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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
rth that since the capture of Fort Hatteras they had strengthened Fort Macon, obstructed the Neuse and Pamlico rivers, mounted seventeen heavy insulate New Berne from the surrounding country. The siege of Fort Macon. The next and last objective point of any importance in the new department of North Carolina was the capture of Fort Macon, an old-style, strong, stone, casemated work, mounting 67 guns, garrisoned by abowith one company of the 5th Rhode Island Battalion. The 21st, Fort Macon after its capture by the Union forces, showing effects of the bomd. Thus all the important positions around or in the vicinity of Fort Macon had fallen into the possession of the Union forces without contes and so ended, in a comparatively bloodless victory, the siege of Fort Macon, the combined losses of both sides being only 9 killed and 25 wouuns, a proposition was made to General Parke for the surrender of Fort Macon. During the bombardment a detachment of the Signal Corps unde
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.54 (search)
enemy fled to New Berne, burning the bridge behind them. Our troops rapidly pursued, but the fact that they had to cross the river in boats prevented them from capturing the main body of the enemy. As it was, large numbers of prisoners and munitions fell into our hands. In the meantime the naval vessels had worked their way up to the city and aided in the transportation of the troops across, and New Berne was occupied on the afternoon of the 14th. It still remained for us to reduce Fort Macon, Beaufort. To this work General Parke's brigade was ordered. The country between New Berne and Beaufort Colonel Zebulon B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina, 1862-5; at the battle of New Berne, in command of the 26th North Carolina regiment. From a photograph. was immediately occupied, and a passage by hand-car was made between the two places, all the rolling-stock having been run off the road. By the morning of the 11th of April regular siege operations had been begun by General Par
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
told me there was not a criticism made. The meeting consisted of General Scott, General Totten, General Meigs, Colonel T. W. Sherman, Captain H. G. Wright, of the Engineers, and Colonel Cullum, aide-de-camp to the general. Memoirs dated August 9th, September 2d and 3d, follow, giving a discussion of the blockade on the west coast of Florida, and to the border of Mexico. A memoir dated September 12th discusses a proposition submitted from the department in relation to the taking of Fort Macon, which closes as follows: We beg leave to observe that here, and in all our previous reports and memoirs, we have confined ourselves to the treatment of cases, more or less special or general, connected with; and tending to promote, the efficiency and activity of the blockade of the Southern shores. We have not entered upon the exclusive consideration of the great military expeditions alone; we have treated mixed expeditions compounded of military and naval operations, and requiring comb
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The War's Carnival of fraud. (search)
rience to lie in the archives of the government undisturbed, like a loathsome corpse in a dishonored grave. But a history of the Rebellion which should not embrace this chapter would be no history worthy of the name; and so, as no one can serve as my substitute, I comply with the editor's request. I passed at the front the first year of the war, joining the Burnside expedition at Annapolis, participating at the capture of Roanoke Island, the battle of Kewbern, the siege and capture of Fort Macon, the battles on the Rappahannock during Pope's retreat, and other military operations. Exposure to malaria finally disabled me with fever, and I was obliged to return home from Washington, where my horse stood ready saddled for a start the next morning with General Burnside to join Hooker with our Ninth Corps. I recovered after two months, and, while convalescent, was first intrusted with the responsible duties which occupied my whole attention subsequently until the close of the war, a
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 9: General view of the campaigns of 1862. (search)
Great Britain, to shake off his grasp. What, then, must have been the energy of the Southern character, as compared with the Spanish, or what the impotency of the Federal administration as compared with the French, to reduce the consequences of their invasion to so partial a limit, at the end of three years nf lavish expenditure and bloodshed? The opening of the campaign of 1862 found the Federalists firmly seated upon the coast of South Carolina at Beaufort, and of North Carolina at Fort Macon, Newberne, and Roanoke Island. On the eastern borders of Virginia, they occupied Fortress Monroe, and Newport News, all the lower peninsula between the James and York Rivers, and the mouth of the Rappahannock. Near the ancient towns of Williamsburg and York, General Magruder, with a few thousand men, held their superior numbers at bay: and his guns maintained a precarious command over the channels of the two rivers. Around Washington, swarmed the Grand Army of General McClellan, upon b
