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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
ful to the task which had been assigned to him long before, was falling, to the northward, upon Abingdon, in order to guard the entrance into Virginia. Frazer had received orders to join him, but havoopers sent out to meet Frazer encountered Shackelford, who drove them back in the direction of Abingdon. Instead of the expected help, the Federals appeared on the southern road. When the Confeders of the upper Kanawha, where we have left him, had come to reinforce Jones between Bristol and Abingdon. In another direction, Burnside, as soon as he had arrived at Knoxville, had sent out a large detachment of infantry toward Abingdon to threaten its salt-works and destroy the railway as far as possible. The road being clear, four hundred Federals got on a train and proceeded as far as Cartero advance against Jones and Jackson, to drive them into Virginia, and push on perhaps as far as Abingdon. But this last movement was hardly accomplished when a cry of alarm succeeded to the complacen
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
urnside urged his infantry no farther. But Shackelford closely pursued Williams, and, crossing the Watauga, attacked Ransom at Blountsville on the 14th. After a feeble resistance the Confederates fell back on the station named Union or Zollicoffer, which they had fortified since its destruction in the previous winter by the Federal cavalry. They promptly abandoned it, with a considerable amount of rolling stock, and the Unionists pushed on into Virginia. While Ransom was falling back on Abingdon, Shackelford was at last retracing his steps, systematically destroying all the railway-line beyond Jonesborough. The limits of the occupation were extended as far as that town, where Shackelford left a portion of his force. Willcox with a mixed division was placed in reserve at Greenville, and he despatched two regiments, under Colonel Garrard, to hold at Rogersville the Kingsport and Knoxville road. The two routes which led into Southern Virginia were thus closed. On the 16th the pas