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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 52 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long). You can also browse the collection for Euphrates or search for Euphrates in all documents.

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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 3 (search)
to a strict examination; but you have undertaken it at hazard and with a cold desire. Thus some persons having seen a philosopher and having heard one speak like EuphratesIn place of Euphrates the Encheiridion 29 had in the text 'Socrates,' which name the recent editors of the Encheiridion altered to 'Euphrates,' and correctly. TheEuphrates the Encheiridion 29 had in the text 'Socrates,' which name the recent editors of the Encheiridion altered to 'Euphrates,' and correctly. The younger Pliny (i. Ep. 10) speaks in high terms of the merits and attractive eloquence of this Syrian philosopher Euphrates, who is mentioned by M. Antoninus (x. 31) and by others.— and yet who can speak like him?—wish to be philosophers themselves. Man, consider first what the matter is (which you pro- pose to do), then your own nEuphrates,' and correctly. The younger Pliny (i. Ep. 10) speaks in high terms of the merits and attractive eloquence of this Syrian philosopher Euphrates, who is mentioned by M. Antoninus (x. 31) and by others.— and yet who can speak like him?—wish to be philosophers themselves. Man, consider first what the matter is (which you pro- pose to do), then your own nature also, what it is able to bear. If you are a wrestler, look at your shoulders, your thighs, your loins: for different men are naturally formed for different things. Do you think that, if you do (what you are doing daily), you can be a philosopher? Do you think that you can eat as you do now, drink as you do now, and in the s