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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 34 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 26 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 6 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 6 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
iii.20.17ff.; Juvenal vi.526ff.; Statius, Sylv. iii.2.101ff.; Hyginus, Fab. 145. Reigning over the Egyptians Epaphus married Memphis, daughter of Nile, founded and named the city of Memphis after her, and begat a daughter Libya, after whom the region of Libya was called.Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 894. Libya had by Poseidon twin sons, Agenor and Belus.Compare Tzetzes, Chiliades vii.349ff. Agenor departed to Phoenicia and reigned there, and there he became the ancestor of the great stock; hence we shall defer our account of him.See below, Apollod. 3.1. But Belus remained in Egypt, reigned over the country, and married Anchinoe, daughter of Nile, by whom he had twin sons, Egyptus and Danaus,The following account of Egyptus and Danaus, including the settlement of Danaus and his daughters at Argos, is quoted verbally, with a few omissions and changes, by the Scholiast
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
, Belus and Agenor. Now Belus reigned over the Egyptians and begat the aforesaid sons; but Agenor went to Phoenicia, married Telephassa, and begat a daughter Europa and three sons, Cadmus, Phoenix, and Cilix.The ancients were nographer 148; Second Vatican Mythographer 76). The connexion which the myth of Zeus and Europa indicates between Phoenicia and Crete receives a certain confirmation from the worship at Gaza of a god called Marnas, who was popularly idEuropa, they gave up the thought of returning home, and took up their abode in divers places; Phoenix settled in Phoenicia; Cilix settled near Phoenicia, and all the country subject to himself near the river Pyramus he called Cilicia; and CadPhoenicia, and all the country subject to himself near the river Pyramus he called Cilicia; and Cadmus and Telephassa took up their abode in Thrace and in like manner Thasus founded a city Thasus in an island off Thrace and dwelt there.Apollodorus probably meant to say that Thasus colonized the island of Thasos. The text may be cor
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
Paris in Sparta, the departure of Menelaus for Crete, and the flight of the guilty pair, compare Proclus, Chrestom. i., in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 17; Tzetzes, Antehomerica 96-134. As to the death of Catreus, the maternal grandfather of Menelaus, see above, Apollod. 3.2.1ff. But Hera sent them a heavy storm which forced them to put in at Sidon. And fearing lest he should be pursued, Alexander spent much time in Phoenicia and Cyprus.The voyage of Paris and Helen to Sidon was known to Hom. Il. 6.289ff., with the Scholiast on Hom. Il. 6.291. It was also recorded in the epic Cypria, according to Proclus, who says that Paris captured the city (Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 18). Yet according to Hdt. 2.117, the author of the Cypria described how Paris and Helen sailed in three days from Sparta to Ilium with a fair w
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
n compliance with an oracle, which assured the Spartans of victory over their stubborn foes the Tegeans, if only they could get possession of these valuable relics. See Hdt. 1.67ff.; Paus. 3.3.5ff.; Paus. 3.11.10; Paus. 8.54.3. Menelaus, with five ships in all under his command, put in at Sunium, a headland of Attica; and being again driven thence by winds to Crete he drifted far away, and wandering up and down Libya, and Phoenicia, and Cyprus, and Egypt, he collected much treasure.For the wanderings of Menelaus on the voyage from Troy, see Hom. Od. 3.276-302; compare Paus. 10.25.2. And according to some, he discovered Helen at the court of Proteus, king of Egypt; for till then Menelaus had only a phantom of her made of clouds.As to the real and the phantom Helen, see above, Apollod. E.3.5, with the note. And after wandering for eight years he came to port at Mycenae, and t
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 498 (search)
Pisthetaerus Formerly also the kite was ruler and king over the Greeks. Leader of the Chorus The Greeks? Pisthetaerus And when he was king, he was the one who first taught them to fall on their knees before the kites. Euelpides By Zeus! that's what I did myself one day on seeing a kite; but at the moment I was on my knees, and leaning backwards with mouth agape, I bolted an obolus and was forced to carry my meal-sack home empty. Pisthetaerus The cuckoo was king of Egypt and of the whole of Phoenicia. When he called out “cuckoo,” all the Phoenicians hurried to the fields to reap their wheat and their barley. Euelpides Hence no doubt the proverb, “Cuckoo! cuckoo! go to the fields, ye circumcised.” Pisthetaerus So powerful were the birds that the kings of Grecian cities, Agamemnon, Menelaus, for instance, carried a bird on the tip of their scepters, who had his share of all presents. Euelpides That I didn't know and was much astonished when I saw Priam come upon the stage in the tragedi
