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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
of utter inability to provide for the prisoners follows immediately my statement of the monthly mortality at Andersonville. I referred more to medicine than to food, though I did not intend entirely to exclude the latter. But does not S. know that there were others besides the prisoners at Andersonville, who were to be cared for? We had a large army in the field. We had our own hospitals to supply. Our armies everywhere were drawing from Georgia. It was because the stores at Americus, Albany and elsewhere were not sufficient to supply both prisoners and our own soldiers, that I made the propositions to the Federal authorities which I have heretofore mentioned. S. also denies that the mortality at Andersonville was greater after I proposed to deliver the Federal prisoners, without requiring their equivalents, than it was before. It is the truth, however much S. may deny it. Of course I speak of the percentage of mortality, and not the aggregate. After August there were few
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 3 (search)
olling so frequently mentioned, was Dr. Bolling A. Pope, a stepson of my mother's youngest sister, Mrs. Alexander Pope, of Washington, Ga., the Aunt Cornelia spoken of in a later chapter. He was in Berlin when the war began, where he had spent several years preparing himself as a specialist in diseases of the eye and ear, but returned when hostilities began, and was assigned to duty as a surgeon. The Tallassee Plantation to which reference is made, was an estate owned by my father near Albany, Ga., where the family were in the habit of spending the winters, until he sold it and transferred his principal planting interests to the Yazoo Delta in Mississippi. Mt. Enon was a little log church where services were held by a refugee Baptist minister, and, being the only place of worship in the neighborhood, was attended by people of all denominations. The different homes and families mentioned were those of well-known planters in that section, or of refugee friends who had temporarily t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
act. On the 28th of April, General Upton was ordered, with a detachment of his division, to proceed by rail to Augusta, while the rest of the division, under General Winslow, was ordered to march by the most direct route to Atlanta, a regiment under Colonel Eggleston having been sent by rail to that place immediately after the receipt of the telegram just mentioned from General Sherman. General E. M. McCook, with a detachment of seven hundred men, was directed to proceed by rail to. Albany, Georgia, and march thence by the most direct route to Tallahassee, Florida, while General Croxton, with the remainder of this division, was held at Macon, with orders issued subsequently to watch the line of the Ocmulgee river from the mouth of Yellow creek to Macon. General Minty, commanding the Second Division--general Long having been wounded at Selma — was directed, about the same time, to send detachments to Cuthbert and Eufaula, and to watch the line of the Ocmulgee, from the right of th
homasville is about as fine as can be found in Georgia. The soil is good, and the climate mild enough for figs to grow out of doors. We were left here about a week when all who could walk were made to march sixty miles across the country to Albany. I do not know what became of the sick who could not walk. We never saw them any more. On this march, Tom B , my old chum of the swamps, slipped his guard and went to a farm-house and got a square meal, and then told what manner of man he was, and let the old citizen arrest him and bring him back. At Albany we were crowded in and around the depot. Many of the citizens came down to see us and talk with us. The guard was kind, and allowed us to talk with them. Some were pleasant and agreeable, and others were ill-natured and quarrelsome. Some wanted to know what Youalls want to fight we-uns for. Some asked us to sing a song, and we gave them John Brown, with a chorus of three or four thousand voices. That song always touche
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 15.100 (search)
