permanent cripple, and he was placed in charge of the Hydrographic Office at Washington. On its union with the Naval Observatory, in 1844, he became its superintendent. He made extensive researches concerning the physical geography of the sea, and published an interesting work on the subject. He also made extensive investigations regarding the Gulf Stream. In 1861 he resigned his appointments from the government and espoused the cause of the Confederacy. In 1871 he was made president of the University of Alabama. His scientific works gained for him distinguished honors from foreign governments and many learned societies. He died in Lexington, Va., Feb. 1, 1873.
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