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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
rteenth passed beyond our extreme left. June 3 and 4, nothing of consequence, excepting that I thinned and extended my lines so as to cover the ground occupied by the Twenty-third Corps, and afterward by Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieving those troops in order to prolong our lines to the left. The result of these movements was to cause the enemy to abandon his lines on the night of June 4. June 5, the command rested. June 6, marched toward Acworth, crossing Allatoona Creek, and massed the command near Dr. Peters' house, on the Acworth and Sandtown road, about two miles from Acworth, which was already in possession of our troops. June 7, 8, and 9, all that was done by the entire army was establishing the depots at Allatoona, rebuilding the bridge across the Etowah, and bringing up supplies. June 10, movements were resumed. The Fourth Corps was directed to follow the Fourteenth along the direct Miarietta road. The Fourteenth Corps having passed to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
he 5th of June, when the enemy disappeared from the (our) front, I remained in my advanced position, skirmishing hotly and continually with him day and night; in fact the affair more resembled a continuous battle than a skirmish. On the 6th of June I was ordered by you to cover with my brigade the movement of the corps hospitals, and in compliance bivouacked that night near Brown's Mill creek. On the 8th, the movement of the hospitals being completed, my command joined the division at Allatoona Creek, near Acworth, bringing in 8 prisoners. One of them, a cavalry scout, well mounted and armed, was captured by the commissary sergeant of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, while he (the sergeant) was bathing, naked and unarmed. On the 11th I was placed in reserve, and moved with my command to a point about three and a half miles west, northwest from Kenesaw Mountain, and so remained the 12th and 13th, each day in line of battle, to support the Second Brigade, should it become necessary. On t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 176 (search)
e on Pumpkin Vine Creek at 4 p. m., and threw up works during the night. 27th, engaged by rebel batteries all day. 28th, engaged in same position all day. 29th, engaged at same place all day. 30th, engaged all day. 31st, engaged all day. June 1, engaged all day. June 2, engaged a part of the day; was relieved in the evening and moved two and a half miles to the left and went into camp, where we remained during the 3d, 4th, and 5th. June 6, moved again, passing through Big Shanty to Allatoona Creek, where we camped. 7th, camped in line and threw up works. 8th and 9th, remained in camp. 10th, marched again toward Kenesaw Mountain and camped. 11th, went into position three miles from Kenesaw Mountain. 12th and 13th, in position but not engaged. 14th, engaged a part of the day. 15th, moved out toward Kenesaw and camped. 16th and 17th, battery lightly engaged. 18th, went into camp. 19th, remained in camp all day. 20th, went into position under fire near east end of Kenesaw Mou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
nd secure possession of the east end of Allatoona Pass and the bridge over Allatoona Creek, while General Garrard's cavalry will move via Burnt Hickory and Richland Burnt Church, ready to move next day to Acworth, leaving his wagons behind Allatoona Creek; that General Thomas will refuse his right behind the creek on which Brown's Mill is located, and will prepare to move across Allatoona Creek to a point of the railroad in front of Acworth, say Big Shanty; General Schofield to strengthen hy and the one leading south to the east of Lost Mountain, right resting on Allatoona Creek. The Fourteenth Corps to follow the Twentieth, and to take up a position rtillery and trains. The main corps train to move via Burnt Church across Allatoona Creek, under direction of Colonel Hayes, chief quartermaster. Ammunition trainsd. After moving a short distance on the Allatoona road, and after crossing Allatoona Creek, General Wood's division crossed through the fields to the left, and moved
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
temporarily abandoned, came back to officers and men; necessary supplies, at the hands of smiling quartermasters and commissaries, now found us. The dead were buried, the sick and wounded were made more comfortable, and everybody got his mail and wrote letters. Meanwhile Sherman and his army commanders were. endeavoring to find the location of their enemy. Johnston was holding the region south of the Etowah, including the pass of Allatoona, and extended his army along the ridge of Allatoona Creek toward the south-west. He was picketing a parallel ridge in front of his line, along another creek, the Pumpkin Vine. This is substantially where we found this able and careful commander; but he pushed a little to the left and forward as we came on, till Hardee was at Dallas and Hood at New Hope Church. Our march was resumed on the morning of the 24th of May, Thomas crossing on his own pontoons south of Kingston; Hooker, contrary to the plan, went in advance of Schofield's column ove
