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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Condition of the Army-rebuilding the Railroad- General Burnside's situation-orders for battle-plans for the attack-hooker's position- Sherman's movements (search)
And again later in the day, indicating my plans for his relief, as follows: Your dispatch and Dana's just received. Being there, you can tell better how to resist Longstreet's attack than I can direct. With your showing you had better give up Kingston at the last moment and save the most productive part of your possessions. Every arrangement is now made to throw Sherman's force across the river, just at and below the mouth of Chickamauga Creek, as soon as it arrives. Thomas will attack on hy reach there on the 16th. This will bring it to the 19th as the earliest day for making the combined movement as desired. Inform me if you think you can sustain yourself until this time. I can hardly conceive of the enemy breaking through at Kingston and pushing for Kentucky. If they should, however, a new problem would be left for solution. Thomas has ordered a division of cavalry to the vicinity of Sparta. I will ascertain if they have started, and inform you. It will be entirely out of
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Movement by the left flank-battle of North Anna-an incident of the March-moving on Richmond-South of the Pamunkey-position of the National Army (search)
mies besieging. Lee had been reinforced, and was being reinforced, largely. About this time the very troops whose coming I had predicted, had arrived or were coming in. Pickett with a full division from Richmond was up; Hoke from North Carolina had come with a brigade; and Breckinridge was there: in all probably not less than fifteen thousand men. But he did not attempt to drive us from the field. On the 22d or 23d I received dispatches from Washington saying that Sherman had taken Kingston, crossed the Etowah River and was advancing into Georgia. I was seated at the time on the porch of a fine plantation house waiting for Burnside's corps to pass. Meade and his staff, besides my own staff, were with me. The lady of the house, a Mrs. Tyler, and an elderly lady, were present. Burnside seeing us, came up on the porch, his big spurs and saber rattling as he walked. He touched his hat politely to the ladies, and remarked that he supposed they had never seen so many live Yan
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 33: the East Tennessee campaign. (search)
en ordered to have vedettes along the river from Loudon to some distance below Kingston, where a considerable body of Union troops occupied the north bank. He was or together, making the Tennessee River, which flows from the confluence west to Kingston, where it resumes its general flow southwest. The Holston rises in the mountaoxville, as far as Campbell Station, about seventeen miles, where it joins the Kingston road, passes a gap, and unites with the wagon-road that runs with the railroade Campbell Station Pass to occupy the junction of his line of retreat with the Kingston road and the road upon which we were marching, and was well on the march with during the night. Hart's cavalry brigade that was left in observation near Kingston had been called up, and with McLaws's division advanced on the roads to Campbeonfederates, when occupied by them years before, called Fort Loudon, above the Kingston road, and about a thousand yards in front of the college. East from that poin
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 34: Besieging Knoxville. (search)
r consulting his officers, General McLaws reported that they preferred to have daylight for their work. On the 23d reports came of a large force of the enemy at Kingston advancing. General Wheeler was sent with his main force of cavalry to look after them. He engaged the enemy on the 24th, and after a skirmish withdrew. Soon af Major-General Martin, he rode to find his commander. General Martin brought the brigades back and resumed position on our left. Colonel Hart, who was left at Kingston with his brigade, reported that there were but three regiments of cavalry and a field battery, that engaged General Wheeler on the 24th. On the night of theth a loss of some prisoners and a number of killed and wounded. General Wofford's loss was five wounded, two mortally. Our cavalry, except a brigade left at Kingston, resumed its position on the left of our line on the 26th. On the 23d a telegram came from General Bragg to say that the enemy had moved out and attacked his tr
loss of four killed and several wounded; the Home Guard sustaining no loss whatever. To-day the rebels crossed the Cumberland Mountains, committing many depredations on their route, and made their way to Jacksboro, Tenn. Great excitement existed at Chambersburgh, Pa., it having been reported that the rebels were in Mercersburgh, and on their march for the former place.--The One Hundred and Fifty-sixth regiment of New York volunteers, under the corn mand of Colonel Erastus Cooke, left Kingston for the seat of war.--Lieutenant Johnson, of the Seventeenth regiment of Kentucky, was dismissed the service of the United States.--A fight took place near Lebanon, Tenn., between a party of National cavalry, under the command of Kennett and Wolford, and the rebels under Morgan, resulting in the defeat of the latter with a loss of seven killed and one hundred and twenty-five captured.-At Newbern, N. C., the National pickets and a small advance force were driven in by a large body of rebels,