Demosthenes, Philip, section 6 (search)
Not content with this, you have shown your contempt for right and your hostility to me by actually sending an embassy to urge the king of Persia to declare war on me. This is the most amazing exploit of all; for, before the king reduced Egypt and Phoenicia,These two provinces, together with Cyprus, revolted in 346 and were recovered by Artaxerxes Ochus. Greek mercenaries formed the backbone of the armies on both sides. See Grote, chap. 90. Nothing is known of any such Athenian decree. you passed a decree calling on me to make common cause with the rest of the Greeks against him, in case he attempted to interfere with us;
Demosthenes, Against Callippus, section 20 (search)
Now, men of the jury, I shall show you that Lycon had no dealings with Callippus; for I think this will be something to confound the impudent assurance of this man, who asserts that this money was given to him by Lycon as a present. Lycon had lent to Megacleides of Eleusis and his brother Thrasyllus the sum of forty minae for a voyage to AcêAcê, a town on the coast of Phoenicia. but, when they changed their minds and decided not to risk the voyage to that point, Lycon, after making some complaints against Megacleides regarding the interest, and believing that he had been deceived, quarrelled with him and went to law for the purpose of recovering his loan
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 2 (search)
Xerxes, vying with the zeal displayed by the Carthaginians, surpassed them in all his preparations to the degree that he excelled the Carthaginians in the multitude of peoples at his command. And he began to have ships built throughout all the territory along the sea that was subject to him, both Egypt and Phoenicia and Cyprus, Cilicia and Pamphylia and Pisidia, and also Lycia, Caria, Mysia, the Troad, and the cities on the Hellespont, and Bithynia, and Pontus. Spending a period of three years, as did the Carthaginians, on his preparations, he made ready more than twelve hundred warships. He was aided in this by his father Darius, who before his death had made preparations of great armaments; for Darius, after Datis, his general, had been defeated by the Athenians at Marathon, had continued to be angry with the Athenians for having won that battle. But Darius, when already about to cross overi.e. from Asia into Europe via the
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 60 (search)
t mixed in race. and still had Persian garrisons, he had recourse to force and laid siege to them; then, after he had brought over to his side the cities of Caria, he likewise won over by persuasion those of Lycia. Also, by taking additional ships from the allies, who were continually being added, he still further increased the size of his fleet.Now the Persians had composed their land forces from their own peoples, but their navy they had gathered from both Phoenicia and Cyprus and Cilicia, and the commander of the Persian armaments was Tithraustes, who was an illegitimate son of Xerxes. And when Cimon learned that the Persian fleet was lying off Cyprus, sailing against the barbarians he engaged them in battle, pitting two hundred and fifty ships against three hundred and forty. A sharp struggle took place and both fleets fought brilliantly, but in the end the Athenians were victorious, having destroyed many of the enemy ships
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 75 (search)
461 B.C.When Euthippus was archon in Athens, the Romans chose as consuls Quintus Servilius and Spurius Postumius Albinus. During this year, in Asia Artabazus and Megabyzus, who had been dispatched to the war against the Egyptians, set out from Persia with more than three hundred thousand soldiers, counting both cavalry and infantry. When they arrived in Cilicia and Phoenicia, they rested their land forces after the journey and commanded the Cyprians and Phoenicians and Cilicians to supply ships. And when three hundred triremes had been made ready, they fitted them out with the ablest marines and arms and missiles and everything else that is useful in naval warfare. So these leaders were busy with their preparations and with giving their soldiers training and accustoming every man to the practice of warfare, and they spent almost this entire year in this way. Meanwhile the Athenians in Egypt were besieging the troops which had taken
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