in in the attack successively from right to left. On the 29th (May), Lieutenant General Hood, finding the Federal left covered by a division which had entrenched itself in the night, thought it inexpedient to attack; so reported and asked for instructions. As the resulting delay made the attack inexpedient, even had it not been so before by preventing surprise upon which success in a great measure depended, he was recalled. The enemy, on the 28th, had extended his left flank across Allatoona creek and along the Ackworth road. At my own suggestion Geheral Johnston directed me to move my corps and strike the enemy's left. Upon arriving the next morning and while moving to accomplish this, I found that the enemy had retired his flank a mile and strongly fortified it. The opportunity having thus passed by the act of the enemy and not by my delay, I reported the fact to General Johnston, deeming it best that the attack should not be made, and the instructions to me were countermande
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
e was, at 1 P. M., shot across the face, the ball cutting his ear, which stunned him, but he continued to encourage his men and to give orders. The enemy (about 1.30 P. M.) made a last and desperate effort to carry one of the redoubts, but was badly cut to pieces by the artillery and infantry fire from the other, when he began to draw off, leaving his dead and wounded on the ground. Before finally withdrawing, General French converged a heavy fire of his cannon on the block-house at Allatoona Creek, about two miles from the depot, set it on fire, and captured its garrison, consisting of four officers and eighty-five men. By 4 P. M. he was in full retreat south, on the Dallas road, and got by before the head of General Cox's column had reached it; still several ambulances and stragglers were picked up by this command on that road. General Corse reported two hundred and thirty-one rebel dead, four hundred and eleven prisoners, three regimental colors, and eight hundred muskets capt
seven A. M., and marched to Cartersville, eleven miles, remaining there during the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth. November thirteenth, marched at daylight to Ackworth, thirteen miles, destroying the railroad from the Etowah River to Allatoona Creek, eight miles. November fourteenth, marched at daylight, passing to the right of Kenesaw Mountains, and bivouacked at Nickojack Creek, twenty miles. November fifteenth, moved at daylight to Atlanta, (12) twelve miles. November sixtee M. same day, at Kingston, where it remained until November twelfth, when the march toward Atlanta was begun, encamping first night three miles from Etowah River. November thirteenth, passed through Allatoona Gap, destroyed the railroad from Allatoona Creek to a point one mile beyond Ackworth, and went into camp at Big Shanty. November fourteenth, division crossed the Chattahoochee River. November fifteenth, marched through and camped near the city of Atlanta. November sixteenth, passed thr
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 31: battle of Pickett's Mill (search)
eft en route touching the Marietta wagon road. Every foot of his way was contested by skirmishing Confederates, but now, slowly and steadily, without general battle, the enemy was forced back to a partially new intrenched position, south of Allatoona Creek, back as far as the forks of the Dallas-Ackworth road. Here, charging across the creek in a terrific thunderstorm, Schofield's men forced their way close up to the Confederate works. They were as near to them as 250 yards, tenaciously holdanied by rifle firing and cannonading. These works, some of them detached, connected Johnston's principal line from Lost Mountain with Pine Top. Schofield, about the same time, drove a line of skirmishers away from a small bare hill near Allatoona Creek, placed his artillery upon it, and thence worked a cross fire into the enemy's intrenchments, driving Johnston's men, thus newly exposed in flank, back to near Gilgal Church. We were all along so close to our enemy that the constant skirmis
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
In the meantime Gen. W. H. Jackson, commanding the cavalry on the other wing, observed that the Federal troops were still moving to their right, and were crossing the Etowah near Stilesboro. Information from Wheeler and Jackson given Johnston near the pass of Allatoona, satisfied him that Sherman was making a detour toward Dallas, and he promptly took advantage of two strong lines extending thence toward Dallas, and facing nearly northwest. One of these lines capable of defense was on Allatoona creek, the front line on Pumpkin Vine creek, running southwest from the vicinity of Allatoona. The Federal forces crossed the, Etowah at Rome and other points between there and Stilesboro, and, to meet this movement, Johnston on the 23d sent Hardee's corps toward Dallas, Polk moving in the same direction on the left, and on the next day Hood followed Hardee. Hood's corps was placed with its center at New Hope church, Polk and Hardee between that corps and the highway to Atlanta from Dalla
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