arly a month. By February 7, however, that and other serious difficulties were overcome, and on the following day the expedition captured Roanoke Island, and thus completely opened the whole interior water-system of Albemarle and Pamlico sounds to the easy approach of the Union fleet and forces. From Roanoke Island as a base, minor expeditions within a short period effected the destruction of the not very formidable fleet which the enemy had been able to organize, and the reduction of Fort Macon and the rebel defenses of Elizabeth City, New Berne, and other smaller places. An eventual advance upon Goldsboroa formed part of the original plan; but, before it could be executed, circumstances intervened effectually to thwart that object. While the gradual occupation of the North Carolina coast was going on, two other expeditions of a similar nature were making steady progress. One of them, under the direction of General Quincy A. Gillmore, carried on a remarkable siege operation
Anderson's communications are cut off; that Fort Moultrie has been completely repaired and the guns remounted; and that every thing is in readiness to open a fire on Major Anderson. New batteries are being erected around him by the secessionists.--N. Y. Times. In New York city an assembly of the people in the City Hall Park fire 100 guns in honor of Major Anderson. Five thousand citizens of Baltimore have signed a letter addressed to Governor Hicks, of Maryland, approving his course in refusing to convene the Legislature of that State. The list is headed by John P. Kennedy, Mr. Fillmore's Secretary of the Navy, and comprises the names of nine-tenths of the business men of the city. Calls for public meetings to sustain the Governor are now being issued all over the State.--Baltimore American. Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, dispatched troops to seize upon Fort Macon, at Beaufort, the forts at Wilmington, and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville.--Times, Jan. 3.
declared martial law over the counties of Elizabeth City, York, Warwick, Gloucester, and Matthews.--Norfolk Day Book, March 24. Three hundred privates and fifty-eight officers, the first detachment of prisoners taken at Pea Ridge, arrived at St. Louis, Mo. This day Gen. Parke's brigade of Gen. Burnside's division, took possession of Morehead City, N. C., finding it evacuated by the inhabitants. Lieut. Flagler, ordnance officer, and a member of Gen. Parke's staff, crossed over to Fort Macon, a distance of two miles across Rogue's Sound, with a flag of truce, and demanded a surrender. A considerable parley took place, in which the folly of the rebels attempting to hold out was set before them. The Fort was occupied by some five hundred secession troops, which were in command of Lieut. Smith. Lieut. Flagler assured them of the ample means at the disposal of the Nationals to reduce the Fort. and deprecated the sacrifice of life which it would occasion. Lieut. Smith persistin
w Madrid, Mo., accompanied by a large body of National trools.--New York World, April 16. Four companies of the Connecticut Eighth Regiment had a skirmish this day with a force of rebels of one hundred and fifty men that made a sortie from Fort Macon, the rebels driving in the Union pickets. After a sharp engagement the rebels were driven back to the Fort. Capt. Schaffer and one private of company H, of the Eighth Connecticut, were severely wounded. The rebels were seen to take four of their men into the Fort, one of them supposed dead. During the engagement Fort Macon fired seventy shots at the engaging forces.--New York Herald. This day a party of Union soldiers sent from Kansas City in search of Quantrel's band of outlaws, came upon them near the Little Blue River, in Jackson County, Mo., and after a hard fight, succeeded in killing five, and capturing seventeen of them. Quantrel had his horse shot from under him, and made his escape by swimming the Missouri River.-
April 25. The bombardment of Fort Macon, N. C., by the combined forces of Gen. Burnside and Com. Goldsborough, terminated in the reduction and capture of the garrison.--(Doc. 135.) The Forts on Lake Ponchartrain, La., were this day evacuated by the rebel forces, and all their gunboats on the lake were burnt or otherwise destroyed.--Richmond Dispatch, April 29. New-Orleans, La., surrendered to the naval forces of the United States, under the command of Flag-Officer D. G. Farragut.--(Doc. 149.) Major-Gen. C. F. Smith died at Savannah, Tenn., at four o'clock this afternoon, of dysentery. He was taken sick shortly after the occupation of Savannah by the forces under him. Major Von Steinhaus, Capt. Botticher, and Capt. Camp, of the Sixty-eighth regiment of New York volunteers; Lieut. Lombard, Battalion Adjutant Eighth Illinois cavalry, and Assist. Surg. Williams, First New York artillery, were, by the order of President Lincoln, struck from the roll of the arm
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