September 2. Kingston, Tenn., was occupied by a portion of General Burnside's army, under the command of General Minty.--the gunboats Satellite and Reliance, which were captured by the rebels on the twenty-second of August,, were destroyed by the Union forces under the command of General Kilpatrick, at Port Conway, Va.--the guerrilla Hughes, with one hundred rebels, appeared in Burksville, Ky. A joint committee of the Alabama Legislature reported a resolution in favor of the proposition to employ slaves in the military service of the confederate States, which proposition was favored by many of the presses of Mississippi and Alabama. After discussion in the Alabama House, the resolution was adopted by a vote of sixty-eight yeas to twelve nays, after striking out the words military before service, and soldiers at the end of the resolution. The resolution was amended and reads as follows: That it is the duty of Congress to provide by law for the employment in the ser
September 4. Knoxville, Tenn., was occupied by the National forces under Major-General Burnside. The East-Tennesseeans were so glad to see the Union soldiers that they cooked every thing they had, and gave it to them freely, not asking pay, and apparently not thinking of it. Women stood by the roadside with pails of water, and displayed Union flags. The wonder was, where all the Stars and Stripes came from. Knoxville was radiant with flags. At a point on the road from Kingston to Knoxville sixty women and girls stood by the road-side waving Union flags and shouting: Hurrah for the Union. Old ladies rushed out of their houses, and wanted to see General Burnside and shake hands with him, and cried: Welcome, welcome, General Burnside! welcome to East-Tennessee! --(Doc. 168.) The women of Mobile, Ala., rendered desperate by their sufferings, met in large numbers on the Spring Hill road, with banners on which were printed such devices as Bread or blood, on one side, and
November 18. The firing on Fort Sumter from the National batteries continued. A rebel mortar battery on Sullivan's Island shelled Gregg and the Cummings Point defences all day.--General Longstreet made an attack upon the Union outposts, on the Kingston road, near Knoxville, Tenn., and compelled General Sanders, in command of the forces there, to fall back to the town.--Doc. 19. General Averill arrived at New Creek, Va. At or near Covington he encountered and dispersed a portion of Imboden's command on their way to reenforce Echols, and captured twenty-five prisoners in the skirmish. The cavalry belonging to the Union forces under the command of Brigadier-General J. C. Sullivan, sent out from Harper's Ferry, Va., returned this day, having been up the Valley to near New Market, fighting Gilmore's and White's commands at Mount Jackson, bringing in twenty-seven prisoners, two commissioned officers, ninety head of cattle, three four-horse teams, besides thirty tents and al
January 6. Major General Foster, from his headquarters at Knoxville, issued the following order: All able-bodied colored men, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, within our lines, except those employed in the several staff departments, officers' servants, and those servants of loyal citizens who prefer remaining with their masters, will be sent forthwith to Knoxville, Loudon, or Kingston, Tennessee, to be enrolled under the direction of Brigadier-General Davis Tillson, Chief of Artillery, with a view to the formation of a regiment of artillery, to be composed of troops of African descent. By orders from General Foster, Brigadier-General O. B. Wilcox was assigned to the command of the district of Clinch, including the region between the Cumberland and Clinch Mountains, and extending from Big Creek Gap on the west, to the eastern line of the State of Tennessee, on the east.
Its top is undulating, or rough, covered with timber, soil comparatively barren, and in dry seasons scantily supplied with water. Its south-eastern slope, above Chattanooga, for many miles, is precipitous, rough, and difficult all the way up to Kingston. The valley between the foot of this slope and the river seldom exceeds four or five miles in width, and, with the exception of a narrow border along the banks, is undulating or hilly. The Sequatchie Valley is along the river of that name, ah two brigades from McMinnville, the third being left in garrison there, by the most practicable route to Pikeville, the head of Sequatchie Valley. Colonel Minty's cavalry to move, on the left, by Sparta, to drive back Debrel's cavalry toward Kingston, where the enemy's mounted troops, under Forrest, were concentrated, and then, covering the left flank of Van Cleve's column, to proceed to Pikeville. The Fourteenth army corps, Major-General George H. Thomas commanding, moved as follows:
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