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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 10 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 10 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Sidon (Lebanon) or search for Sidon (Lebanon) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 6, line 212 (search)
words. Would that the earth might open her jaws and swallow him, for Zeus bred him to be the bane of the Trojans, and of Priam and Priam's sons. Could I but see him go down into the house of Hades, my heart would forget its heaviness." His mother went into the house and called her waiting-women who gathered the matrons throughout the city. She then went down into her fragrant store-room, where her embroidered robes were kept, the work of Sidonian women, whom Alexander had brought over from Sidon when he sailed the seas [pontos] upon that voyage during which he carried off Helen. Hecuba took out the largest robe, and the one that was most beautifully enriched with embroidery, as an offering to Athena: it glittered like a star, and lay at the very bottom of the chest. With this she went on her way and many matrons with her. When they reached the temple of Athena, lovely Theano, daughter of Kisseus and wife of Antenor, opened the doors, for the Trojans had made her priestess of Athen
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 23, line 703 (search)
ch cruel suffering; the victory is with both alike, take each of you an equal prize, and let the other Achaeans now compete." Thus did he speak and they did even as he had said, and put on their shirts again after wiping the dust from off their bodies. The son of Peleus then offered prizes for speed in running - a mixing-bowl beautifully wrought, of pure silver. It would hold six measures, and far exceeded all others in the whole world for beauty; it was the work of cunning artificers in Sidon, and had been brought into port by Phoenicians from beyond the sea [pontos], who had made a present of it to Thoas. Eueneus son of Jason had given it to Patroklos in ransom of Priam's son Lykaon, and Achilles now offered it as a prize [athlon] in honor of his comrade to him who should be the swiftest runner. For the second prize he offered a large ox, well fattened, while for the last there was to be half a talent of gold. He then rose and said among the Argives, "Stand forward, you who will