He was instructed not to engage the enemy, but, if pressed, to fall back to the fortifications of East Macon; or, if necessary, toward the south in the direction already taken by Wheeler's cavalry. Contrary to my instructions the militia became engaged about one mile beyond Griswoldville, and were badly cut up. They lost 51 killed and 472 wounded, but they remained in close contact with the enemy until dark. By authority of General Taylor I then withdrew them to Macon and moved by rail to Albany, thence across the country to Thomasville, and from the latter point by rail to Savannah. About one thousand of the command arrived at the latter place at 2 A. M. on the 30th of November. Immediately upon the arrival of the leading train in Savannah, before I had left my seat in the car, an officer of Hardee's staff handed me two orders. The first, dated 10 P. M., November 29th, read: Lieutenant-General Hardee directs that you will proceed at once with the first two trains of your t
ntucky cavalry, numbering about five hundred men, proceeded from Macon, Georgia, en route for Tallahassee, Florida, on the fifth day of May, 1865, for the purpose of receiving the surrender of troops in the State of Florida, going by rail to Albany, Georgia, a distance of one hundred miles. Here several hundred prisoners were paroled and a large amount of quartermaster, commissary, ordinance, and naval stores, were received from the rebel authorities, Marched from Albany on the eighth insumber paroled. where paroled. when paroled.       1865. Provost Marshal Cavalry Corps, M. D. M. 14,985 Macon, Ga. April and May. Colonel Eggleston 10,000 Atlanta, Ga. May. An estimate; no report received up to date.Colonel Cooper 5,000 Albany, Ga. May. Major Williams 957 Milledgeville, Ga. May. Captain Walden 226 Forsyth, Ga. May. Captain Lambson 3,700 Columbus, Ga. May. Captain Abrahams 5,026 Washington, Ga. May. Captain Gates 1,247 Hawkinsville, Ga. May. General Upton 6,315 Augu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the Battalion of the Georgia Military Institute Cadets (search)
c, Forsyth, Ga. Traylor, R. B., Harris county, Ga. Chipley, Ga. Ulmer——, Vance,——. *Villard, W. D., South Carolina. Died in Atlanta, Ga., 1897. Walton, Taylor, Lumpkin, Ga., Texas. Waters, J. C., Marietta, Ga. Wesson, M., Albany, Ga. Wesson, T., Albany, Ga. Wilcox,—— Williams, O. S., Hamilton, Harris county, Ga. Williams, T. *Wright, B. F., Covington, Ga. Wright, C. *Young, Thomas, Valdosta, Ga. Casualties in the Battalion. Cadet Corporal AndersoAlbany, Ga. Wilcox,—— Williams, O. S., Hamilton, Harris county, Ga. Williams, T. *Wright, B. F., Covington, Ga. Wright, C. *Young, Thomas, Valdosta, Ga. Casualties in the Battalion. Cadet Corporal Anderson, of Greenville, S. C., was wounded in knee during siege of Atlanta, and died August 11, 1864, two days later, in hospital. Cadet F. E. Courvoisier, of Savannah, Ga., was wounded in hip in August, 1864, siege of Atlanta. He recovered. Died in Port Royal, S. C., 1896. Cadet A. H. Alexander, of Forsyth, Ga., was killed instantly by a solid ball from a six-pounder cannon, passing entirely through his body, in siege of Atlanta, August 12, 1864. Cadet A. T. Luckie painfully woun
Albany, Baker County, Georgia a town of 1,618* pop., on Flint River. It is an important shipping point for cotton, steamboats connecting it with the Gulf of Mexico.
Fire --The town of Albany, Georgia, was visited by a destructive fire on the 20th inst., and the Express Office at that point, the Hotel, Livery Stable, and other buildings, were burned.
Bloody Encounter in Albany, Ga. --On Saturday, the 26th ult., a shooting affray occurred at Byington's Hotel, Albany, Ga., between Thomas Johnson and Captain Wimberley, which, after a couple of exchanges of shots, resulted in the death of Mr. Johnson and the wounding of Captain Wimberley.--Johnson, on being shot, acknowledged that he was altogether in fault, and shook hands with his antagonist. Bloody Encounter in Albany, Ga. --On Saturday, the 26th ult., a shooting affray occurred at Byington's Hotel, Albany, Ga., between Thomas Johnson and Captain Wimberley, which, after a couple of exchanges of shots, resulted in the death of Mr. Johnson and the wounding of Captain Wimberley.--Johnson, on being shot, acknowledged that he was altogether in fault, and shook hands with his antagonist.
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